South African National Census of 2001

Last updated
2001 National Census
ZA Census 2001 Logo.png
General information
Country Republic of South Africa
Date taken9 October 2001 (2001-10-09)
Total population44,819,778
Percent change9.92% Increase2.svg
Most populous region KwaZulu-Natal
Least populous region Northern Cape

The National Census of 2001 was the 2nd comprehensive national census of the Republic of South Africa, or Post-Apartheid South Africa. It undertook to enumerate every person present in South Africa on the census night between 9–10 October 2001 at a cost of R 987,000,000. [1]

Census Acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population

A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. This term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include traditional culture, business, supplies, and traffic censuses. The United Nations defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every 10 years. United Nations recommendations also cover census topics to be collected, official definitions, classifications and other useful information to co-ordinate international practices.

South Africa Republic in the southernmost part of Africa

South Africa, officially the Republic of South Africa (RSA), is the southernmost country in Africa. It is bounded to the south by 2,798 kilometres (1,739 mi) of coastline of Southern Africa stretching along the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans; to the north by the neighbouring countries of Namibia, Botswana, and Zimbabwe; and to the east and northeast by Mozambique and Eswatini (Swaziland); and it surrounds the enclaved country of Lesotho. South Africa is the largest country in Southern Africa and the 25th-largest country in the world by land area and, with over 57 million people, is the world's 24th-most populous nation. It is the southernmost country on the mainland of the Old World or the Eastern Hemisphere. About 80 percent of South Africans are of Bantu ancestry, divided among a variety of ethnic groups speaking different African languages, nine of which have official status. The remaining population consists of Africa's largest communities of European, Asian (Indian), and multiracial (Coloured) ancestry.

Apartheid System of institutionalised racial segregation that existed in South Africa and South West Africa (Namibia) from 1948 until the early 1990s

Apartheid was a system of institutionalised racial segregation that existed in South Africa and South West Africa (Namibia) from 1948 until the early 1990s. Apartheid was characterised by an authoritarian political culture based on baasskap, which encouraged state repression of Black African, Coloured, and Asian South Africans for the benefit of the nation's minority white population. The economic legacy and social effects of apartheid continue to the present day.

Contents

It was organised and planned by Statistics South Africa in terms of the Statistics Act from the beginning of 1999, under the commission of the Statistician-General Pali Lehohla. The enumeration primarily took place from 10 to 31 October 2001 and the results were published in 2003. [2]

Statistics South Africa is the national statistical service of South Africa, with the goal of producing timely, accurate, and official statistics in order to advance economic growth, development, and democracy. To this end, Statistics South Africa produces official demographic, economic, and social censuses and surveys. To date, Statistics South Africa has produced three censuses, in 1996, 2001 as well as the results of the 2011 Census were released. Stats SA was previously known as the "Central Statistical Service"; shortly after the end of apartheid it absorbed the statistical services of the former Transkei, Bophuthatswana, Venda and Ciskei.

Pre-enumeration

Questionnaire A ZA Census 2001.jpg
Questionnaire A
Questionnaire B ZA Census 2001 B.jpg
Questionnaire B

This was the first South African census to use a Geographic Information System to determine the Enumeration Areas. Traditionally, the areas were created using analogue and sketch maps. This geographic database was created out of several data sets acquired from government departments and private sector companies. It included topographic maps, cadastral data, administrative boundaries, aerial photography, satellite imagery and videography. [3] Each area was classified according to its location as one of four types:

A geographic information system (GIS) is a system designed to capture, store, manipulate, analyze, manage, and present spatial or geographic data. GIS applications are tools that allow users to create interactive queries, analyze spatial information, edit data in maps, and present the results of all these operations. GIS sometimes refers to geographic information science (GIScience), the science underlying geographic concepts, applications, and systems.

The country was divided into approximately 80,000 manageable "pockets of land" with an average of 150 living spaces in each Enumeration Area. The intention was that each area could be handled by a single enumerator, to allow every household in the country to be visited within the timeframe provided. [4]

The census questionnaire was developed and tested on a computer-based census administration system at the end of 2000. The main pilot for the census was conducted in February and March 2001, all aspects of enumeration were tested. It resulted in many revisions of both processes and management methods. The 1996 census questionnaire was used as a basis, with some key differences in labour related questions. [5] [6] Three questionaries were printed:

South African National Census of 1996

The National Census of 1996 was the 1st comprehensive national census of the Republic of South Africa, after the fall of apartheid. It undertook to enumerate every person present in South Africa on the census night at a cost of R419,000,000.

Enumeration

Data Processing

As the 2001 Census was paper-based, an enormous amount of data needed to be converted to a digital format. The task of data processing consists of primarily four parts: data capture, post-data capture, coding and product generation.

Data processing is, generally, "the collection and manipulation of items of data to produce meaningful information." In this sense it can be considered a subset of information processing, "the change (processing) of information in any manner detectable by an observer."

In the social sciences, coding is an analytical process in which data, in both quantitative form or qualitative form are categorized to facilitate analysis.

Over 1000 temporary staff members were employed by Statistics South Africa to assist in the process. These employees worked in shifts, 7 days a week for almost 18 months. In total, 10 249 185 questionnaires were received which resulted in the generation of over 117 million images once scanned.

Post-enumeration Survey (PES)

Results

The census population results revealed 44.8 million people live in a 1,219,090 square kilometres (470,690 sq mi) area, that is 36.8 inhabitants per square kilometre (95/sq mi). [7]

Demographics

Population change in the South Africa by race [8]
RankRace1996 Census2001 CensusChangePercent
change
1 Steady2.svg Black African 31,127,63135,416,1664,288,535Increase2.svg12.89% Increase2.svg
2 Steady2.svg White 4,434,6974,293,640141,057Decrease2.svg3.23% Decrease2.svg
3 Steady2.svg Coloured 3,600,4463,994,505394,059Increase2.svg10.38% Increase2.svg
4 Steady2.svg Asian or Indian 1,045,5961,115,46769,871Increase2.svg6.47% Increase2.svg
Total population40,583,57344,819,7784,236,205Increase2.svg9.92% Increase2.svg
Population change in the South Africa by language [9]
RankFirst language1996 Census2001 CensusChangePercent
change
1 Steady2.svg IsiZulu 9,200,14410,677,3051,477,161Increase2.svg14.86% Increase2.svg
2 Steady2.svg IsiXhosa 7,196,1187,907,153711,035Increase2.svg9.42% Increase2.svg
3 Steady2.svg Afrikaans 5,811,5475,983,426171,879Increase2.svg2.91% Increase2.svg
4 Steady2.svg Sepedi 3,695,8464,208,980513,134Increase2.svg12.98% Increase2.svg
5 Increase2.svg Setswana 3,301,7743,677,016375,242Increase2.svg10.75% Increase2.svg
6 Decrease2.svg English 3,457,4673,673,203215,736Increase2.svg6.05% Increase2.svg
7 Steady2.svg Sesotho 3,104,1973,555,186450,989Increase2.svg13.54% Increase2.svg
8 Steady2.svg Xitsonga 1,756,1051,992,207236,102Increase2.svg12.60% Increase2.svg
9 Steady2.svg SiSwati 1,013,1931,194,430181,237Increase2.svg16.42% Increase2.svg
10 Steady2.svg Tshivenda 876,4091,021,757145,348Increase2.svg15.31% Increase2.svg
11 Steady2.svg IsiNdebele 586,961711,821124,860Increase2.svg19.23% Increase2.svg
12 Steady2.svg Other 228,275217,29310,982Decrease2.svg4.93% Decrease2.svg
Population change in the South Africa by gender [10]
RankGender1996 Census2001 CensusChangePercent
change
1 Steady2.svgFemale21,062,68523,385,7372,323,052Increase2.svg10.45% Increase2.svg
2 Steady2.svgMale19,520,88721,434,0401,913,153Increase2.svg9.34% Increase2.svg
Population change in the South Africa by province [11]
RankProvince1996 Census2001 CensusChangePercent
change
1 Steady2.svg KwaZulu-Natal 8,417,0219,426,0171,008,996Increase2.svg11.31% Increase2.svg
2 Steady2.svg Gauteng 7,348,4238,837,1781,488,755Increase2.svg18.40% Increase2.svg
3 Steady2.svg Eastern Cape 6,302,5256,436,763134,238Increase2.svg2.11% Increase2.svg
4 Steady2.svg Limpopo 4,929,3685,273,642344,274Increase2.svg6.75% Increase2.svg
5 Steady2.svg Western Cape 3,956,8754,524,335567,460Increase2.svg13.38% Increase2.svg
6 Steady2.svg North West 3,354,8253,669,349314,524Increase2.svg8.96% Increase2.svg
7 Steady2.svg Mpumalanga 2,800,7113,122,990322,279Increase2.svg10.88% Increase2.svg
8 Steady2.svg Free State 2,633,5042,706,77573,271Increase2.svg2.74% Increase2.svg
9 Steady2.svg Northern Cape 840,321822,72717,594Decrease2.svg2.16% Decrease2.svg
Total population40,583,57344,819,7784,236,205Increase2.svg9.92% Increase2.svg

See also

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References

  1. Using the 2001 Census: Approaches to analysing data (PDF). Statistics South Africa and the Human Sciences Research Council. 2007. ISBN   978-0-621-37259-5 . Retrieved 24 November 2015.
  2. Census 2001: Metadata. Statistics South Africa. 2003. Retrieved 24 November 2015.
  3. How the count was done (PDF). Statistics South Africa. 2003. pp. 9–10. ISBN   0-621-34294-7 . Retrieved 24 November 2015.
  4. Census in brief (PDF). Statistics South Africa. 2003. p. iv. ISBN   0-621-34293-9 . Retrieved 24 November 2015.
  5. How the count was done (PDF). Statistics South Africa. 2003. pp. 11–13. ISBN   0-621-34294-7 . Retrieved 24 November 2015.
  6. Cronje, Marius; Budlender, Debbie. "Comparing Census 1996 with Census 2001: An operational perspective" (PDF). Southern African Journal of Demography. 9 (1): 67–90. Retrieved 24 November 2015.
  7. Census in brief (PDF). Statistics South Africa. 2003. ISBN   0-621-34293-9 . Retrieved 24 November 2015.
  8. Primary tables South Africa: Census '96 and 2001 compared (PDF). Statistics South Africa. 2004. pp. 4–5. ISBN   0-621-34320-X . Retrieved 24 November 2015.
  9. Primary tables South Africa: Census '96 and 2001 compared (PDF). Statistics South Africa. 2004. pp. 9–12. ISBN   0-621-34320-X . Retrieved 24 November 2015.
  10. Primary tables South Africa: Census '96 and 2001 compared (PDF). Statistics South Africa. 2004. pp. 20–23. ISBN   0-621-34320-X . Retrieved 24 November 2015.
  11. Primary tables South Africa: Census '96 and 2001 compared (PDF). Statistics South Africa. 2004. pp. 4–5. ISBN   0-621-34320-X . Retrieved 24 November 2015.