Social Democratic Party (Luxembourg)

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Social Democratic Party
Parti Social Démocrate
President Henry Cravatte
Founded March 1971 [1]
Dissolved 1984
Ideology Social democracy

The Social Democratic Party (Luxembourgish : Sozialdemokratesch Partei, French : Parti Social Démocrate, German : Sozialdemokratische Partei), abbreviated to PSD, was a social democratic political party in Luxembourg, active between 1971 and 1984.

French language Romance language

French is a Romance language of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages of Northern Roman Gaul like Gallia Belgica and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders. Today, owing to France's past overseas expansion, there are numerous French-based creole languages, most notably Haitian Creole. A French-speaking person or nation may be referred to as Francophone in both English and French.

German language West Germanic language

German is a West Germanic language that is mainly spoken in Central Europe. It is the most widely spoken and official or co-official language in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, South Tyrol (Italy), the German-speaking Community of Belgium, and Liechtenstein. It is also one of the three official languages of Luxembourg and a co-official language in the Opole Voivodeship in Poland. The languages which are most similar to German are the other members of the West Germanic language branch: Afrikaans, Dutch, English, the Frisian languages, Low German/Low Saxon, Luxembourgish, and Yiddish. There are also strong similarities in vocabulary with Danish, Norwegian and Swedish, although those belong to the North Germanic group. German is the second most widely spoken Germanic language, after English.

Social democracy is a political, social and economic ideology that supports economic and social interventions to promote social justice within the framework of a liberal democratic polity and a capitalist economy. The protocols and norms used to accomplish this involve a commitment to representative and participatory democracy; measures for income redistribution and regulation of the economy in the general interest; and welfare state provisions. Social democracy thus aims to create the conditions for capitalism to lead to greater democratic, egalitarian and solidaristic outcomes. Due to longstanding governance by social democratic parties and their influence on socioeconomic policy development in the Nordic countries, in policy circles social democracy has become associated with the Nordic model in the latter part of the 20th century.

The PSD was founded in March 1971 as a secession of the right wing of the Luxembourg Socialist Workers' Party (LSAP) which had a centrist orientation. [1] The group left the LSAP in opposition to the rising leftist faction in the LSAP, which opposed forming coalitions with the Christian Social People's Party (CSV) and championed coalitions with the Communist Party at communal level. [2]

Luxembourg Socialist Workers Party political party in Luxembourg

The Luxembourg Socialist Workers' Party, abbreviated to LSAP or POSL, is a social-democratic political party in Luxembourg. The LSAP is the second-largest party in the Chamber of Deputies, having won 13 of 60 seats at the 2013 general election, and has one seat in the European Parliament. The LSAP is currently part of the Bettel-Schneider government, with Etienne Schneider of the LSAP serving as Deputy Prime Minister. Since March 2014 the party's President has been Claude Haagen.

In politics, centrism—the centre or the center —is a political outlook or specific position that involves acceptance or support of a balance of a degree of social equality and a degree of social hierarchy, while opposing political changes which would result in a significant shift of society strongly to either the left or the right.

Christian Social Peoples Party political party in Luxembourg

The Christian Social People's Party, abbreviated to CSV or PCS, is the largest political party in Luxembourg. The party follows a Christian-democratic ideology and, like most parties in Luxembourg, is strongly pro-European. The CSV is a member of the European People's Party (EPP) and the Centrist Democrat International (CDI).

The split was led by Henry Cravatte, who had been ejected as President of the LSAP in May 1970. In total, six of the LSAP's eighteen MPs joined the new party, including Albert Bousser and Astrid Lulling. One-sixth of the LSAP's communal councillors also defected. [3]

Henry Cravatte was a Luxembourgish politician. Cravatte was Deputy Prime Minister from 1964 until 1969, and also served as President of the Luxembourg Socialist Workers' Party.

Albert Bousser was a Luxembourgish politician, railway inspector, and trade unionist.

Astrid Lulling is a politician in Luxembourg, and was a Member of the European Parliament for the Christian Social People's Party, part of the European People's Party.

The party competed in the 1974 election, taking 9.2% of the vote and winning five seats, to draw level with the Communist Party, which had been the long-held fourth party in Luxembourgian politics. In that election, the LSAP formed a coalition with the Democratic Party. In 1979, the PSD lost three of their seats to a resurgent CSV. In the European election held on the same day, the PSD failed to win a seat, but did beat the Communist Party into fifth place.

Communist Party of Luxembourg political party in Luxembourg

The Communist Party of Luxembourg, abbreviated to KPL or PCL, is a communist party in Luxembourg.

Democratic Party (Luxembourg) political party in Luxembourg

The Democratic Party, abbreviated to DP, is the major liberal political party in Luxembourg. One of the three major parties, the DP sits on the centre-right, holding moderate market liberal views combined with a strong emphasis on civil liberties, human rights, and internationalism.

Before it fought another election, the party disbanded, in 1984. Some of its members, including Cravatte, returned to the LSAP, whilst others, such as Lulling, joined the CSV, [1] thereby completing their political metamorphosis from left to right.

Footnotes

  1. 1 2 3 Lucardie, A.P.M. "De Stiefkinderen van de Sociaal-Democrati" (PDF) (in Dutch).
  2. Mario, Hirsch (May 1980). "European elections: Luxembourg". West European Politics. 3 (2): 250–252. doi:10.1080/01402388008424281.
  3. Socialist affairs, Volumes 21-25. Socialist International. 1971. p. 46.

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