Skalisko

Last updated
Skalisko
Settlement
Country Flag of Poland.svg Poland
Voivodeship Warmian-Masurian
County Węgorzewo
Gmina Budry
Time zone UTC+01:00 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+02:00 (CEST)

Skalisko [skaˈliskɔ] (German : Skallischen) [1] is a settlement in the administrative district of Gmina Budry, within Węgorzewo County, Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship, in northern Poland, close to the border with the Kaliningrad Oblast of Russia. [2]

Before 1945, the area was part of Germany (East Prussia). After the war it became part of Poland.

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References

  1. "Former Territory of Germany" (in German). 2017-11-13.
  2. "Central Statistical Office (GUS) - TERYT (National Register of Territorial Land Apportionment Journal)" (in Polish). 2008-06-01.