Slim Pickens

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Slim Pickens
Slim Pickens 1972.jpg
Slim Pickens in 1972
Born
Louis Burton Lindley Jr.

(1919-06-29)June 29, 1919
Kingsburg, California, U.S.
DiedDecember 8, 1983(1983-12-08) (aged 64)
Modesto, California, U.S.
Years active1946–1983
Spouse(s)Margaret (née Harmon) Lindley
Children3

Louis Burton Lindley Jr. (June 29, 1919 December 8, 1983), better known by his stage name Slim Pickens, was an American rodeo performer and film and television actor. [1] During much of his career, Pickens played mainly cowboy roles, [1] and is perhaps best remembered today for his comic roles in Dr. Strangelove and Blazing Saddles .

Stage name pseudonym used by performing artist

A stage name is a pseudonym used by performers and entertainers, such as actors, comedians, singers and musicians. Such titles are adopted for a wide variety of reasons and may be similar or nearly identical to an individual's birth name. In some situations, a performer will eventually adopt his or her title as a legal name, although this is often not the case. It should be noted that Personal names or Nicknames that make up the professional name should not necessarily be considered as a "fake name" like Lady Gaga : for example: Miley Cyrus: born Destiny Hope Cyrus, uses her personal nickname "Miley" and her maiden name "Cyrus" as her professional name, in 2018 she legally changed to Miley Ray Hemsworth.

Rodeo competitive sport

Rodeo is a competitive sport that arose out of the working practices of cattle herding in Spain, Mexico, and later Central America, South America, the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. It was based on the skills required of the working vaqueros and later, cowboys, in what today is the western United States, western Canada, and northern Mexico. Today, it is a sporting event that involves horses and other livestock, designed to test the skill and speed of the cowboys and cowgirls. American style professional rodeos generally comprise the following events: tie-down roping, team roping, steer wrestling, saddle bronc riding, bareback bronc riding, bull riding and barrel racing. The events are divided into two basic categories: the rough stock events and the timed events. Depending on sanctioning organization and region, other events such as breakaway roping, goat tying, and/or pole bending may also be a part of some rodeos.

<i>Dr. Strangelove</i> 1964 British-American satire film directed by Stanley Kubrick

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, more commonly known simply as Dr. Strangelove, is a 1964 political satire black comedy film that satirizes the Cold War fears of a nuclear conflict between the Soviet Union and the United States. The film was directed, produced, and co-written by Stanley Kubrick, stars Peter Sellers, George C. Scott and Slim Pickens. Production took place in the United Kingdom. The film is loosely based on Peter George's thriller novel Red Alert (1958).

Contents

Early life

Louis Burton Lindley Jr. was born in Kingsburg, California, the son of Sally Mosher (née Turk) and Louis Bert Lindley Sr., a Texas-born dairy farmer. Young Lindley was an excellent horse rider from an early age. Known as "Bert" to his family and friends, he grew bored with dairy farming and began to make a few dollars by riding broncos and roping steers in his early teens. His father found out and forbade this activity but he took no notice, went to compete in a rodeo, and was told by the doubtful rodeo manager that there would be "slim pickin's" for him.

Kingsburg, California City in California, United States

Kingsburg is a city in Fresno County, California. Kingsburg is located 5 miles (8 km) southeast of Selma at an elevation of 302 feet, on the banks of the Kings River. The city is half an hour away from Fresno, and two hours away from the California Central Coast and Sierra Nevada Mountain Range. The population was 11,382 at the 2010 census.

To prevent his father from discovering that he had competed, he entered his name as Slim Pickens and won $400 that afternoon. Lindley graduated from Hanford High School, Hanford, California, and was a member of the Future Farmers of America. He joined the rodeo, billed as Slim Pickens, and eventually became a well-known rodeo clown.

The Hanford Joint Union High School District in Hanford consists of a total of 3,522 students from three comprehensive high schools - Hanford High School and Hanford West High School along with Earl F. Johnson Continuation School, and Hanford Adult School. A third comprehensive state of art high school - Sierra Pacific High School opened on August 13, 2009 with 217 freshman.

Hanford, California City in California

Hanford is an important commercial and cultural center in the south central San Joaquin Valley and is the county seat of Kings County, California. It is the principal city of the Hanford-Corcoran metropolitan area, which encompasses all of Kings County, including the cities of Hanford and Corcoran. The ZIP Code is 93230. The city of Hanford is surrounded by communities that do not fall within the city limits but use the same zip code. These communities include Grangeville, Hardwick and Home Garden.

Rodeo clown

A rodeo clown, bullfighter (US/Canada) or rodeo protection athlete, is a rodeo performer who works in bull riding competitions. Originally, the rodeo clown was a single job combining "bullfighting"—the protection of riders thrown from the bull, as well as being an individual who provided comic relief. Today in the USA, the job is split into two separate ones, hiring bullfighters who protect the riders from the bull, and entertainers, a barrelman and a clown, who provides comic humor. However, in other parts of the world and at some small rodeos, the jobs of rodeo rider protection and comic remain combined.

During World War II, he enlisted in the United States Army. Reportedly when the recruiter asked him his profession, he responded "Rodeo". This was misread as radio and he spent his entire enlistment at a radio station in the American Midwest. [2]

World War II 1939–1945 global war

World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. A state of total war emerged, directly involving more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. The major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease, and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.

United States Army Land warfare branch of the United States Armed Forces

The United States Army (USA) is the land warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces. It is one of the seven uniformed services of the United States, and is designated as the Army of the United States in the United States Constitution. As the oldest and most senior branch of the U.S. military in order of precedence, the modern U.S. Army has its roots in the Continental Army, which was formed to fight the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783)—before the United States of America was established as a country. After the Revolutionary War, the Congress of the Confederation created the United States Army on 3 June 1784 to replace the disbanded Continental Army. The United States Army considers itself descended from the Continental Army, and dates its institutional inception from the origin of that armed force in 1775.

Film career

After nearly 20 years of rodeo work, his distinctive country drawl (not to be mistaken for someone from Oklahoma or Texas, he was a lifelong Californian), his wide eyes, moon face, and strong physical presence gained him a role in the Western film, Rocky Mountain (1950) starring Errol Flynn. He appeared in many more Westerns, playing both villains and comic sidekicks to the likes of Rex Allen.

Oklahoma State of the United States of America

Oklahoma is a state in the South Central region of the United States, bordered by Kansas on the north, Missouri on the northeast, Arkansas on the east, Texas on the south, New Mexico on the west, and Colorado on the northwest. It is the 20th-most extensive and the 28th-most populous of the fifty United States. The state's name is derived from the Choctaw words okla and humma, meaning "red people". It is also known informally by its nickname, "The Sooner State", in reference to the non-Native settlers who staked their claims on land before the official opening date of lands in the western Oklahoma Territory or before the Indian Appropriations Act of 1889, which dramatically increased European-American settlement in the eastern Indian Territory. Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory were merged into the State of Oklahoma when it became the 46th state to enter the union on November 16, 1907. Its residents are known as Oklahomans, and its capital and largest city is Oklahoma City.

Texas State of the United States of America

Texas is the second largest state in the United States by both area and population. Geographically located in the South Central region of the country, Texas shares borders with the U.S. states of Louisiana to the east, Arkansas to the northeast, Oklahoma to the north, New Mexico to the west, and the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León, and Tamaulipas to the southwest, while the Gulf of Mexico is to the southeast.

<i>Rocky Mountain</i> (film) 1950 film by William Keighley

Rocky Mountain is a 1950 western film directed by William Keighley and starring Errol Flynn. It also stars Patrice Wymore, who married Flynn in 1950. The film is set near the end of the American Civil War.

Hollywood made good use of Pickens' rodeo background. He did not need a stand-in for horseback scenes, and he was able to gallop his own Appaloosa horses across the desert, or drive a stagecoach pulled by a six-horse team. In a large number of films and TV shows, he wore his own hats and boots, and rode his own horses and mules.[ citation needed ]

A stand-in for film and television is a person who substitutes for the actor before filming, for technical purposes such as lighting and camera setup. Stand-ins are helpful in the initial processes of film and television production.

Pickens appeared in dozens of films, including Rocky Mountain (1950), Old Oklahoma Plains (1952), Down Laredo Way (1953), Tonka (1959), One-Eyed Jacks (1961) with Marlon Brando, Dr. Strangelove (1964), Major Dundee (1965) with Charlton Heston, the remake of Stagecoach (1966; Pickens played the driver, portrayed in the 1939 film by Andy Devine), Never a Dull Moment (1968), The Cowboys (1972) with John Wayne, The Getaway (1972) with Steve McQueen, Ginger in the Morning (1974) with Fred Ward, Blazing Saddles (1974), Poor Pretty Eddie (1975), Rancho Deluxe (1975), Tom Horn (1980), also with McQueen, Beyond the Poseidon Adventure (1979) with Michael Caine and Karl Malden, An Eye for an Eye (1966) and Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973). He had a small but memorable role in Steven Spielberg's 1941 (1979) in scenes with Toshiro Mifune and Christopher Lee; during one scene, he enumerates the objects on his person, similar to the way he does in the "Survival Kit Contents Check" scene in Dr. Strangelove. In 1978, Pickens lent his voice to theme park Silver Dollar City as a character named Rube Dugan, for a ride called "Rube Dugan's Diving Bell". The diving bell was a simulation ride that took passengers on a journey to the bottom of Lake Silver and back. The ride was in operation from 1978 to 1984. He also played werewolf sheriff Sam Newfield in The Howling (1981).

In 1960, he appeared in the NBC Western series, Overland Trail in the episode "Sour Annie" with fellow guest stars Mercedes McCambridge and Andrew Prine. Pickens appeared five times on NBC's Outlaws (1960–62) Western series as the character "Slim". The program, starring Barton MacLane, was the story of a U.S. marshal in Oklahoma Territory — deputies played by Don Collier, Jock Gaynor, and Bruce Yarnell — and the outlaws that they pursued. In 1967, Pickens had a recurring role as the scout California Joe Milner on the ABC military Western Custer, starring Wayne Maunder in the title role.

In 1975, Pickens was in another Western, playing the evil, limping bank robber in Walt Disney's The Apple Dumpling Gang ; that same year, the exploitation classic Poor Pretty Eddie was released, with Pickens portraying twisted Sheriff Orville. He provided the voice of B.O.B. in the 1979 Disney science-fiction thriller The Black Hole . His last film was his least notable, Pink Motel (1982) with Phyllis Diller.

Dr. Strangelove

Pickens played B-52 pilot Major T. J. "King" Kong. [3] in Dr. Strangelove. Stanley Kubrick cast Pickens after Peter Sellers, who played three other roles in the film, sprained his ankle and was unable to perform in the role due to having to work in the cramped cockpit set. Pickens was chosen because his accent and comic sense were perfect for the role of Kong, a cartoonishly patriotic and gung-ho B-52 commander. He was not given the script for the entire film, but only those portions in which he played a part. Three memorable scenes featuring Pickens were:

Slim Pickens as Major "King" Kong riding a nuclear bomb to oblivion in Dr. Strangelove Slim-pickens riding-the-bomb enh-lores.jpg
Slim Pickens as Major "King" Kong riding a nuclear bomb to oblivion in Dr. Strangelove
  1. A monologue meant to steel the crew for their duty after he receives the definitive inflight order to bomb a strategic target in the USSR
  2. Reading aloud to his crew the contents of their survival kits (possibly the first mention of condoms in a Hollywood film): After listing the contents usable for barter with Russian women (prophylactics, nylons, lipstick, etc.), as well as a .45 automatic pistol, Major Kong said, "Shoot, a fella could have a pretty good time in Big D [Dallas] with all this stuff." This line had to be looped (the reference to Dallas changed to "weekend in Vegas") after the November 22, 1963, screening for critics was cancelled due to President John F. Kennedy's assassination. [3]
  3. Best known of all, Pickens riding a dropped H-bomb to a certain death, whooping and waving his cowboy hat (in the manner of a rodeo performer bronc riding or bull riding), not knowing its detonation will trigger a Russian doomsday device

Pickens credited Dr. Strangelove as a turning point in his career. Previously, he was "Hey you" on sets and afterward he was addressed as "Mr. Pickens". He once said, "After Dr. Strangelove, the roles, the dressing rooms, and the checks all started gettin' bigger." Pickens said he was amazed at the difference a single movie could make. [4] However, Pickens also said that working with Stanley Kubrick proved too difficult due to Kubrick's perfectionist style of directing with multiple takes for nearly every shot, especially with the climactic H-bomb riding scene, which was done in just over 100 takes. In the late 1970s, Pickens was offered the part of Dick Hallorann in Kubrick's adaptation of Stephen King's The Shining , but Pickens stipulated that he would appear in the film only if Kubrick was required to shoot Pickens' scenes in fewer than 100 takes. [5] Instead, Pickens' agent showed the script to Don Schwartz, the agent of Scatman Crothers, and Crothers accepted the role. [6]

Voice work

Pickens lent his voice to the 1975 studio recording of Bobby Bridger's collection of Western ballads A Ballad of the West , in which he narrated part 1, "Seekers of the Fleece", the story of Jim Bridger and the mountain man fur-trade era. Pickens also voiced B.O.B., one of the main robot characters in the 1979 science fiction film The Black Hole (uncredited). [3]

Television

Pickens appeared in numerous television guest shots, including a 1954 Stories of the Century episode in which he played the Sundance Kid to Joe Sawyer's Butch Cassidy, as well as four episodes of the syndicated Western series Annie Oakley (1956), with Gail Davis and Brad Johnson, and three episodes of NBC's The Wide Country (1962), a rodeo series starring Earl Holliman and Andrew Prine. In 1961, he had a recurring role as Johnson in the 17-episode NBC series The Americans , the story of how the American Civil War divided families. He was a credited semiregular in the role of "Slim" in the second season of the NBC Western series Outlaws . Thereafter, he was cast in a first-season episode of NBC's espionage series The Man from U.N.C.L.E. .

Pickens appeared in episodes of Cheyenne , Sugarfoot , Alfred Hitchcock Presents , The Lone Ranger , Frontier Doctor , Route 66 , The Tall Man , Maverick , Riverboat , The Fugitive , The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters , The Legend of Jesse James , Alias Smith and Jones , Daniel Boone , The Virginian , That Girl , [7] Baretta , Vega$ , How the West Was Won , and Kung Fu .

Pickens was cast in recurring roles in The Legend of Custer , Bonanza , Hee Haw (where he was a semiregular from 1981 to 1983), B. J. and the Bear with Greg Evigan, and Filthy Rich . He played Wild Jack Monroe, the owner of station WJM, on CBS's The Mary Tyler Moore Show , and also guest starred as Zeke in the 1963 episode "Higgins and the Hillbilly" on the ABC sitcom Our Man Higgins , starring Stanley Holloway as a British butler for a suburban American family. He portrayed Grandpa Shoenfield in a two-part 1980 episode of ABC's The Love Boat .

In an episode of CBS's Hawaii Five-O , he portrayed the patriarch of a family of serial killers.

Pickens emceed NBC's short-lived country music variety series The Nashville Palace in 1981.

Awards

In 1982, Pickens was inducted into the Western Performers Hall of Fame at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. [8]

In 1986, Pickens was honored by the Rodeo Historical Society during his posthumous induction into the Rodeo Hall of Fame at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. [9]

In 2006, Pickens was inducted into the Pendleton Round-Up and Happy Canyon Hall of Fame. [10]

In 2005, Pickens was posthumously inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in Colorado Springs for his work as a rodeo clown. [11]

Personal life

In his last years, Pickens lived with his wife in Columbia, California. He died on December 8, 1983, after surgery for a brain tumor. He was survived by his wife and children Thomas Michael Lindley and Margaret Louise Wittman (née Lindley), as well as his step-daughter, Daryle Ann Giardino née Wofford. His wife died in 2011 at the age of 89–90. [12]

His brother Samuel was also an actor, using the stage name Easy Pickens.

Filmography

Television

Death Valley Days (1958) - episode - The Telescope Eye - Season 6 Episode 26

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 Krebs, Albin (December 10, 1983). "SLIM PICKENS, KNOWN FOR COWBOY ROLES, DIES". The New York Times .
  2. Hayes, Richard (March 4, 2009). "Cowboys in Combat". True West Magazine.
  3. 1 2 3 4 Inside: 'Dr. Strangelove or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb' on IMDb
  4. Biography for Slim Pickens on IMDb
  5. Haskins, James; Crothers, Helen (1991). Scatman: An Authorized Biography of Scatman Crothers. W. Morrow. p. 178. ISBN   0688085210.
  6. Baxter, John (1997). Stanley Kubrick: A Biography. Basic Books. p. 315. ISBN   0786704853.
  7. TV.com
  8. "Great Western Performers - National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum". National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. Retrieved 2017-04-11.
  9. "Rodeo Hall of Fame Inductees - National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum". National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. Retrieved 2017-04-11.
  10. "Slim Pickens". Pendleton Round-Up and Happy Canyon Hall of Fame. pendletonhalloffame.com. Retrieved 2 January 2018.
  11. "Slim Pickens - Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame". Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2017-04-11.
  12. "Margaret Elizabeth Lindley". GENI. Retrieved June 20, 2015.