Solberg Inlet

Last updated

Solberg Inlet ( 68°19′S65°15′W / 68.317°S 65.250°W / -68.317; -65.250 Coordinates: 68°19′S65°15′W / 68.317°S 65.250°W / -68.317; -65.250 ) is an ice-filled inlet 5 to 10 nautical miles (18 km) wide, which recedes west 14 nautical miles (26 km) between Rock Pile Peaks and Joerg Peninsula, on the east coast of Graham Land. Discovered by members of the United States Antarctic Service (USAS) in 1940, it was resighted in 1947 by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition (RARE) under Ronne, who named it for Rear Admiral Thorvald A. Solberg, U.S. Navy, Chief of Naval Research, who was of assistance to the expedition.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document: "Solberg Inlet".(content from the Geographic Names Information System )  OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg


Related Research Articles

Ketchum Glacier is an eastward flowing glacier at the base of Palmer Land, Antarctica, about 50 nautical miles (90 km) long, descending between the Latady Mountains and the Scaife Mountains into Gardner Inlet. It was discovered by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition (RARE), 1947–48, under Finn Ronne, who named it for Commander Gerald Ketchum, U.S. Navy, commander of the icebreaker USS Burton Island (AG-88) which broke the ice to free the RARE from Marguerite Bay for the return home.

Irvine Glacier is a glacier, 40 miles (64 km) long, draining southeast between the Guettard Range and the Rare Range into the northern part of Gardner Inlet, Antarctica. It was discovered by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition (RARE), 1947–48, under Finn Ronne, who named it for George J. Irvine, of the Engineer Depot at Fort Belvoir, Virginia, who outlined the RARE photographic program.

Mill Inlet is an ice-filled inlet which recedes 8 nautical miles (15 km) in a northwesterly direction and is some 20 nautical miles (37 km) wide at its entrance between Cape Robinson and Monnier Point, along the east coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. It was charted by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in 1947 and named for Hugh Robert Mill. It was photographed from the air during 1947 by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition under Finn Ronne.

Daspit Glacier is a glacier 6 nautical miles (11 km) long, flowing east-northeast along the south side of Mount Shelby to the head of Trail Inlet, on the east coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. It was discovered by members of the East Base of the United States Antarctic Service, 1939–41, and was originally named Fleming Glacier after Rev. W.L.S. Fleming. It was photographed from the air in 1947 by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition under Finn Ronne, and charted in 1948 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey. It was renamed by Ronne for Captain Lawrence R. Daspit, U.S. Navy, who assisted in obtaining Navy support for the Ronne expedition, the original name being transferred to Fleming Glacier on the Rymill Coast.

Aphrodite Glacier is a glacier 15 nautical miles (28 km) long flowing north to the east coast of the Antarctic Peninsula 3 nautical miles (6 km) west of Victory Nunatak.

Mount Barkow is a mountain, 1,390 m, which stands 20 nautical miles (37 km) west of Court Nunatak and New Bedford Inlet and marks the east end of the ridge separating Haines Glacier and Meinardus Glacier, on the east side of Palmer Land. Discovered and photographed from the air in December 1940 by the United States Antarctic Service (USAS). Photographed from the air by Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition (RARE) under Ronne, who in conjunction with the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) mapped it from the ground in 1947. Named by the FIDS for Erich Barkow, German meteorologist and member of the German Antarctic Expedition, 1911–12, under Filchner.

Böhnecke Glacier is a steep glacier 3 nautical miles (6 km) wide, which flows southeast to the northwest side of Violante Inlet, on the east coast of Palmer Land. It was discovered and photographed from the air in December 1940 by members of the United States Antarctic Service. During 1947 the glacier was photographed from the air by members of the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition under Finn Ronne, who in conjunction with the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) charted it from the ground. It was named by FIDS for Gunther Böhnecke, a German oceanographer and a member of the German expedition in the Meteor, 1925–27.

Clifford Glacier is a broad glacier, about 40 nautical miles (70 km) long, flowing in an east-northeast direction to the gap between Mount Tenniel and the Eland Mountains, and then east to Smith Inlet on the east coast of Palmer Land. The upper part of this glacier was charted in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition under John Rymill; the seaward side by the United States Antarctic Service survey party which explored along this coast in 1940. During 1947 it was photographed from the air by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition under Finn Ronne, who in conjunction with the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) charted it from the ground. It was named in 1952 by the FIDS for Sir G. Miles Clifford, at that time Governor of the Falkland Islands.

Cronus Glacier is a glacier 6 nautical miles (11 km) long and 3 nautical miles (6 km) wide flowing northwest into Bowman Inlet between the Calypso Cliffs and Crabeater Point on the east coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. It was photographed by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition on December 22, 1947, and roughly surveyed by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in December 1958. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee after Cronus, the god of agriculture in Greek mythology.

Joerg Peninsula

Joerg Peninsula is a rugged, mountainous peninsula, 22 nautical miles (41 km) long in a northeast–southwest direction and from 3 to 10 nautical miles wide, lying between Trail Inlet and Solberg Inlet on the Bowman Coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. Its tip is indented by Hondius Inlet. The peninsula lies in the area explored from the air by Sir Hubert Wilkins in 1928 and Lincoln Ellsworth in 1935, and its south coast was mapped by W.L.G. Joerg from air photographs taken by Ellsworth. It was further mapped and photographed from the air by the United States Antarctic Service in 1940, and was surveyed by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in 1947. The peninsula was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee after W.L.G. Joerg (1885–1952), who was an American geographer, polar cartographer, and archivist, and who made important contributions to Antarctic cartography, nomenclature and history. Joerg was Chairman of the United States Board on Geographic Names Special Committee on Antarctic Names, 1943–47, and was a member of the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names, 1947–52.

Eden Glacier is a glacier 5 nautical miles (9 km) long, which flows in a southerly direction into the head of Cabinet Inlet, northwest of Lyttelton Ridge, on the east coast of Graham Land. It was charted by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) and photographed from the air by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition in 1947. It was named by the FIDS for Rt. Hon. Robert Anthony Eden, M.P., then British Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs and member of the War Cabinet.

The Mohn Peaks are two ice-covered peaks, the northern and southern being 1,275 and 1,230 metres high, respectively, standing 9 nautical miles (17 km) west-southwest of the head of Mason Inlet, on the east coast of Palmer Land, Antarctica. They were first seen and photographed from the air in December 1940 by the United States Antarctic Service. During 1947 the peaks were photographed from the air by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition under Finn Ronne, who in conjunction with the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) charted them from the ground. They were named by the FIDS for Norwegian meteorologist Henrik Mohn.

Fricker Glacier is a glacier, 10 nautical miles (19 km) long, which lies close north of Tindal Bluff and Monnier Point and flows in a northeasterly direction into the southwest side of Mill Inlet, on the east coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. It was charted by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) and photographed from the air by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition in 1947, and was named by the FIDS for Karl Fricker, a German Antarctic historian.

Matheson Glacier is a glacier 11 nautical miles (20 km) long, lying 2 nautical miles (4 km) south of Ashton Glacier, which it parallels, and flowing in an easterly direction to the west side of Lehrke Inlet, on the east coast of Palmer Land, Antarctica. It was first sighted by members of the United States Antarctic Service who explored this coast by land and from the air in December 1940, and was first charted by a joint party consisting of members of the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition and Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) in 1947. The glacier was named by the FIDS for J. Matheson, a member of the FIDS at the Port Lockroy and Hope Bay bases, 1944–46.

McClary Glacier is a glacier 10 nautical miles (19 km) long and 2 nautical miles (4 km) wide on the west coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. It flows southwest along the north side of Butson Ridge into Marguerite Bay between Cape Calmette and the Debenham Islands. The glacier was first roughly surveyed by the British Graham Land Expedition, 1936–37, and resurveyed by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, 1946–50. It was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for George B. McClary, father of Nelson McClary, mate on the Port of Beaumont during the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition, 1947–48.

Sleipnir Glacier

Sleipnir Glacier is a glacier 10 nautical miles (18 km) long, flowing into the west side of Cabinet Inlet between Balder and Spur Points, on the east coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. The Vologes Ridge is in the central portion of the glacier.

Keller Inlet is an ice-filled inlet 12 nautical miles (22 km) long, in a northeast–southwest direction, and 6 nautical miles (11 km) wide, between Cape Little and Cape Fiske, along the east coast of Palmer Land, Antarctica. This inlet was photographed from the air by members of the United States Antarctic Service in December 1940, and in 1947 by members of the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition under Finn Ronne, who in conjunction with the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey charted it from the ground. It was amed by Ronne for Louis Keller of Beaumont, Texas, who contributed supplies to Ronne's expedition.

Revelle Inlet is a broad, ice-filled inlet which recedes west some 15 nautical miles (28 km) between Cape Agassiz and Cape Keeler, along the east coast of Palmer Land. The inlet lies in the area explored from the air by Sir Hubert Wilkins in 1928 and Lincoln Ellsworth in 1935, but it was first charted by the United States Antarctic Service (USAS) in 1940. It was resighted by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition (RARE), 1947–48, under Ronne, who named it for Roger Revelle, oceanographer at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, who gave technical assistance during the fitting out of the Ronne expedition.

Robillard Glacier is a narrow glacier flowing east-northeast and entering the north side of the head of Solberg Inlet, on the east coast of Graham Land. It was discovered by members of East Base of the United States Antarctic Service (USAS), 1939–41, and was photographed from the air in 1947 by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition (RARE), under Ronne, and charted in 1948 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS). It was named by Ronne for Captain George Robillard, U.S. Navy, of the legal section of the Bureau of Ships, who assisted in gaining Congressional support which resulted in procuring the expedition ship.

Wilson Pass is a glacier pass at about 400 m, running NW-SE between Bowditch Crests and Rock Pile Peaks on Bermel Peninsula, Bowman Coast of Antarctica. The pass leads from Solberg Inlet to Mobiloil Inlet. The feature was photographed from the air by Lincoln Ellsworth, 1935, the United States Antarctic Service (USAS), 1939–41, and Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition (RARE), 1947–48. Named after Alison Wilson, of the Center for Polar Archives, National Archives, Washington, DC, who has been associated with Antarctic research from 1957; member, U.S. Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names, 1974–94; Chair, 1986–93.