Snowflake, Arizona

Last updated
Snowflake, Arizona
SnowflakeTemple.jpg
The LDS Temple in Snowflake
Navajo County Arizona Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Snowflake Highlighted 0467800.svg
Location of Snowflake in Navajo County, Arizona.
Usa edcp location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Snowflake
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 34°31′20″N110°05′29″W / 34.52222°N 110.09139°W / 34.52222; -110.09139 Coordinates: 34°31′20″N110°05′29″W / 34.52222°N 110.09139°W / 34.52222; -110.09139
Country Flag of the United States.svg  United States
State Flag of Arizona.svg  Arizona
County Navajo
Founded1878
Founded by Erastus Snow and William Jordan Flake
Government
  Type Council-Manager
  BodySnowflake Town Council
  MayorLynn Johnson
Area
[1]
  Total33.58 sq mi (86.97 km2)
  Land33.52 sq mi (86.82 km2)
  Water0.06 sq mi (0.15 km2)
Elevation
[2]
5,682 ft (1,732 m)
Population
  Total5,590
  Estimate 
(2016) [4]
5,764
  Density171.95/sq mi (66.39/km2)
Time zone UTC-7 (Mountain)
  Summer (DST) UTC−7 (no DST/PDT)
ZIP codes
85937, 85942
Area code(s) 928
FIPS code 04-67800
GNIS ID(s) 34591, 2413301
Website Town of Snowflake
Historic Home, Snowflake, Arizona Historic Home, Snowflake, Arizona.jpg
Historic Home, Snowflake, Arizona

Snowflake is a town in Navajo County, Arizona, United States. It was founded in 1878 by Erastus Snow and William Jordan Flake, Mormon pioneers and colonizers. [5] It has frequently been noted on lists of unusual place names. [6] [7] According to 2012 Census Bureau estimates, the population of the town is 5,564. [8]

Navajo County, Arizona county in Arizona, United States

Navajo County is located in the northern part of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2010 census, its population was 107,449. The county seat is Holbrook.

United States federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

Erastus Snow American Mormon leader

Erastus Snow was a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1849 to until his death. Snow was also a leading figure in Mormon colonization of Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico.

Contents

Snowflake is 25 miles (40 km) south of Interstate 40 (formerly U.S. Route 66) via Highway 77. The Apache Railway provides freight service.

Interstate 40 Interstate across south-central US

Interstate 40 (I-40) is a major east-west Interstate Highway running through the south-central portion of the United States generally north of I-10 and I-20 but south of I-70. The western end is at I-15 in Barstow, California; its eastern end is at a concurrency of U.S. Route 117 (US 117) and North Carolina Highway 132 in Wilmington, North Carolina. It is the third-longest Interstate Highway in the United States, behind I-80 and I-90. Much of the western part of I-40, from Oklahoma City to Barstow parallels or overlays the historic US 66, east of Oklahoma City the route generally parallels US 64 and US 70. I-40 runs through many major cities including Albuquerque, New Mexico; Amarillo, Texas; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Little Rock, Arkansas; Memphis, Tennessee; Nashville, Tennessee; Knoxville, Tennessee; Winston-Salem, North Carolina; Greensboro, North Carolina; and Raleigh, North Carolina.

U.S. Route 66 former US highway between Chicago and Los Angeles

U.S. Route 66, also known as the Will Rogers Highway, the Main Street of America or the Mother Road, was one of the original highways in the U.S. Highway System. US 66 was established on November 11, 1926, with road signs erected the following year. The highway, which became one of the most famous roads in the United States, originally ran from Chicago, Illinois, through Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona before ending in Santa Monica in Los Angeles County, California, covering a total of 2,448 miles (3,940 km). It was recognized in popular culture by both the hit song "(Get Your Kicks on) Route 66" and the Route 66 television show in the 1960s. In John Steinbeck's classic-American novel, The Grapes of Wrath (1939), the road, "Highway 66", was turned into a powerful symbol of escape and loss.

Apache Railway transport company

The Apache Railway is an Arizona short-line railroad that operates from a connection with the BNSF Railway (BNSF) at Holbrook to the Snowflake Mill near Snowflake, Arizona, 38 miles (61 km). The APA was acquired by Catalyst Paper from Abitibi Consolidated in 2008. The Snowflake paper mill shut down permanently on September 30, 2012. In late 2015, the railway was purchased out of bankruptcy by a group including Aztec Land & Cattle Company and Midwest Poultry Producers, L.P., thereby avoiding a shutdown and scrappage of the line. The railway continues to operate, and its revenues are driven primarily by car repair and storage. The railway's freight revenues have not yet recovered from the shutdown of the Snowflake paper mill then owned by Catalyst, although efforts to enhance them continue.

Geography

Snowflake is located at 34°31′20″N110°05′29″W / 34.52222°N 110.09139°W / 34.52222; -110.09139 (34.5223005, -110.0913752). [2]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 30.9 square miles (80 km2), of which, 30.8 square miles (80 km2) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) of it (0.16%) is water.

United States Census Bureau bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1880 275
1910 494
1920 75853.4%
1930 1,25966.1%
1950 929
1960 9825.7%
1970 1,977101.3%
1980 3,51077.5%
1990 3,6794.8%
2000 4,46021.2%
2010 5,59025.3%
Est. 20165,764 [4] 3.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [9]

As of the census [10] of 2000, there were 4,460 people, 1,312 households, and 1,070 families residing in the town. The population density was 144.8 people per square mile (55.9/km²). There were 1,536 housing units at an average density of 49.9 per square mile (19.2/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 87.24% White, 0.27% Black or African American, 6.93% Native American, 0.49% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 3.00% from other races, and 2.00% from two or more races. 8.05% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Census Acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population

A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. The term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include agriculture, business, and traffic censuses. The United Nations defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every 10 years. United Nations recommendations also cover census topics to be collected, official definitions, classifications and other useful information to co-ordinate international practice.

Population density A measurement of population numbers per unit area or volume

Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and most of the time to humans. It is a key geographical term. In simple terms population density refers to the number of people living in an area per kilometer square.

There were 1,312 households out of which 46.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 69.5% were married couples living together, 9.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.4% were non-families. 15.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.37 and the average family size was 3.81.

Marriage social union or legal contract between people called spouses that creates kinship

Marriage, also called matrimony or wedlock, is a socially or ritually recognised union between spouses that establishes rights and obligations between those spouses, as well as between them and any resulting biological or adopted children and affinity. The definition of marriage varies around the world not only between cultures and between religions, but also throughout the history of any given culture and religion, evolving to both expand and constrict in who and what is encompassed, but typically it is principally an institution in which interpersonal relationships, usually sexual, are acknowledged or sanctioned. In some cultures, marriage is recommended or considered to be compulsory before pursuing any sexual activity. When defined broadly, marriage is considered a cultural universal. A marriage ceremony is known as a wedding.

In the town, the population was spread out with 37.9% under the age of 18, 9.8% from 18 to 24, 21.8% from 25 to 44, 19.8% from 45 to 64, and 10.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 28 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.3 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $37,439, and the median income for a family was $42,500. Males had a median income of $30,517 versus $21,164 for females. The per capita income for the town was $13,391. About 10.4% of families and 15.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.7% of those under age 18 and 14.1% of those age 65 or over.

Recently, the town and surrounding area have experienced steady growth, primarily to the east, west and south. An additional 9-holes were added to the 18-hole golf course where the Snowflake Arizona Temple was built by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 2002. The remoteness of Snowflake and the low level of pollution attracted many individuals suffering from multiple chemical sensitivity syndrome (MCS) to the town. [11] As of July 2016 there were approximately 20 households who reports to be suffering from MCS. [12]

Seasonal events

Education

Snowflake is a part of the Snowflake Unified School District, consisting of Highland Primary School, Snowflake Intermediate School, Snowflake Junior High and Snowflake High School. Taylor Elementary School in the neighboring town of Taylor, Arizona is also part of the Snowflake Unified school District.

Northland Pioneer College's Silver Creek campus extension is located in Snowflake.

Climate

Snowflake experiences a four-season climate with a warm (sometimes hot) summer, mild autumn, mild to cold winter and cool, windy spring. Typical high temperatures hover around 90 °F (32 °C) during July and August and 30 (-1 °C) to 55 °F (13 °C) in December/January.


Notable people

See also

Related Research Articles

Tonalea, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Tonalea is a census-designated place (CDP) in Coconino County, Arizona, United States. The population was 549 at the 2010 census.

Winslow West, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Winslow West is a census-designated place (CDP) in Coconino and Navajo counties in the U.S. state of Arizona. The population was 438 at the 2010 census. The entire community is off-reservation trust land belonging to the Hopi tribe. It lies just west of the city of Winslow, and more than 50 km (31 mi) south of the main Hopi reservation.

Hayden, Arizona Town in Arizona, United States

Hayden is a town in Gila County in the State of Arizona; Hayden's current mayor is Bob Smith. According to the 2010 census, the population of the town is 662.

Winkelman, Arizona Town in Arizona, United States

Winkelman is a town in Gila and Pinal counties in the U.S. state of Arizona. According to the 2010 census, the population of the town was 353, all of whom lived in Gila County.

Taylor, Arizona Town in Arizona, United States

Taylor is a town in Navajo County, Arizona, United States. It was founded by Mormon settlers in January 1878, several months before the neighboring community of Snowflake, Arizona. Taylor straddles Silver Creek, flowing from the nearby White Mountains to the Little Colorado River on Arizona's Colorado Plateau. According to the 2010 census, the population of the town is 4,112.

Dudleyville, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Dudleyville is a census-designated place (CDP) in Pinal County, Arizona, United States. The population was 959 at the 2010 census.

Kearny, Arizona Town in Arizona, United States

Kearny is a town in Pinal County, Arizona, United States. The town was named after General Stephen Watts Kearny, who passed through the area on November 7, 1846, while leading 100 dragoons to California. According to the 2010 census, the population of the town is 1,950. The economic base of Kearny and nearby towns is the Ray mine and Hayden Smelter, both owned and operated by ASARCO.

St. James City, Florida CDP in Florida, United States

St. James City is a census-designated place (CDP) on Pine Island in Lee County, Florida, United States. The population was 4,105 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Cape Coral-Fort Myers, Florida Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Kirkland, Illinois Village in Illinois, United States

Kirkland is a village in DeKalb County, Illinois, United States. The population was 1,744 at the 2010 census, up from 1,166 in 2000.

Hooppole, Illinois Village in Illinois, United States

Hooppole is a village in Henry County, Illinois, United States. The population was 204 at the 2010 census, up from 162 in 2000.

Indian Hills, Nevada Census-designated place in Nevada, United States

Indian Hills is a census-designated place (CDP) in Douglas County, Nevada, United States. It lies on the south side of the Carson City metropolitan area. The population was 5,627 at the 2010 census.

Pleasantville, Ohio Village in Ohio, United States

Pleasantville is a village in Fairfield County, Ohio, United States. The population was 960 at the 2010 census.

Applewold, Pennsylvania Borough in Pennsylvania, United States

Applewold is a borough in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 310 at the 2010 census.

North Bend, Wisconsin Town in Wisconsin, United States

North Bend is a town in Jackson County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 397 at the 2000 census. The unincorporated communities of Buckholz Corners and North Bend are located in the town.

Grant, Shawano County, Wisconsin Town in Wisconsin, United States

Grant is a town in Shawano County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 974 at the 2000 census. The unincorporated community of Caroline is located within the town, and it holds the town's fire station.

Marshfield is a town in Wood County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 811 at the 2000 census. Marshfield is also the name of a neighboring city: Marshfield, Wisconsin

Yorkshire (CDP), New York Census-designated place in New York, United States

Yorkshire is a census-designated place (CDP) in the northeastern corner of the town of Yorkshire in Cattaraugus County, New York, United States. The population of the CDP was 1,180 at the 2010 census, out of 3,913 in the town of Yorkshire as a whole.

Walton (town), New York Town in New York, United States

Walton is a town in Delaware County, New York, United States. The population was 5,576 at the 2010 census. The town is in the west-central part of the county and contains the village of Walton. The town claims to be the "Scarecrow Capital of the World."

Oljato-Monument Valley, Arizona Place in Arizona, United States

Oljato-Monument Valley is a census-designated place (CDP) in Navajo County, Arizona, United States. The population was 154 at the 2010 census.

References

  1. "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jul 18, 2017.
  2. 1 2 "Feature Detail Report for: Town of Snowflake". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey.
  3. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2014-08-23.
  4. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  5. History of Snowflake, AZ
  6. Thompson, George E. (2009). You Live Where?: Interesting and Unusual Facts about where We Live. iUniverse. p. 5.
  7. Gallant, Frank K. (2012). A Place Called Peculiar: Stories about Unusual American Place-Names. Courier Dover Publications. p. 18.
  8. "Snowflake(town) QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau". Quickfacts.census.gov. Retrieved December 8, 2013.
  9. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2016.
  10. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  11. Fred A. Bernstein (July 10, 2005). "In One Arizona Community, an Oasis in a Toxic World". The New York Times
  12. Kathleen Hale, Mae Ryan (July 11, 2016). "Allergic to life: the Arizona residents 'sensitive to the whole world'". The Guardian. Retrieved August 17, 2017.CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link)
  13. "Snowflake, AZ" (PDF). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration . Retrieved December 11, 2013.
  14. Jerome Clark. The UFO Book: Encyclopedia of the Extraterrestrial. Visible Ink, 1998 ISBN   1-57859-029-9
  15. Travis Walton. "Human?" travis-walton.com
  16. 'Marilyn Jarrett-obituary,' The Arizona Republic, March 16, 2006
  17. "archives.nypl.org -- Buzz Miller papers". Archives and Manuscripts. New York Public Library. Retrieved 2 December 2017.