Sir Robert Pigot, 2nd Baronet

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Portrait by Francis Cotes, c. 1765 RobertPigotByFrancisCotes.jpg
Portrait by Francis Cotes, c. 1765

Sir Robert Pigot, 2nd Baronet (20 September 1720 – 1 August 1796) was a British Army officer during the American Revolutionary War.

Great Britain island in the North Atlantic off the north-west coast of continental Europe

Great Britain is an island in the North Atlantic Ocean off the northwest coast of continental Europe. With an area of 209,331 km2 (80,823 sq mi), it is the largest of the British Isles, the largest European island, and the ninth-largest island in the world. In 2011, Great Britain had a population of about 61 million people, making it the world's third-most populous island after Java in Indonesia and Honshu in Japan. The island of Ireland is situated to the west of Great Britain, and together these islands, along with over 1,000 smaller surrounding islands, form the British Isles archipelago.

American Revolutionary War 1775–1783 war between Great Britain and the Thirteen Colonies, which won independence as the United States of America

The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was an 18th-century war between Great Britain and its Thirteen Colonies which declared independence as the United States of America.

Life

Robert Pigot was born in London, England in 1720. His two brothers were George Pigot, 1st Baron Pigot, Governor of Madras, India and Admiral Hugh Pigot, Commander-in-Chief of the West Indies fleet. He and his brothers shared Huguenot ancestry through their grandfather Peter Godde, who had come to England in the late seventeenth century. [1]

London Capital of the United Kingdom

London is the capital and largest city of both England and the United Kingdom. Standing on the River Thames in the south-east of England, at the head of its 50-mile (80 km) estuary leading to the North Sea, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. Londinium was founded by the Romans. The City of London, London's ancient core − an area of just 1.12 square miles (2.9 km2) and colloquially known as the Square Mile − retains boundaries that follow closely its medieval limits. The City of Westminster is also an Inner London borough holding city status. Greater London is governed by the Mayor of London and the London Assembly.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

George Pigot, 1st Baron Pigot British governor of Madras

George Pigot, 1st Baron Pigot was twice the British President of the British East India Company (India).

In 1758 Pigot was major in the 10th Regiment of Foot. In 1764 he was lieutenant colonel. From 1769 to 1775 he was the commander of the 38th Regiment of Foot.

Major is a military rank of commissioned officer status, with corresponding ranks existing in many military forces throughout the world.

Lieutenant colonel (pronounced Lef-ten-ent Kernel or Loo-ten-ent Kernel ) is a rank of commissioned officer in the armies, most marine forces and some air forces of the world, above a major and below a colonel. The rank of lieutenant colonel is often shortened to simply "colonel" in conversation and in unofficial correspondence. Sometimes, the term, 'half-colonel' is used in casual conversation in the British Army. A lieutenant colonel is typically in charge of a battalion in the army.

He also served as a Member of Parliament for Wallingford from 1768 to 1772. He was appointed Warden of the Mint from August, 1771 until his death. [2]

Wallingford was a constituency in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

Warden of the Mint

Warden of the Mint was a high-ranking position at the Royal Mint in England from 1216–1829. The warden was responsible for a variety of minting procedures and acted as the immediate representative of the current monarch inside the mint. The role of warden changed greatly through history with the original task being the receiving, assay and payment for bullion, while later evolving into more of an administerial role.

On 17 June 1775 he commanded the left flank of the British assault in the Battle of Bunker Hill. On 9 July he was colonel in the 55th Regiment of Foot. He was promoted to the permanent grade of colonel for his bravery in the battle of Bunker Hill. He was made a major general in 1777. Pigot was placed in command in Rhode Island and made a lieutenant general in 1782. In the Battle of Rhode Island he fought with 3,000 men against 5,000 men under General John Sullivan. He inherited the baronetcy of his older brother Lord George Pigot (it had been created with special remainder) and the Patshull Hall estate in 1777. He also inherited a one-third share of the Pigot Diamond, which remained in the family until sold in a lottery in 1801. On 8 February he resigned and died 1 August 1796 in Stafford, England.

Battle of Bunker Hill Early battle of the American Revoluntionary War

The Battle of Bunker Hill was fought on June 17, 1775, during the Siege of Boston in the early stages of the American Revolutionary War. The battle is named after Bunker Hill in Charlestown, Massachusetts, which was peripherally involved in the battle. It was the original objective of both the colonial and British troops, though the majority of combat took place on the adjacent hill which later became known as Breed's Hill.

Colonel is a senior military officer rank below the brigadier and general officer ranks. However, in some small military forces, such as those of Monaco or the Vatican, colonel is the highest rank. It is also used in some police forces and paramilitary organizations.

Major general is a military rank used in many countries. It is derived from the older rank of sergeant major general. The disappearance of the "sergeant" in the title explains the apparently confusing phenomenon whereby a lieutenant general outranks a major general while a major outranks a lieutenant.

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The Pigot Baronetcy, of Patshull Hall in the County of Stafford, is a title in the Baronetage of Great Britain. It was created on 5 December 1764 for the politician and colonial administrator George Pigot, with remainder to his brothers General Robert Pigot and Admiral Hugh Pigot, and remains extant. On 19 January 1766 Pigot was further honoured when he was raised to the Peerage of Ireland as Baron Pigot, with normal remainder to the heirs male of his body. Lord Pigot was unmarried and on his death in 1777 the barony became extinct. He was succeeded in the baronetcy according to the special remainder by his brother, Robert, the second Baronet. He was a distinguished soldier.

Admiral Hugh Pigot, of Wychwood Forest in Oxfordshire, was a Royal Navy officer. He commanded York at the reduction of Louisbourg in June 1758 and commanded Royal William at the capture of Quebec in September 1759 during the Seven Years' War. He went on to serve as Commander-in-Chief of the Leeward Islands Station during the American Revolutionary War and then became First Naval Lord. He also served as a Member of Parliament.

General Ralph Gore, 1st Earl of Ross, known as Sir Ralph Gore, 6th Baronet from 1746 until 1764, subsequently as The Lord Gore until 1768 and then as The Viscount Belleisle until 1772, was an Irish soldier, politician and peer.

Lt.-Gen. Forbes Champagné was a British Army officer who fought in the American Revolutionary War and served as Commander-in-Chief of the British Indian Army, 1807–11.

Major general Welbore Ellis Doyle (1758–1797) was the third Military Governor of British Ceylon. He was appointed on 1 January 1797 and was Governor until 2 July 1797. He was succeeded by Peter Bonnevaux.

Josiah Champagné

Gen. Sir Josiah Champagné was a British military commander who was the fifth General Officer Commanding, Ceylon. He was appointed in February 1799 until 1799. He was succeeded by Hay MacDowall.

References

  1. Marshall, P. J. (2004). "Pigot, George, Baron Pigot (1719–1777)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 30 December 2013.
  2. Sainty, J.C. "Wardens of the Mint". Institute for Historical research. Retrieved 14 January 2010.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Sir John Gibbons
George Pigot
Member of Parliament for Wallingford
17681772
With: John Aubrey
Succeeded by
John Aubrey
John Cator
Military offices
Preceded by
The Earl of Cavan
Colonel of the 55th Regiment of Foot
1775
Succeeded by
James Grant
Political offices
Preceded by
William Whitmore
Warden of the Mint
1771–1796
Succeeded by
Sir Walter James
Baronetage of Great Britain
Preceded by
George Pigot
Baronet
(of Patshull)
17771796
Succeeded by
George Pigot