South Korea women's national football team

Last updated

Korea Republic
Emblem of Korea Football Association.svg
Nickname(s) Taegeuk Nangja (Taegeuk Ladies)
Association Korea Football Association
Confederation AFC (Asia)
Sub-confederation EAFF (East Asia)
Head coachvacant
Captain Cho So-hyun
Most caps Cho So-hyun (124) [1]
Top scorer Ji So-yun (54) [1]
FIFA code KOR
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First colours
Kit left arm kor18a.png
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Kit body kor18a.png
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Kit right arm kor18a.png
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Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 20 Decrease2.svg 6 (12 July 2019) [2]
Highest14 (December 2017, September 2018–March 2019)
Lowest26 (August 2004)
First international
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 13–1 South Korea  Flag of South Korea (1984-1997).svg
(Seoul, South Korea; 6 September 1990)
Biggest win
Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg  South Korea 19–0 Northern Mariana Islands  Flag of the Northern Mariana Islands.svg
(Tainan County, Taiwan; 26 August 2009)
Biggest defeat
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 13–1 South Korea  Flag of South Korea (1984-1997).svg
(Seoul, South Korea; 6 September 1990)
World Cup
Appearances3 (first in 2003 )
Best resultRound of 16 (2015)
Asian Cup
Appearances12 (first in 1991 )
Best resultThird place (2003)

The South Korea women's national football team (Korean : 대한민국 여자 축구 국가대표팀; Hanja : 大韓民國女子蹴球國家代表팀) represents South Korea in international women's football competitions. The team is referred to as the Korea Republic by FIFA. Its first game was a match against Japan in 1990, which it lost 13–1. Since then, it has qualified for three FIFA World Cups, in 2003, 2015, and 2019.

Korean language Language spoken in Korea

The Korean language is an East Asian language spoken by about 77 million people. It is a member of the Koreanic language family and is the official and national language of both Koreas: North Korea and South Korea, with different standardized official forms used in each country. It is also one of the two official languages in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County of Jilin province, China. It is also spoken in parts of Sakhalin, Ukraine, and Central Asia.

Hanja Korean language characters of Chinese origin

Hanja is the Korean name for Chinese characters. More specifically, it refers to the Chinese characters borrowed from Chinese and incorporated into the Korean language with Korean pronunciation. Hanja-mal or Hanja-eo refers to words that can be written with Hanja, and hanmun refers to Classical Chinese writing, although "Hanja" is sometimes used loosely to encompass these other concepts. Because Hanja never underwent major reform, they are almost entirely identical to traditional Chinese and kyūjitai characters, though the stroke orders for some characters are slightly different. For example, the characters and are written as 敎 and 硏. Only a small number of Hanja characters are modified or unique to Korean. By contrast, many of the Chinese characters currently in use in Japan and Mainland China have been simplified, and contain fewer strokes than the corresponding Hanja characters.

South Korea Republic in East Asia

South Korea is a country in East Asia, constituting the southern part of the Korean Peninsula and sharing a land border with North Korea. The name Korea is derived from Goguryeo which was one of the great powers in East Asia during its time, ruling most of the Korean Peninsula, Manchuria, parts of the Russian Far East and Inner Mongolia under Gwanggaeto the Great. Its capital, Seoul, is a major global city and half of South Korea's over 51 million people live in the Seoul Capital Area, the fourth largest metropolitan economy in the world.

Contents

History

1949–2002: Beginnings

Less than a year after the government of the Republic of Korea was established in 1948, the first official women's football matches were held in Seoul on 28 and 29 June 1949, as a part of the National Girls' and Women's Sport Games. While women's basketball and volleyball won public recognition through the Games, football was seen as being unsuitable for women and as being unattractive to the public; as a result, the girls' teams were disbanded soon after the event. [3]

Seoul Special city in Seoul Capital Area, South Korea

Seoul, officially the Seoul Special City, is the capital and largest metropolis of South Korea. With surrounding Incheon metropolis and Gyeonggi province, Seoul forms the heart of the Seoul Capital Area.

Womens basketball basketball played by women

Women's basketball was developed in the late 1800s in tandem with its men's counterpart. It became popular, spreading from the east coast of the United States to the west coast, in large part via women's colleges. From 1895 until 1970, the term "women's basketball" was also used to refer to netball, which evolved in parallel with modern women's basketball. It is mostly popular in America.

Volleyball ballgame and team sport in which two teams compete to ground the ball on their opponents side of the net

Volleyball is a popular team sport in which two teams of six players are separated by a net. Each team tries to score points by grounding a ball on the other team's court under organized rules. It has been a part of the official program of the Summer Olympic Games since Tokyo 1964.

When women's football was officially adopted at the 1990 Asian Games in Beijing, the South Korean sports authorities decided to form a women's team with athletes from other sports and send the team to the Games. [3] The result was defeat in all matches against Japan, North Korea, China and Chinese Taipei. [4] Nevertheless, colleges and corporations started to launch women's football teams through the 1990s and the first annual national women's football event, the Queen's Cup, was held in 1993. With these changes, South Korea was able to finish in fourth place at the 1995 AFC Women's Championship in Malaysia. [5]

1990 Asian Games 11th edition of the Asian Games

The 1990 Asian Games also known as the XI Asiad and the 11th Asian Games, were held from September 22 to October 7, 1990, in Beijing, China. This was the first Asian Games held in China.

Beijing Municipality in Peoples Republic of China

Beijing, formerly romanized as Peking, is the capital of the People's Republic of China, the world's third most populous city proper, and most populous capital city. The city, located in northern China, is governed as a municipality under the direct administration of the central government with 16 urban, suburban, and rural districts. Beijing Municipality is surrounded by Hebei Province with the exception of neighboring Tianjin Municipality to the southeast; together, the three divisions form the Jingjinji metropolitan region and the national capital region of China.

Japan womens national football team womens national association football team representing Japan

The Japan women's national football team, or Nadeshiko Japan (なでしこジャパン), represents Japan in women's association football and is run by the Japan Football Association (JFA). It is the most successful women's national team from the Asian Football Confederation. Its highest ranking in the FIFA Women's World Rankings is 3rd, achieved in December 2011.

When the 1999 Women's World Cup sparked interest worldwide, the South Korean ministry in charge of sports sponsored the foundation of new teams and tournaments for girls’ high school teams, university teams and company teams. To promote women’s football, the Korea Women's Football Federation (KWFF) was established in March 2001, as an independent organization in association with the Korea Football Association (KFA). [3]

Korea Football Association sports governing body

The Korea Football Association is the governing body of football in South Korea. Park Seung-bin was the very first President of the KFA, charged with the task of promoting and spreading organised football in the Korea. The budget for 2011 was ₩103,123,529,503.

2003–2013: First World Cup and a period of decline

South Korea finished in third place at the 2003 AFC Women's Championship and qualified for the World Cup for the first time. The Taegeuk Ladies were drawn in Group B with Norway, France and Brazil. Their first match played at the World Cup was a 3–0 loss to Brazil on 21 September 2003. They went on to lose 1–0 to France and 7–1 to Norway. Kim Jin-hee scored the first ever South Korean World Cup goal on 27 September 2003 against Norway.

The 2003 AFC Women's Championship was a women's football tournament held in Thailand from 8 to 21 June 2003. It was the 14th holding of the AFC Women's Championship, a tournament for women's national teams from countries affiliated to the Asian Football Confederation.

FIFA Womens World Cup Association football competition for womens national teams

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China. Under the tournament's current format, national teams vie for 23 slots in a three-year qualification phase. The host nation's team is automatically entered as the 24th slot. The tournament proper, alternatively called the World Cup Finals, is contested at venues within the host nation(s) over a period of about one month.

Group B of the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup was one of four groups of nations, consisting of Brazil, France, Norway and South Korea. It began on 20 September and ended on 27 September. Rising power Brazil topped the group, comfortably beating South Korea and Norway by large margins and were denied a 100% record by Marinette Pichon's last minute equalizer against France. Brazil were joined in the second round by Norway, who won their other two games against France and South Korea, both which were making their debut at the World Cup.

Despite winning the inaugural EAFF E-1 Football Championship on home soil in 2005, South Korea failed to qualify for the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup. The Taegeuk Ladies won bronze at the 2010 Asian Games and at the 2010 EAFF Women's Football Championship, but once again failed to qualify for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

EAFF E-1 Football Championship is an international football competition in East Asia for national teams of the East Asian Football Federation (EAFF). The competition between women's national teams is held alongside men's competition.

2007 FIFA Womens World Cup 2007 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup, the fifth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was an international association football competition for women held in China from 10 to 30 September 2007. Originally, China was to host the 2003 edition, but the outbreak of SARS in that country forced that event to be moved to the United States. FIFA immediately granted the 2007 event to China, which meant that no new host nation was chosen competitively until the voting was held for the 2011 Women's World Cup.

The Women's football tournament at the 2010 Asian Games was held in Guangzhou in China from 8 November to 25 November.

2014–present: Second World Cup

South Korea finished in fourth place at the 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup and qualified for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, where they made it out of the group stage for the first time. They were drawn in Group E with Brazil, Spain and Costa Rica. South Korea lost 2–0 to Brazil on 9 June 2015, but a 2–2 draw with Costa Rica on 13 June and a 2–1 victory against Spain on 17 June were enough to progress for the first time ever at a World Cup. They went on to lose 3–0 to France in the round of 16 on 21 June 2015.

2019 World Cup: Third World Cup

Coming off a somewhat successful showing at the previous one, South Korea qualified for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup and were put in Group A with France, Norway and Nigeria. However, they could not repeat their prior success in 2015 and lost all three games and exited the tournament in the group stage, only scoring one goal in their entire run and even an own goal.

Competition records

World Cup

World Cup record
Hosts / YearResultGPWD*LGSGAGD
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1991 Did not qualify
Flag of Sweden.svg 1995
Flag of the United States (Pantone).svg 1999
Flag of the United States (Pantone).svg 2003 Group stage3003111−10
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2007 Did not qualify
Flag of Germany.svg 2011
Flag of Canada (WFB 2000).png 2015 Round of 16411248−4
Flag of France.svg 2019 Group stage300318−7
Total3/810118627−21
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
FIFA Women's World Cup history
YearRoundDateOpponentResultStadium
Flag of the United States.svg 2003 Group stage21 SeptemberFlag of Brazil.svg  Brazil L 0–3 RFK Stadium, Washington, D.C.
24 SeptemberFlag of France.svg  France L 0–1
27 SeptemberFlag of Norway.svg  Norway L 1–7 Gillette Stadium, Foxborough
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 2015
Group stage9 JuneFlag of Brazil.svg  Brazil L 0–2 Olympic Stadium, Montreal
13 JuneFlag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica D 2–2
17 JuneFlag of Spain.svg  Spain W 2–1 Lansdowne Stadium, Ottawa
Round of 1621 JuneFlag of France.svg  France L 0–3 Olympic Stadium, Montreal
Flag of France.svg 2019 Group stage7 JuneFlag of France.svg  France L 0–4 Parc des Princes, Paris
12 JuneFlag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria L 0–2 Stade des Alpes, Grenoble
17 JuneFlag of Norway.svg  Norway L 1–2 Stade Auguste-Delaune, Reims

Asian Cup

AFC Women's Asian Cup record
Hosts / YearResultGPWD*LGSGAGD
Flag of Hong Kong 1959.svg 1975 Did not participate
Flag of the Republic of China.svg 1977
Flag of India.svg 1979
Flag of Hong Kong 1959.svg 1981
Flag of Thailand (TIS 982 draft standard).svg 1983
Flag of Hong Kong 1959.svg 1986
Flag of Hong Kong 1959.svg 1989
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg 1991 Group stage3003022−22
Flag of Malaysia.svg 1993 310249−5
Flag of Malaysia.svg 1995 Fourth place5212115+6
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1997 Group stage2101111+10
Flag of the Philippines.svg 1999 4301305+25
Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg 2001 Fourth place64021610+6
Flag of Thailand (TIS 982 draft standard).svg 2003 Third place6411225+17
Flag of Australia (converted).svg 2006 Group stage4202146+8
Flag of Vietnam.svg 2008 320153+2
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2010 311163+3
Flag of Vietnam.svg 2014 Fourth place5212184+14
Flag of Jordan.svg 2018 5th place422090+9
Total12/19482461814673+73

Olympics

Olympic Games record
Hosts / YearResultGPWD*LGSGAGD
Flag of the United States.svg 1996 Did not quality
Flag of Australia (converted).svg 2000
Flag of Greece.svg 2004
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2008
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg 2012
Flag of Brazil.svg 2016
Flag of Japan.svg 2020 To be determined
Total0/7

Asian Games

Asian Games record
Hosts / YearResultGPWDLGSGAGD
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1990 5th place5104230−28
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg 1994 Fourth place300309−9
Flag of Thailand (TIS 982 draft standard).svg 1998 Group stage311184+4
Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg 2002 Fourth place520368−2
Flag of Qatar.svg 2006 Fourth place5203710−3
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2010 Third place5311144+10
Flag of South Korea.svg 2014 Third place6501332+31
Flag of Indonesia.svg 2018 Third place6501323+29
Total8/8381921610271+31

EAFF Women's Football Championship

EAFF Women's Football Championship record
Hosts / YearResultGPWD*LGFGAGD
Flag of South Korea.svg 2005 Champions321030+3
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2008 Fourth place6303159+6
Flag of Japan.svg 2010 Third place7502474+43
Flag of South Korea.svg 2013 Third place310245–1
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2015 Runners-up6501293+26
Flag of Japan.svg 2017 Fourth place6303437+36
Flag of South Korea.svg 2019
Total6/6311911114128+113
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Peace Queen Cup

Hosts / YearResultGPWDLGFGAGD
Flag of South Korea.svg 2006 Group Stage300326−4
Flag of South Korea.svg 2008 Fourth place320154+1
Flag of South Korea.svg 2010 Champions312021+1
Total3/39324911–2

Kits

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Kit used in 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup match vs Brazil.

The women's team usually use exactly the same kit as its men counterpart, along with the combinations available. However, there were many combinations that the men's team never used.

Coaching staff

PositionName
Manager Flag of South Korea.svg Yoon Deok-Yeo
Assistant Manager Flag of South Korea.svg Jeong Seong-cheon
Coach Flag of South Korea.svg Kim Eun-jung
Goalkeeping Coach Flag of South Korea.svg Jeong Yuseok

Recent schedule and results

2019

Players

Current squad

Squad for the 2019 Four Nations Tournament and 2019 Cup of Nations. [6] [7]

Caps and goals correct as of: 11 January 2019.

Head coach: Yoon Deok-yeo

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
11 GK Kang Ga-ae (1990-12-10) 10 December 1990 (age 28)90 Flag of South Korea.svg Gumi Sportstoto
202 DF Kim Hye-ri (1990-06-25) 25 June 1990 (age 29)781 Flag of South Korea.svg Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
32 DF Hong Hye-ji (1996-08-25) 25 August 1996 (age 23)161 Flag of South Korea.svg Changnyeong
42 DF Jeong Yeong-a (1990-12-09) 9 December 1990 (age 28)120 Flag of South Korea.svg Gyeongju KHNP
52 DF Park Se-ra (1990-02-24) 24 February 1990 (age 29)00 Flag of South Korea.svg Gyeongju KHNP
62 DF Jang Sel-gi (1994-05-31) 31 May 1994 (age 25)4711 Flag of South Korea.svg Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
73 MF Kang Yu-mi (1991-10-05) 5 October 1991 (age 27)248 Flag of South Korea.svg Hwacheon KSPO
103 MF Ji So-yun (1991-02-21) 21 February 1991 (age 28)11954 Flag of England.svg Chelsea
93 MF Han Chae-rin (1996-09-02) 2 September 1996 (age 23)153 Flag of South Korea.svg Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
174 FW Lee Geum-min (1994-04-07) 7 April 1994 (age 25)4314 Flag of England.svg Manchester City
113 MF Lee Min-a (1991-11-08) 8 November 1991 (age 27)5114 Flag of Japan.svg INAC Kobe Leonessa
124 FW Jung Seol-bin (1990-01-06) 6 January 1990 (age 29)7220 Flag of South Korea.svg Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
273 MF Jeon Ga-eul (1988-09-14) 14 September 1988 (age 30)9638 Flag of South Korea.svg Hwacheon KSPO
83 MF Cho So-hyun (1988-06-24) 24 June 1988 (age 31)12420 Flag of England.svg West Ham United
163 MF Lee So-dam (1994-10-12) 12 October 1994 (age 24)454 Flag of South Korea.svg Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
224 FW Son Hwa-yeon (1997-03-15) 15 March 1997 (age 22)136 Flag of South Korea.svg Changnyeong
181 GK Kim Jung-mi (1984-10-16) 16 October 1984 (age 34)1130 Flag of South Korea.svg Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
193 MF Lee Young-ju (1992-04-22) 22 April 1992 (age 27)242 Flag of South Korea.svg Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
134 FW Yeo Min-ji (1993-04-27) 27 April 1993 (age 26)2810 Flag of South Korea.svg Gumi Sportstoto
211 GK Jung Bo-ram (1991-07-22) 22 July 1991 (age 28)30 Flag of South Korea.svg Hwacheon KSPO
22 DF Lee Eun-mi (1988-08-18) 18 August 1988 (age 31)8414 Flag of South Korea.svg Suwon UDC
233 MF Jang Chang (1996-06-21) 21 June 1996 (age 23)100 Flag of South Korea.svg Seoul
242 DF Shin Dam-yeong (1993-10-20) 20 October 1993 (age 25)311 Flag of South Korea.svg Suwon UDC
252 DF Ha Eun-hye (1995-11-27) 27 November 1995 (age 23)30 Flag of South Korea.svg Gumi Sportstoto
262 DF Lim Seon-joo (1990-11-27) 27 November 1990 (age 28)725 Flag of South Korea.svg Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels

Records

Most capped players

#NameSouth Korea careerCaps
1 Cho So-hyun 2007–present124
3 Kim Jung-mi 2003–present113
2 Ji So-yun 2006–present119
4 Kwon Hah-nul 2006–present103
5 Jeon Ga-eul 2007–present96
6 Yoo Young-a 2007–present87
7 Lee Eun-mi 2007–present84
8 Kim Do-yeon 2007–present80
9 Kim Hye-ri 2010–present78
10 Lee Myung-hwa 1990–200481
*Active players in bold, statistics as of 1 September 2018. [1]

Top goalscorers

#PlayerSouth Korea careerGoalsCaps
1 Ji So-yun 2006–present54119
2 Jeon Ga-eul 2007–present3895
3 Yoo Young-a 2007–present3287
4 Cha Sung-mi 1994–20033055
5 Park Hee-young 2005–20132355
6 Jung Seol-bin 2006–present2072
Cho So-hyun 2007–present124
8 Park Eun-sun 2003–present1734
9 Kwon Hah-nul 2006–present15103
10 Lee Geum-min 2013–present1443
Lee Eun-mi 2007–present84

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "각종기록" (in Korean). Korea Football Association (KFA). Retrieved 1 September 2018.
  2. "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 12 July 2019. Retrieved 12 July 2019.
  3. 1 2 3 Fan Hong; J.A. Mangan (23 November 2004). Soccer, Women, Sexual Liberation: Kicking off a New Era. Routledge. pp. 71–81. ISBN   978-1-135-77058-7.
  4. "Asian Games 1990 (Women's Tournament)". RSSSF. Retrieved 10 July 2018.
  5. Manzenreiter, Wolfram; Horne, John (14 August 2008). "Playing the Post‐Fordist Game in/to the Far East: The Footballisation of China, Japan and South Korea". Soccer & Society. 8 (4): 561–577. doi:10.1080/14660970701440899. ISSN   1466-0970.
  6. "여자대표팀, 중국과 호주에서 열리는 4개국 대회 참가" [Women's national team participated in four countries in China and Australia] (in Korean). Korea Football Association. 26 December 2018.
  7. "Korean stars named in Cup of Nations squad". Asian Football Confederation. 20 February 2019.
Preceded by
Inaugural Champion
EAFF Women's Football Championship
2005 (First title)
Succeeded by
2008 Japan  Flag of Japan.svg