South Hamgyong Province

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South Hamgyong Province

함경남도
Korean transcription(s)
   Chosŏn'gŭl 함경남도
   Hancha 咸鏡南道
  McCune-ReischauerHamgyŏngnam-do
  Revised RomanizationHamgyeongnam-do
Hamgyongnam-do in North Korea.svg
CountryFlag of North Korea.svg  North Korea
Region Kwannam
Capital Hamhung
Subdivisions3 cities; 15 counties
Government
  Party Committee ChairmanKim Chol-Sam [1] (WPK)
  People's Committee Chairman Kim Bong-yong [2]
Area
  Total18,970 km2 (7,320 sq mi)
Population
 (2008) [3]
  Total3,066,013
  Density160/km2 (420/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+9 (Pyongyang Time)
Dialect Hamgyong

South Hamgyong Province (Korean : 함경남도, Hamgyŏngnamdo; Korean pronunciation:  [ham.ɡjʌŋ.nam.do] ) is a province of North Korea. The province was formed in 1896 from the southern half of the former Hamgyong Province, remained a province of Korea until 1945, then became a province of North Korea. Its capital is Hamhung.

Contents

Geography

The province is bordered by Ryanggang to the north, North Hamgyong to the northeast, Kangwon to the south, and South Pyongan to the west. On the east of the province is the Sea of Japan (known as the "East Sea of Korea" in North Korea).

Administrative divisions

South Hamgyong is divided into 3 cities ("si"), 2 districts (1 "gu" and 1 "chigu"), and 15 counties ("gun"). [4] These are further divided into villages ( ri and dong , with dong also denoting neighborhoods in cities), with each county additionally having one town ( up ) which acts as its administrative center. These are detailed on each county's individual page. Some cities are also divided into wards known as "guyok", which are administered just below the city level and also listed on the individual page.

Cities

Districts

Counties

See also

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References

  1. "16th Meeting of Political Bureau of 7th Central Committee of WPK Held". Pyongyang: Rodong Sinmun. August 2020. Retrieved 17 August 2020.
  2. "Organizational Chart of North Korean Leadership" (PDF). Seoul: Political and Military Analysis Division, Intelligence and Analysis Bureau; Ministry of Unification. January 2018. Retrieved 17 October 2018.
  3. "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-05-14. Retrieved 2010-03-31.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. "북한지역정보넷".

Coordinates: 40°14′24″N127°31′52″E / 40.240°N 127.531°E / 40.240; 127.531