Sir Thomas Cotton, 2nd Baronet, of Connington

Last updated

A painting of Thomas Cotton by Cornelis Janssens van Ceulen Thomas Cotton.jpg
A painting of Thomas Cotton by Cornelis Janssens van Ceulen

Sir Thomas Cotton, 2nd Baronet, of Connington (1594 – 16 May 1662) was an English politician and heir to the Cottonian Library.

Contents

Life

He was the only surviving child of Sir Robert Cotton, 1st Baronet, of Connington and Elizabeth Brocas. He graduated B.A. at Broadgates Hall, Oxford in 1616. In 1624 he became Member of Parliament for Great Marlow. [1]

Sir Robert Cotton, 1st Baronet, of Connington English antiquarian

Sir Robert Bruce Cotton, 1st Baronet of Conington Hall in the parish of Conington in Huntingdonshire, England, was a Member of Parliament and an antiquarian who founded the Cotton library.

Great Marlow, sometimes simply called Marlow, was a parliamentary borough in Buckinghamshire. It elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons between 1301 and 1307, and again from 1624 until 1868, and then one member from 1868 until 1885, when the borough was abolished.

Sir Thomas was the intimate friend and correspondent of Sir John Eliot, and was entrusted by his influence with the representation of St Germans (Eliot's native place) in the third of Charles I's parliaments. He was M.P. for Huntingdonshire in the Short Parliament of 1640, but took no active part in politics or the civil wars. His house at Westminster was left at the disposal of the parliament, and Charles I slept there during his trial. Cotton died at Connington on 13 May 1662, and was buried with his father.

St Germans was a rotten borough in Cornwall which returned two Members of Parliament to the House of Commons in the English and later British Parliament from 1562 to 1832, when it was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

Huntingdonshire was a Parliamentary constituency covering the county of Huntingdonshire in England. It was represented in the House of Commons of England until 1707, then in the House of Commons of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800, and then in the House of Commons the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1885. It returned two Knights of the Shire ; when elections were contested, the bloc vote system was used.

Short Parliament Parliament of England that was summoned by King Charles I of England

The Short Parliament was a Parliament of England that was summoned by King Charles I of England on 20 February 1640 and sat from 13 April to 5 May 1640. It was so called because of its short life of only three weeks.

Cottonian Library

He made great efforts for the restitution of his father's library, which later became the nucleus of the British Library. On 23 July 1631, the council ordered the catalogue to be continued; but in September Sir Thomas announced that it had been again interrupted, and begged to be allowed to retain possession of the books. This request was ultimately granted, although the date is uncertain.

British Library national library of the United Kingdom

The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom and the largest national library in the world by number of items catalogued. It is estimated to contain 150–200 million+ items from many countries. As a legal deposit library, the British Library receives copies of all books produced in the United Kingdom and Ireland, including a significant proportion of overseas titles distributed in the UK. The Library is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Like his father, Sir Thomas gave scholars free access to his library. William Dugdale from an early age was often there, and obtained there much of his material for his Monasticon. In 1640 Sir Thomas lent his father's collection of coins to Sir Symonds D'Ewes. He moved the greater part of the library in 1650 to a villa at Stratton, Bedfordshire, which belonged to his son's wife.

William Dugdale English officer of arms

Sir William Dugdale was an English antiquary and herald. As a scholar he was influential in the development of medieval history as an academic subject.

Family

He married, first, Margaret, daughter of Lord William Howard, of Naworth Castle, Cumberland, by whom he had one son, John; second, Alice, daughter and heiress of Sir John Constable of Dromanby, Yorkshire, widow of Edmund Anderson of Stratton and Eyworth, Bedfordshire, by whom he had four sons. The second son, Robert, was Member of Parliament for Cambridgeshire, was knighted, was commissioner of the post office, and was friendly with John Evelyn.

Lord William Howard was an English nobleman and antiquary, sometimes known as "Belted or Bauld (bold) Will".

Naworth Castle Grade I listed castle in the United Kingdom

Naworth Castle, also known as, or recorded in historical documents as "Naward", is a castle in Cumbria, England, near the town of Brampton. It is adjacent to the A69 about 2 miles (3.2 km) east of Brampton. It is on the opposite side of the River Irthing to, and just within sight of, Lanercost Priory. It was the seat of the Barons Dacre and is now that of their cognatic descendants, the Earls of Carlisle. It is a grade I listed building.

Cumberland historic county of England

Cumberland is a historic county of North West England that had an administrative function from the 12th century until 1974. It was bordered by Northumberland to the east, County Durham to the southeast, Westmorland and Lancashire to the south, and the Scottish counties of Dumfriesshire and Roxburghshire to the north. It formed an administrative county from 1889 to 1974 and now forms part of Cumbria.

Related Research Articles

Miles Corbet English politician and regicide

Miles Corbet (1595–1662) was an English politician, recorder of Yarmouth and Regicide.

Robert Bruce, 1st Earl of Ailesbury British politician

Robert Bruce, 1st Earl of Ailesburyand 2nd Earl of Elgin, PC, FRS, was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1660 to 1663, when he inherited his father's title as Earl of Elgin.

Thomas Chicheley English politician 1614-1699

Sir Thomas Chicheley was a politician in England in the seventeenth century who fell from favour in the reign of James II. His name is sometimes spelt as Chichele.

There have been four Abdy baronetcies:

Sir Norton Knatchbull, 1st Baronet English politician

Sir Norton Knatchbull, 1st Baronet was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1640 and 1679.

Richard James was an English scholar, poet, and the first librarian of the Cotton library.

Sir John Pakington, 1st Baronet (1600–1624) was an English baronet and M.P. for Aylesbury in 1623–16234.

Fleetwood is an Anglo-Swedish Baronial family, number 49 on the Swedish Riddarhuset. The family is descended from Lancashire in England. The oldest member known by name is William Fleetwood, mentioned 1320, however, documented information about the family starts in the 16th century.

Sir Job Charlton, 1st Baronet KS was an English judge and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1659 and 1679. He was Speaker of the House of Commons of England briefly in 1673.

Thomas Cartwright (bishop) Bishop of Chester

Thomas Cartwright (1634–1689) was an English bishop and diarist, known as a supporter of James II.

Sir Richard Carew, 1st Baronet English politician

Sir Richard Carew, 1st Baronet, of Antony in Cornwall, was a British writer and Member of Parliament.

Sir Alexander Carew, 2nd Baronet English politician

Sir Alexander Carew, 2nd Baronet, of Antony in Cornwall, was an English Member of Parliament executed for attempting to betray the Parliamentary cause during the English Civil War.

Sir Miles Fleetwood of Aldwinkle, Northamptonshire was an English office-holder and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1614 and 1641.

Sir Thomas Hele, 1st Baronet English politician

Sir Thomas Hele, 1st Baronet of Flete in the parish of Holbeton in Devon, was three times elected a Member of Parliament for Plympton Erle, in 1626, 1628–29 and 1640 and once for Okehampton, in 1661–1670. He was a Royalist commander during the Civil War. He was created a baronet in 1627.

Sir Anthony Cope, 1st Baronet English Puritan Member of Parliament

Sir Anthony Cope, 1st Baronet of Hanwell in Oxfordshire, was an English Puritan Member of Parliament.

Sir Thomas Proby, 1st Baronet was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1660 and 1685.

Sir John Cotton, 3rd Baronet was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1661 and 1687.

Lieutenant-General Sir John Bruce Hope, 7th Baronet Hope of Craighall was a Scottish soldier and politician.

Sir John Cotton, 4th Baronet was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons of England and the House of Commons of Great Britain at various times between 1705 and 1713.

References

Notes

  1. "Sir Thomas Cotton, 2nd Bt". The Peerage. 5 December 2013.
Attribution

Wikisource-logo.svg  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain :  Stephen, Leslie, ed. (1887). "Cotton, Robert Bruce"  . Dictionary of National Biography . 12. London: Smith, Elder & Co.


Parliament of England
Preceded by
Constituency re-enfranchised
Member of Parliament for Great Marlow
1624–1625
With: Henry Borlase 1624
John Backhouse 1625
Succeeded by
John Backhouse
Sir William Hicks, Bt
Preceded by
Sir John Eliot
Sir Henry Marten
Member of Parliament for St Germans
1628–1629
With: Benjamin Valentine
Succeeded by
Parliament suspended until 1640
Preceded by
Parliament suspended since 1629
Member of Parliament for Huntingdonshire
1640
With: Sir Capell Bedell
Succeeded by
Sir Sidney Montagu
Valentine Walton
Baronetage of England
Preceded by
Robert Cotton
Baronet
(of Connington)
1631–1662
Succeeded by
John Cotton