Sorrell Booke

Last updated

Sorrell Booke
Sorrell Booke in an acting headshot photo.jpg
1974 publicity photo
Born(1930-01-04)January 4, 1930
DiedFebruary 11, 1994(1994-02-11) (aged 64)
Sherman Oaks, California, U.S.
Resting place Hillside Memorial Park Cemetery
Education Columbia University (BA)
Yale University (MFA)
OccupationActor
Years active1952–1994
Spouse(s)Miranda Knickerbocker (1958–1973; divorced)
Children2
Military career
AllegianceFlag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States
Service/branchFlag of the United States Army (official proportions).svg  United States Army
RankLieutenant
Battles/wars Korean War

Sorrell Booke (January 4, 1930 – February 11, 1994) was an American actor who performed on stage, screen, and television. He is best known for his role as corrupt politician Jefferson Davis "Boss" Hogg in the television show The Dukes of Hazzard . [1]

Jefferson Davis 'J.D.' Hogg, known as Boss Hogg, is a fictional character featured in the American television series The Dukes of Hazzard. He was the greedy, unethical commissioner of Hazzard County. A stereotypical villainous glutton, Boss Hogg almost always wore an all-white suit with a white cowboy hat and regularly smoked cigars. His namesake is Jefferson Davis, the President of the Confederate States of America. Boss Hogg is one of only two characters to appear in every episode of the TV series, the other being Uncle Jesse Duke. The role of Boss Hogg was played by Sorrell Booke, who performed frequently on radio, stage, and film prior to his role in The Dukes of Hazzard.

<i>The Dukes of Hazzard</i> American television series

The Dukes of Hazzard was an American action-comedy television series that aired on CBS from January 26, 1979, to February 8, 1985. The show aired for a total of 147 episodes spanning seven seasons. The series was inspired by the 1975 film Moonrunners, which was also created by Gy Waldron and had many identical or similar character names and concepts.

Contents

Early life and education

Booke was born in Buffalo, New York, a cousin of Woodstock farmer Max Yasgur. He attended Bennett High School in Buffalo and was valedictorian of his class of 1948. Growing up, Booke was known for his impersonations and appeared regularly as an actor on local radio stations WGR and WEBR. [2] He later earned degrees from both Columbia and Yale universities. He served in the United States Army during the Korean War as a counterintelligence officer. [1]

Buffalo, New York City in Western New York

Buffalo is the second largest city in the U.S. state of New York and the largest city in Western New York. As of 2017, the population was 258,612. The city is the county seat of Erie County and a major gateway for commerce and travel across the Canada–United States border, forming part of the bi-national Buffalo Niagara Region.

Max Yasgur American farmer who leased land for Woodstock

Max B. Yasgur was an American farmer, best known as the owner of the dairy farm in Bethel, New York, at which the Woodstock Music and Art Fair was held between August 15 and August 18, 1969.

Bennett High School (Buffalo, New York)

Bennett High School was an American high school located in the University Heights section of Buffalo, New York. It was named for Lewis J. Bennett, who donated the land for the school and for All High Stadium. Portions of the movie The Natural were filmed in All High Stadium, although it was filmed as Wrigley Field. Bennett High School formerly was a Exam/Magnet school with three College Prep programs, the Academy of International LawBusiness and Computers, and Education and the Arts.

Career

Booke came to Hollywood via a theatre degree from Yale University and a decade on the New York Stage. One prominent early role was that of Senator Billboard T. Rawkins in the 1960 revival of Finian's Rainbow , a role foreshadowing his most famous character, that of Boss Hogg in The Dukes of Hazzard. During his early Hollywood acting career, Booke gained acclaim for notable supporting parts in noteworthy 1960s films such as Black Like Me , A Fine Madness , and Fail-Safe . In 1962, he was in Fiorello! and starred as the namesake's character.

Yale University private research university in New Haven, Connecticut, United States

Yale University is a private Ivy League research university in New Haven, Connecticut. Founded in 1701, it is the third-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and one of the nine Colonial Colleges chartered before the American Revolution.

<i>Finians Rainbow</i> 1947 musical

Finian's Rainbow is a musical with a book by E.Y. Harburg and Fred Saidy, lyrics by Harburg, and music by Burton Lane, produced by Lee Sabinson. The original 1947 Broadway production ran for 725 performances, while a film version was released in 1968 and several revivals have followed.

<i>Black Like Me</i> book by John Howard Griffin

Black Like Me, first published in 1961, is a nonfiction book by white journalist John Howard Griffin recounting his journey in the Deep South of the United States, at a time when African-Americans lived under racial segregation. Griffin was a native of Mansfield, Texas, who had his skin temporarily darkened to pass as a black man. He traveled for six weeks throughout the racially segregated states of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Arkansas, and Georgia to explore life from the other side of the color line. Sepia Magazine financed the project in exchange for the right to print the account first as a series of articles.

In 1965, he guest starred as Sgt. Herschel Aronson in episode 19 "Faith, Hope, and Sergeant Aronson" of ABC's 12 O-Clock High military drama. He soon began focusing primarily on television roles in the 1970s and 1980s, and voice acting roles in the 1980s and early 1990s. Booke also once conducted the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra.

American Broadcasting Company American broadcast television network

The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American commercial broadcast television network that is a flagship property of Walt Disney Television, a subsidiary of the Disney Media Networks division of The Walt Disney Company. The network is headquartered in Burbank, California on Riverside Drive, directly across the street from Walt Disney Studios and adjacent to the Roy E. Disney Animation Building, But the network's second corporate headquarters and News headquarters remains in New York City, New York at their broadcast center on 77 West 66th Street in Lincoln Square in Upper West Side Manhattan.

<i>Twelve OClock High</i> (TV series) television series

12 O'Clock High is an American drama series set in World War II. This TV series was originally broadcast on ABC-TV for two-and-one-half TV seasons from September 18, 1964, through January 13, 1967; it was based on the motion picture Twelve O'Clock High (1949). The series was a co-production of 20th Century Fox Television and QM Productions. This show is one of the two QM shows not to display a copyright notice at the beginning, but rather at the end and the only one not to display the standard "A QM Production" closing card on the closing credits.

Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra non-profit organisation in the USA

The Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra is an American symphony orchestra located in Buffalo, New York. Its primary performing venue is Kleinhans Music Hall, which is a National Historic Landmark. Its regular concert season features gala concerts, classics programming of core repertoire, pops concerts, educational youth concerts and family concerts. During the summer months, the orchestra performs at many parks and outdoor venues across Western New York.

Booke earned an Emmy nomination for his appearance in Dr. Kildare in the episode "What's God to Julius?". He appeared in an episode of Mission: Impossible from the first season in 1966. Booke appeared in two early episodes of M*A*S*H , as General Barker in "Requiem for a Lightweight" and "Chief Surgeon Who?"; the latter marked the debut of the character Corporal Klinger, with whom Booke's character had previously dealt.

An Emmy Award, or simply Emmy, is an American award that recognizes excellence in the television industry, and is the equivalent of an Academy Award, the Tony Award, and the Grammy Award.

<i>Dr. Kildare</i> (TV series) television series

Dr. Kildare is an NBC medical drama television series which originally ran from September 28, 1961, until August 30, 1966, for a total of 191 episodes over five seasons. Produced by MGM Television, it was based on fictional doctor characters originally created by author Max Brand in the 1930s and previously used by MGM in a popular film series and radio drama. The TV series quickly achieved success and made a star of Richard Chamberlain, who played the title role. Dr. Kildare inspired or influenced many later TV shows dealing with the medical field.

<i>Mission: Impossible</i> television series 1966

Mission: Impossible is an American television series, created and initially produced by Bruce Geller, chronicling the exploits of a team of secret government agents known as the Impossible Missions Force (IMF). In the first season the team is led by Dan Briggs, played by Steven Hill; Jim Phelps, played by Peter Graves, takes charge for the remaining seasons. Each episode opens with a fast-paced montage that unfolds as the series' theme music composed by Lalo Schifrin plays, after which in a prologue Briggs or Phelps receives his instructions from a voice delivered on a recording which then self-destructs.

He also had a recurring role in All in the Family as Mr. Sanders, personnel manager at Archie Bunker's workplace, Prendergast Tool and Die Company. (He had previously appeared on All in the Family as Lyle Bennett, the manager of a local television station.) Booke was featured on an episode of Good Times , and had a recurring role as the Jewish mob boss "Lefkowitz" on Soap .

<i>All in the Family</i> American television series

All in the Family is an American sitcom TV-series that was originally broadcast on the CBS television network for nine seasons, from January 12, 1971 to April 8, 1979. The following September, it was continued with the spin-off series Archie Bunker's Place, which picked up where All in the Family had ended and ran for four more seasons through 1983.

Archie Bunker fictional character

Archibald "Archie" Bunker is a fictional character from the 1970s American television sitcom All in the Family and its spin-off Archie Bunker's Place, played by Carroll O'Connor. Bunker, a main character of the series, is a World War II veteran, blue-collar worker, and family man. Described as a "lovable bigot", he was first seen by the American public when All in the Family premiered on January 12, 1971, where he was depicted as the head of the Bunker family. In 1979, the show was retooled and renamed Archie Bunker's Place; it finally went off the air in 1983. Bunker lived at the fictional address of 704 Hauser Street in the borough of Queens, in New York City.

<i>Good Times</i> American television sitcom

Good Times is an American sitcom that aired for six seasons on CBS from February 8, 1974, to August 1, 1979. Created by Eric Monte and Mike Evans, and developed by Norman Lear, the series' primary executive producer, it was television's first African American two-parent family sitcom. Good Times is a spin-off of Maude, which was itself a spin-off of All in the Family.

The Dukes of Hazzard (1979–1985)

Booke's most notable role was in The Dukes of Hazzard as the humorously wicked antagonist to Bo and Luke Duke. The series ran on CBS for seven seasons, from 1979 to 1985 and spawned an animated series, The Dukes (1983), two reunion TV specials (by which time Booke had died, and the character of Boss Hogg was also said to be deceased), a feature film (2005) and The Dukes of Hazzard: The Beginning (a 2007 TV movie).

Booke had stopped appearing physically in acting roles, but he continued to perform voice work on several television shows and movies, occasionally as narrator, and sometimes as a cartoon character's voice, in such movies as Scooby-Doo Meets the Boo Brothers (1987 TV movie), Gravedale High (1990 television series), and Rock-A-Doodle (1991).

Personal life

Booke was married to Miranda Knickerbocker (the daughter of Hubert Renfro Knickerbocker) from 1958 to 1973. They had two children, Alexandra and Nicholas. Booke has a brother, Fred.

Death

On February 11, 1994, Booke died of colorectal cancer in Sherman Oaks, California. He is interred at the Hillside Memorial Park Cemetery in Culver City, California. His tombstone reads, "Beloved Pa, Grandpa, Brother and Boss."

Partial filmography

Television work

Stage appearances

See also

Related Research Articles

<i>The Dukes</i> (TV series) television series

The Dukes is a 30-minute Saturday morning animated series based on the live-action television series The Dukes of Hazzard which aired on CBS from February 5 to October 29, 1983. The series was produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions in association with Warner Bros. Television, producer of the original series.

Daisy Duke fictional character

Daisy Duke is a fictional character, played by Catherine Bach, from the American television series The Dukes of Hazzard. She is the cousin of Bo and Luke, the main protagonists of the show, and the three live on a farm on the outskirts of Hazzard County with their Uncle Jesse.

Sonny Shroyer actor

Otis Burt "Sonny" Shroyer, Jr. is an American actor who has appeared in various television and movie roles. He is known for his role as Deputy Sheriff Enos Strate in the television series The Dukes of Hazzard. He also starred in a spin-off called Enos based on his Dukes of Hazzard character. Shroyer is married and has two sons, Chris and Mark.

<i>The Dukes of Hazzard</i> (film) 2005 film by Jay Chandrasekhar

The Dukes of Hazzard is a 2005 American buddy comedy road film based on the television series, The Dukes of Hazzard. The film was directed by Jay Chandrasekhar and released on August 5, 2005, by Warner Bros. Pictures. As in the television series, the film depicts the adventures of cousins Bo, Luke, and Daisy, and their Uncle Jesse, as they outfox crooked Hazzard County Commissioner Boss Hogg and Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane.

Kenneth Mars American actor

Kenneth Mars was an American actor and voice actor, who specialized in comedic roles. He had roles in two Mel Brooks films: as the Nazi playwright Franz Liebkind in The Producers (1968) and Police Inspector Hans Wilhelm Friedrich Kemp in Young Frankenstein (1974).

The Iceman Cometh is a play written by American playwright Eugene O'Neill in 1939. First published in 1946, the play premiered on Broadway at the Martin Beck Theatre on October 9, 1946, directed by Eddie Dowling, where it ran for 136 performances before closing on March 15, 1947.

James Best American actor, musician, artist

Jewel Franklin Guy, known professionally as James Best, was an American television, film, stage, and voice actor, as well as a writer, director, acting coach, artist, college professor, and musician. During a career that spanned more than 60 years, he performed not only in feature films but also in scores of television series, as well as appearing on various country music programs and talk shows. Television audiences, however, perhaps most closely associate Best with his role as the bumbling Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane in the action-comedy series The Dukes of Hazzard, which originally aired on CBS between 1979 and 1985. He reprised the role in 1997 and 2000 for the made-for-television movies The Dukes of Hazzard: Reunion! and The Dukes of Hazzard: Hazzard in Hollywood (2000).

Richard Douglas Hurst is an American actor who portrayed Deputy Cletus Hogg, Boss Hogg's cousin, in the 1980 to 1983 seasons of The Dukes of Hazzard as well as The Dukes of Hazzard: Reunion! in 1997 and The Dukes of Hazzard: Hazzard in Hollywood in 2000.

Leonard Stone actor

Leonard Stone was an American character actor who played supporting roles in over 120 television shows and 35 films.

Luke Duke fictional character from The Dukes of Hazzard

Lucas K. "Luke" Duke was born on November 6, 1951, Luke is a fictional character in the American television series The Dukes of Hazzard which ran from 1979 to 1985. Luke was played by Tom Wopat.

Jolene Hunnicutt is a fictional character in the television series Alice. She was played by theater actress Celia Weston.

Morgan Woodward American actor

Thomas Morgan Woodward was an American actor, best known for his recurring role on the soap opera Dallas as Marvin "Punk" Anderson. He also played Boss Godfrey in Cool Hand Luke (1967), the silent, sunglasses-wearing "man with no eyes", and he had the most guest appearances on Gunsmoke at 19 episodes.

<i>The Dukes of Hazzard: Reunion!</i> 1997 television film directed by Lewis Teague

The Dukes of Hazzard: Reunion! is a 1997 American made-for-television action-adventure film reuniting the surviving cast members of the 1979–1985 television series The Dukes of Hazzard which originally aired on CBS on April 25, 1997. The film was directed by Lewis Teague, written by series creator Gy Waldron, and produced by Ira Marvin and Skip Ward.

Sorrell may refer to:

The Dukes of Hazzard: Hazzard in Hollywood is a 2000 American made-for-television action-adventure comedy film based on the 1979–1985 television series The Dukes of Hazzard which aired on CBS on May 19, 2000.

Herb Voland American actor

Herbert Maurice Voland was an American actor, best known for his various roles on the sitcom Bewitched, as General Crandell Clayton on the sitcom M*A*S*H during seasons one and two, and the film Airplane! (1980).

Rosco Purvis Coltrane is a fictional bumbling and corrupt sheriff character in the American TV series The Dukes of Hazzard along with the movie Moonrunners and the movies that followed. He is the right-hand man of Hazzard County's corrupt county commissioner, Jefferson Davis "J.D." Hogg.

John McLiam was a film and television actor noted for his skill at different accents. His film appearances include My Fair Lady (1964), In Cold Blood (1967), John Frankenheimer's movie of The Iceman Cometh (1973), The Missouri Breaks (1976), and First Blood (1982). He was a guest star in numerous television series and wrote a Broadway play, The Sin of Pat Muldoon.

References

  1. 1 2 Collins, Glenn (February 15, 1994). "Sorrell Booke, A TV Actor, 64; Was Boss Hogg". The New York Times . Archived from the original on May 13, 2013. Retrieved January 31, 2011.
  2. Cichon, Steve (March 22, 2019). "The curious acquaintance of John Otto and Boss Hogg". The Buffalo News . Retrieved March 22, 2019.