South Texas

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San Antonio is the largest and fastest growing city in South Texas. Downtown-san-antonio.jpeg
San Antonio is the largest and fastest growing city in South Texas.
Corpus Christi is the second largest city in South Texas. CorpusChristiTX Night.jpg
Corpus Christi is the second largest city in South Texas.
Laredo is the third largest city in South Texas. The San Agustin Cathedral was built during the Spanish Texas period. San Agustin Cathedral.JPG
Laredo is the third largest city in South Texas. The San Agustin Cathedral was built during the Spanish Texas period.

South Texas is a region of the U.S. state of Texas that lies roughly south of—and including—San Antonio. The southern and western boundary is the Rio Grande, and to the east it is the Gulf of Mexico. The population of this region is about 4.96 million according to the 2017 census estimates. [1] The southern portion of this region is often referred to as the Rio Grande Valley. The eastern portion along the Gulf of Mexico is also referred to as the Coastal Bend.

In geography, regions are areas that are broadly divided by physical characteristics, human impact characteristics, and the interaction of humanity and the environment. Geographic regions and sub-regions are mostly described by their imprecisely defined, and sometimes transitory boundaries, except in human geography, where jurisdiction areas such as national borders are defined in law.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders.

Texas U.S. state in the United States

Texas is the second largest state in the United States by area and population. Located in the South Central region, Texas shares borders with the states of Louisiana to the east, Arkansas to the northeast, Oklahoma to the north, New Mexico to the west, and the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León, and Tamaulipas to the southwest, and has a coastline with the Gulf of Mexico to the southeast.

Contents

Land

There is no defined northern boundary, although it is believed to be at the city of San Antonio and from an east to west line extending from the Rio Grande near Maverick County to the Gulf of Mexico, but turning southeast at or near Lavaca County, and continuing towards the Gulf of Mexico to separate it from East Texas and Southeast Texas. The Rio Grande serves as the western and southern boundaries and separates Texas from Mexico. The eastern portion of South Texas is bordered by the Gulf of Mexico. This region of Texas consist of 41 counties. South Texas terrain is flat, lying on the coastal plain. South Texas is so vast, there are even subregions. The very southern tip of South Texas, called the Rio Grande Valley, has fertile soils and is known for its citrus production. The eastern portion of South Texas is often referred to as the Coastal Bend; here, coastal salt marshes, estuaries, and wetlands are scattered. The western and central parts are known as the South Texas Plains or the brush country. Mesquite trees and crop fields dominate the land.

Rio Grande River forming part of the US-Mexico border

The Rio Grande is one of the principal rivers in the southwest United States and northern Mexico. The Rio Grande begins in south-central Colorado in the United States and flows to the Gulf of Mexico. After passing through the length of New Mexico along the way, it forms part of the Mexico–United States border. According to the International Boundary and Water Commission, its total length was 1,896 miles (3,051 km) in the late 1980s, though course shifts occasionally result in length changes. Depending on how it is measured, the Rio Grande is either the fourth- or fifth-longest river system in North America.

Maverick County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Maverick County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 54,258. Its county seat is Eagle Pass. The county was created in 1856 and organized in 1871. It is named for Samuel Maverick, cattleman and state legislator.

Gulf of Mexico An Atlantic Ocean basin extending into southern North America

The Gulf of Mexico is an ocean basin and a marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean, largely surrounded by the North American continent. It is bounded on the northeast, north and northwest by the Gulf Coast of the United States, on the southwest and south by Mexico, and on the southeast by Cuba. The U.S. states of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida border the Gulf on the north, which are often referred to as the "Third Coast", in comparison with the U.S. Atlantic and Pacific coasts.

Counties

South Texas is depicted in red. Counties sometimes considered part of South Texas are in a lighter shade of red. Regions of Texas.PNG
South Texas is depicted in red. Counties sometimes considered part of South Texas are in a lighter shade of red.
Aransas County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Aransas County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 23,158. Its county seat is Rockport. The county was formed in 1871 from Refugio County and organized the following year. It was named for the Rio Nuestra Senora de Aranzazu, a Spanish outpost in early Texas.

Atascosa County, Texas County in Texas

Atascosa County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 44,911. Its county seat is Jourdanton. The county was formed in 1856 from Bexar County and is named for the Atascosa River.

Bee County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Bee County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 31,861. Its county seat is Beeville. The county was founded December 8, 1857 and organized the next year. It is named for Barnard E. Bee, Sr., a secretary of state of the Republic of Texas.

Goliad County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Goliad County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population is 7,210. Its county seat is Goliad. The county is named for Father Miguel Hidalgo; "Goliad" is an anagram, minus the silent H. The county was created in 1836 and organized the next year.

Gonzales County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Gonzales County is a county in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 19,807. The county is named for its county seat, the city of Gonzales. The county was created in 1836 and organized the following year.

Guadalupe County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Guadalupe County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 131,533. The county seat is Seguin. The county was founded in 1846 and is named after Guadalupe River.

La Salle County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

La Salle County is a county in Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 6,886. Its county seat is Cotulla. The county was created in 1858 and later organized in 1880. It is named for René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, a 17th-century French explorer.

Lavaca County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Lavaca County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 19,263. Its county seat is Hallettsville. The county was created in 1846. It is named for the Lavaca River which curves its way South East through Moulton and Hallettsville before reaching the coast at Matagorda Bay.

Live Oak County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Live Oak County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 11,531. Its county seat is George West. The county was named for the groves of live oak within its borders.

Uvalde County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Uvalde County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 26,405. Its county seat is Uvalde. The county was created in 1850 and organized in 1856. It is named for Juan de Ugalde, the Spanish governor of Coahuila. Uvalde County was founded by Reading Wood Black who also founded the city of Uvalde, Texas.

Victoria County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Victoria County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 86,793. Its county seat is Victoria.

Webb County, Texas U.S. county in Texas

Webb County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 250,304. Its county seat is Laredo. The county was named after James Webb, who served as Secretary of the Treasury, Secretary of State, and Attorney General of the Republic of Texas, and later judge of the United States District Court following the admission of Texas to statehood. By area, Webb County is the largest county in South Texas and the sixth-largest in the state. Webb County includes the Laredo metropolitan area.

Cities

Brownsville is the fourth largest city in South Texas. Brnelizand10thst.jpg
Brownsville is the fourth largest city in South Texas.
Region Rank City 2017 Estimates [2] 2010 Census % change County
1 San Antonio 1,511,9461,327,407+13.90% Bexar County
2 Corpus Christi 325,605305,215+6.68% Nueces County
3 Laredo 260,654236,091+10.40% Webb County
4 Brownsville 183,299175,023+4.73% Cameron County
5 McAllen 142,696129,877+9.87% Hidalgo County
6 Edinburg 90,28077,100+17.09% Hidalgo County
7 Mission 84,42477,058+9.56% Hidalgo County
8 Pharr 79,48770,400+12.91% Hidalgo County
9 Victoria 67,10662,592+7.21% Victoria County
10 Harlingen 65,46764,849+0.95% Cameron County
11 Weslaco 40,35835,670+13.14% Hidalgo County
12 Schertz 40,09231,465+27.42% Bexar County
13 San Juan 36,98133,856+9.23% Hidalgo County
14 Seguin 28,98325,175+15.13% Guadalupe County
15 Eagle Pass 28,94526,248+10.28% Maverick County
16 Kingsville 25,48226,213-2.79% Kleberg County
17 San Benito 24,52824,250+1.15% Cameron County
18 Converse 23,37518,198+28.45% Bexar County
19 Universal City 20,53218,530+10.80% Bexar County
20 Alamo 19,67918,353+7.23% Hidalgo County
McAllen is the fifth largest city in South Texas. Mcallen.jpg
McAllen is the fifth largest city in South Texas.

Some people consider Houston to be in South Texas for several reasons: Numerous businesses in the Houston region contain 'South Texas' in their titles. [3] The United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas includes the Houston division. However, Houston is most accurately classified as being within Southeast Texas, a subregion of East Texas.

Rivers

NameNote
Rio Grande The border between Texas and Mexico
Nueces River At one time considered by Mexico as the border between Texas and Mexico
San Antonio River Part of the river is the location of San Antonio's Famous River Walk.
Aransas River A short river that drains in Copano Bay.
Frio River A fairly cold river, hence the name Frio, which means "cold" in Spanish.
Atascosa River A short river that empties into the Frio River
Mission River Flows into Mission Bay
Leona River A tributary of the Frio River, within the Nueces River Basin
Guadalupe River Flows into the San Antonio Bay estuary at Guadalupe Bay

Lakes and reservoirs

Bays

Padre Island is a popular beach destination. Padre Island National Seashore - sand dunes3.jpg
Padre Island is a popular beach destination.

Estuaries and waterways

Islands

Climate

The climate of South Texas is varied. The area along the Mexican border is generally semi-arid (Köppen climate classification BSh), while the area from the coast inland to just west of San Antonio has a humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa). South Texas weather is affected by the Sierra Madre Oriental mountains to the west, the Gulf of Mexico to the east, and the Chihuahuan Desert to the west/northwest. Moisture from the Pacific is cut off by the Mexican Sierra Madre Occidental and Oriental mountain ranges. Along coastal south Texas, the climate is a transition zone from humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) to tropical savanna climate (Köppen Aw). Along the coast the climate is best exemplified in the summers when humidity is extremely high though at times arid, depending upon whether tropical moisture from the Gulf and sometimes from the Pacific is flowing in or if the region is cut off from any moisture by high pressure systems, causing long droughts, which occur every few years. Temperatures reach freezing only a few times in the winter and snowfall is rare, usually three inches or less. Summers in this zone are hot and humid, with daily averages above 90 °F or 32.2 °C. In addition, areas in Texas that are slightly inland from the Gulf of Mexico, such as San Antonio that border the semi-arid climate zone, generally see a peak of precipitation in the spring, and a deep, drought-like nadir in midsummer. The region itself sees a short wet season from March to May and another one from late August to October, and a dry season elsewhere in the year. Night-time temperatures are around 85 °F or 29.4 °C in summer. The region of South Texas includes the semi-arid ranch country and the wetter Rio Grande Valley. Considered to be the southernmost tip of the American Great Plains region, the inland region has rainfall similar to that of the Northern Plains. The coastal areas are warm most of the year due to currents of the Gulf of Mexico, but can get cold in winter if a strong front comes in, occasionally causing snow at sea level. Rain in the coastal region is more abundant than in the inland region, and subtropical forests line the Rio Grande. Inland, where it is drier, ranches dominate the landscape, characterized by thick, spiny brush and grasslands. The winters in the inland region are cooler and drier, as Arctic air can make it into the region, but snow is rare due to the lack of humidity. Summers are for the most part hot and dry, but at times can be humid if winds come off the warmer Gulf of Mexico. Tornadoes can occur in this region, but less frequently than in other parts of the state.

Climate data for Corpus Christi, Texas (Corpus Christi Int'l), 1981–2010 normals
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)91
(33)
97
(36)
102
(39)
102
(39)
103
(39)
107
(42)
105
(41)
107
(42)
109
(43)
101
(38)
98
(37)
91
(33)
109
(43)
Average high °F (°C)66.9
(19.4)
70.4
(21.3)
75.9
(24.4)
81.7
(27.6)
86.6
(30.3)
90.9
(32.7)
93.1
(33.9)
94.4
(34.7)
90.1
(32.3)
84.4
(29.1)
76.0
(24.4)
68.4
(20.2)
81.6
(27.6)
Daily mean °F (°C)57.1
(13.9)
60.5
(15.8)
66.1
(18.9)
72.4
(22.4)
78.3
(25.7)
82.4
(28.0)
83.9
(28.8)
84.7
(29.3)
81.1
(27.3)
74.5
(23.6)
66.1
(18.9)
58.5
(14.7)
72.1
(22.3)
Average low °F (°C)47.2
(8.4)
50.5
(10.3)
56.3
(13.5)
63.0
(17.2)
70.0
(21.1)
73.9
(23.3)
74.8
(23.8)
75.0
(23.9)
72.0
(22.2)
64.8
(18.2)
56.2
(13.4)
48.6
(9.2)
62.7
(17.1)
Record low °F (°C)14
(−10)
11
(−12)
24
(−4)
33
(1)
45
(7)
56
(13)
64
(18)
64
(18)
52
(11)
28
(−2)
27
(−3)
13
(−11)
11
(−12)
Average precipitation inches (mm)1.54
(39)
1.92
(49)
1.89
(48)
1.84
(47)
3.07
(78)
3.36
(85)
2.79
(71)
2.92
(74)
4.97
(126)
3.64
(92)
1.97
(50)
1.82
(46)
31.73
(805)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in)7.16.55.35.36.06.85.76.58.86.36.06.476.6
Average relative humidity (%)60.578.076.076.077.580.078.575.074.575.573.574.078.0
[ citation needed ]
Climate data for Laredo, TX
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)95
(35)
103
(39)
105
(41)
110
(43)
114
(46)
114
(46)
113
(45)
111
(44)
110
(43)
104
(40)
99
(37)
95
(35)
114
(46)
Average high °F (°C)67.9
(19.9)
72.8
(22.7)
80.7
(27.1)
88.4
(31.3)
94.4
(34.7)
98.9
(37.2)
100.1
(37.8)
100.7
(38.2)
94.3
(34.6)
87.0
(30.6)
77.2
(25.1)
68.6
(20.3)
85.9
(29.9)
Average low °F (°C)45.4
(7.4)
49.7
(9.8)
56.3
(13.5)
63.6
(17.6)
70.8
(21.6)
75.2
(24.0)
76.0
(24.4)
76.3
(24.6)
72.0
(22.2)
64.6
(18.1)
54.5
(12.5)
46.1
(7.8)
62.5
(16.9)
Record low °F (°C)19
(−7)
20
(−7)
27
(−3)
32
(0)
45
(7)
58
(14)
66
(19)
61
(16)
49
(9)
28
(−2)
27
(−3)
11
(−12)
11
(−12)
Average rainfall inches (mm)0.88
(22)
0.94
(24)
1.11
(28)
1.45
(37)
2.48
(63)
2.23
(57)
2.20
(56)
1.93
(49)
2.93
(74)
2.21
(56)
1.10
(28)
0.88
(22)
20.34
(516)
Average rainy days (≥ 0.01 in)6.05.34.44.25.35.14.85.16.74.44.35.661.2
Source: Weather Channel (extremes) [8]
Climate data for Brownsville, Texas
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)91
(33)
94
(34)
106
(41)
102
(39)
102
(39)
103
(39)
103
(39)
104
(40)
105
(41)
99
(37)
98
(37)
94
(34)
106
(41)
Average high °F (°C)70.7
(21.5)
73.9
(23.3)
79.0
(26.1)
83.9
(28.8)
88.6
(31.4)
92.3
(33.5)
93.7
(34.3)
94.5
(34.7)
90.6
(32.6)
85.7
(29.8)
79.2
(26.2)
72.0
(22.2)
83.7
(28.7)
Daily mean °F (°C)61.2
(16.2)
64.3
(17.9)
69.3
(20.7)
74.9
(23.8)
80.5
(26.9)
84.0
(28.9)
85.0
(29.4)
85.4
(29.7)
81.9
(27.7)
76.3
(24.6)
69.4
(20.8)
62.4
(16.9)
74.6
(23.7)
Average low °F (°C)51.6
(10.9)
54.7
(12.6)
59.6
(15.3)
65.9
(18.8)
72.3
(22.4)
75.7
(24.3)
76.3
(24.6)
76.2
(24.6)
73.1
(22.8)
66.9
(19.4)
59.6
(15.3)
52.7
(11.5)
65.4
(18.6)
Record low °F (°C)18
(−8)
12
(−11)
28
(−2)
37
(3)
41
(5)
56
(13)
57
(14)
63
(17)
51
(11)
35
(2)
27
(−3)
16
(−9)
12
(−11)
Average rainfall inches (mm)1.27
(32)
1.12
(28)
1.23
(31)
1.54
(39)
2.64
(67)
2.57
(65)
2.04
(52)
2.44
(62)
5.92
(150)
3.74
(95)
1.82
(46)
1.15
(29)
27.48
(696)
Average rainy days (≥ 0.01 in)7.75.44.24.05.06.65.07.29.37.35.97.274.8
Mean monthly sunshine hours 130.2152.6207.7234.0266.6306.0334.8306.9252.0229.4165.0130.22,715.4
Source #1: National Weather Service (normals 1981−2010) [9]
Source #2: Hong Kong Observatory (sun, 1961−1990) [10]
Climate data for Victoria, Texas
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)88
(31)
96
(36)
99
(37)
100
(38)
102
(39)
107
(42)
110
(43)
109
(43)
111
(44)
109
(43)
93
(34)
88
(31)
111
(44)
Average high °F (°C)62.8
(17.1)
66.6
(19.2)
73.4
(23.0)
79.2
(26.2)
85.1
(29.5)
90.3
(32.4)
93.4
(34.1)
93.7
(34.3)
89.9
(32.2)
83.0
(28.3)
73.0
(22.8)
65.2
(18.4)
79.6
(26.5)
Average low °F (°C)43.6
(6.4)
46.7
(8.2)
53.9
(12.2)
60.1
(15.6)
68.1
(20.1)
73.3
(22.9)
75.0
(23.9)
74.6
(23.7)
70.3
(21.3)
61.6
(16.4)
52.3
(11.3)
45.2
(7.3)
60.4
(15.8)
Record low °F (°C)9
(−13)
15
(−9)
21
(−6)
33
(1)
40
(4)
54
(12)
61
(16)
61
(16)
45
(7)
31
(−1)
18
(−8)
9
(−13)
9
(−13)
Average precipitation inches (mm)2.44
(62)
2.04
(52)
2.25
(57)
2.97
(75)
5.12
(130)
4.96
(126)
2.90
(74)
3.05
(77)
5.00
(127)
4.26
(108)
2.64
(67)
2.47
(63)
40.1
(1,018)
Source: National Weather Service [11]

Hurricanes are the most dangerous weather systems to affect South Texas. Hurricane season is between June and November. However, the Texas coast gets affected usually between August and September, when systems sporadically organize in the southern Gulf around the Bay of Campeche or western Caribbean and the latter months forming off the coast of Africa.

Droughts- Although South Texas summers generally see rainfall in summer months, some years the lack of rain is persistent and leads to water shortages; lake levels drop significantly and lead to municipal water restrictions. In the summer of 2011, numerous records were set. On August 28, 2011, most of South Texas had temperatures reaching 110 °F, breaking many cities' record highs. Furthermore, 95% of the state faced an extreme or exceptional drought, according to the office of the Texas state climatologist. These drought conditions led to a string of dangerous wildfires across the state, and the enforcement of burn bans in 250 of the 254 counties in Texas.

Tornadoes do occur in this part of the state, but not as frequently as other parts. They approach, usually from the northwest to southeast, as a line of severe thunderstorms, mostly in the summer months and by cold fronts in fall.

Snow rarely falls south of San Antonio or on the coast except in rare circumstances. Of note is the 2004 Christmas Eve snowstorm, when 6 inches (150 mm) of snow fell as far south as McAllen.

Wildlife

(incomplete list)

Reptiles

Mammals

Sealife

Arthropods

Birds

People

Multicultural influences

South Texas is well known for strong Hispanic, primarily Mexican American and Tejano (the Spanish term for "Texan") influences, due to its proximity to Mexico. Tejanos and Mexicans living in South Texas are descended from the Spanish and Sephardic Jewish settlers of Mexico, from Mexican indigenous groups allied with the Spanish, such as Tlaxcaltec and Otomi peoples, and from local indigenous groups of South Texas who were missionized by the Spanish, particularly Coahuiltecans. These migrations occurred and have been ongoing since the early 1700s in South Texas. The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in the 1840s failed to secure land belonging to the Mexican settlers. The disputed area was between the Nueces River south of San Antonio and Corpus Christi, the King Ranch, and the Rio Grande. Recognized by neither Mexico nor the United States, the Republic of the Rio Grande was established in this region in 1840, lasting less than a year. Laredo served as its capital.

The Rio Grande Valley area played a significant role in the Mexican War of Independence, the Texas Revolution, the Mexican–American War, and the American Civil War, with many historical battle sites around the area. General Robert E. Lee resided at Fort Ringold (Rio Grande City) during this time as a colonel. President Zachary Taylor was General of the Army at Fort Brown (Brownsville) during the Mexican–American War.

The Texas Rangers gained popularity for their actions in South Texas during the Mexican bandit raids in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. On May 25, 1876, a band of 40 Texas Rangers rode out of Laredo and headed north to the infamous Nueces Strip. Their mission was to find, kill or capture John King Fisher, leader of a band of cattle rustlers and cut-throats who had been terrorizing the area. The Rangers were members of a select group known as the Special Force. Led by the legendary Leander McNelly, the Special Force was given the task to bring law and order to an area of South Texas that lay between Corpus Christi and the Mexican border. [13]

Industry

Rice

Hauling rice in South Texas (postcard, circa 1909) Hauling rice in South Texas.jpg
Hauling rice in South Texas (postcard, circa 1909)

An important event in the development of South Texas and the Texas Gulf Coast rice industry was the introduction of seed imported from Japan in 1904. The Houston Chamber of Commerce and the Southern Pacific Railroad invited Japanese farmers to Texas to help area farms in the production of rice. The seed the Japanese farmers brought with them was a gift from the Japanese emperor. The production of Japanese rice began at Webster in Harris County. The Gulf Coast rice industry is credited to the Saibara family. [14]

Transportation

Air

Passenger Rail

Major highways

Interstate

US Routes

Texas State Highways

International Bridges

Laredo

Eagle Pass

Brownsville

Los Indios

Falcon Heights

Hidalgo
McAllen

Pharr

Progreso

Rio Grande City

Roma

Tourism

San Antonio

Corpus Christi

Laredo

Rio Grande Valley

Other

Education

Colleges

Public universities

Private universities

Sports

The only major professional sports team in South Texas is the San Antonio Spurs in the NBA.

TeamSportLeagueVenue
San Antonio Spurs Basketball NBA AT&T Center
San Antonio Silver Stars WNBA
Rio Grande Valley Vipers NBA D-League State Farm Arena
San Antonio Talons Arena Football AFL Alamodome
Corpus Christi Hammerheads Lone Star Football League American Bank Center
Corpus Christi Hooks Baseball Texas League Whataburger Field
San Antonio Missions Nelson W. Wolff Municipal Stadium
Laredo Lemurs AAIPB Laredo Ballpark
Brownsville Charros United League Baseball Harlingen Field
Rio Grande Valley WhiteWings Harlingen Field
San Antonio Rampage Ice hockey American Hockey League AT&T Center
Corpus Christi IceRays North American Hockey League American Bank Center
San Antonio Scorpions FC Soccer NASL Toyota Field
Laredo Heat PDL TAMIU Soccer Complex
La Fiera FC Indoor Soccer PASL State Farm Arena

Area codes

See also

Related Research Articles

Interstate 37 Interstate in South Texas

Interstate 37 (I-37) is a 143.0-mile (230.1 km) Interstate Highway located within the southern portion of the U.S. state of Texas. The highway was first designated in 1959 as a route between Corpus Christi and San Antonio. Construction in the urban areas of Corpus Christi and San Antonio began in the 1960s and the segments of the Interstate Highway in rural areas were completed by the 1980s. Prior to I-37, the route between Corpus Christi and San Antonio was served by a combination of State Highway 9 from Corpus Christi to Three Rivers and U.S. Route 281 (US 281) from Three Rivers to San Antonio. As a result of the construction of I-37, SH 9 was removed from the State Highway System.

Corpus Christi, Texas City in Texas, United States

Corpus Christi, colloquially Corpus, is a coastal city in the South Texas region of the U.S. state of Texas. The county seat of Nueces County, it also extends into Aransas, Kleberg, and San Patricio Counties. It is 130 miles southeast of San Antonio. Its political boundaries encompass Nueces Bay and Corpus Christi Bay. Its zoned boundaries include small land parcels or water inlets of three neighboring counties.

Nueces River river in the United States of America

The Nueces River is a river in the U.S. state of Texas, about 315 miles (507 km) long. It drains a region in central and southern Texas southeastward into the Gulf of Mexico. It is the southernmost major river in Texas other than the boundary-setting Rio Grande. Nueces is Spanish for nuts; early settlers named the river after the numerous pecan trees along its banks.

Aransas Pass

Aransas Pass is a navigable salt water channel connecting the Gulf of Mexico with Aransas Bay on the Texas Gulf coast in the United States. The pass separates Mustang Island to the south from San José Island to the north, and is protected by jetties extending into the Gulf from both islands. At the eastern end of the pass is the town of Port Aransas, located at the far northern end of Mustang Island. At the western end of the pass, on the mainland side of Aransas Bay, is the town of Aransas Pass. A free ferry serves the two towns. The pass is located on the Aransas County and Nueces County line.

Richard King was a riverboat captain, confederate, entrepreneur, and most notably, the founder of the King Ranch in South Texas, which at the time of his death in 1885 encompassed over 825,000 acres (3,340 km2).

Brownsville/South Padre Island International Airport airport in Brownsville, Texas, United States

Brownsville/South Padre Island International Airport is five miles (7 km) east of downtown Brownsville, Cameron County, Texas.

Texas Mexican Railway

The Texas Mexican Railway is a railroad that operates as a subsidiary of the Kansas City Southern Railway in Texas. It is often referred to as the Tex-Mex, or TexMex Railway.

Hurricane Bret 1999 Category 4 Atlantic hurricane

Hurricane Bret was the first of five Category 4 hurricanes that developed during the 1999 Atlantic hurricane season and the first tropical cyclone since Hurricane Jerry in 1989 to make landfall in Texas at hurricane intensity. Forming from a tropical wave on August 18, Bret slowly organized within weak steering currents in the Bay of Campeche. By August 20, the storm began to track northward and underwent rapid intensification on August 21. After this period of strengthening, Bret attained its peak intensity with winds of 145 miles per hour (233 km/h) and a barometric pressure of 944 mbar (hPa; 27.9 inHg). Later that day, the storm weakened to a Category 3 hurricane and made landfall on Padre Island, Texas. Shortly thereafter, the storm weakened further, becoming a tropical depression 24 hours after moving inland. The remnants of the storm eventually dissipated early on August 26 over northern Mexico.

Mustang Island island in the United States of America

Mustang Island is a barrier island on the Gulf Coast of Texas in the United States. The island is 18 miles (29 km) long, stretching from Corpus Christi to Port Aransas. The island is oriented generally northeast-southwest, with the Gulf of Mexico on the east and south, and Corpus Christi Bay on the north and west. The island's southern end connects by roadway to Padre Island. At the northern end of the island is Port Aransas, beyond which is San José Island. The Aransas Channel, also known as the "Aransas Pass," which separates Mustang Island from San José Island, is protected by jetties extending into the Gulf from each island.

The Texas Coastal Bend, or just the Coastal Bend, is a geographical region in the US state of Texas. The name refers to the area being a curve along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. The largest city of the Coastal Bend is Corpus Christi. It includes part of Laguna Madre and North Padre Island, as well as Mustang Island.

Corpus Christi Bay

Corpus Christi Bay is a scenic semi-tropical bay on the Texas coast found in San Patricio and Nueces counties, next to the major city of Corpus Christi. It is separated from the Gulf of Mexico by Mustang Island, and is fed by the Nueces River and Oso Creek from its western and southern extensions, Nueces Bay and Oso Bay. The bay is located approximately 136 miles (219 km) south of San Antonio, and 179 miles (288 km) southwest of Houston.

Texas State Highway 361 highway in Texas

State Highway 361 or SH 361 is a state highway in San Patricio and Nueces counties that runs from Gregory in southern Texas, near Corpus Christi, east and south to Padre Island on the Gulf of Mexico coast.

State Highway 358 or SH 358 is a Texas state highway that runs along the southern edge of Corpus Christi. The access road for Highway 358 is known as SPID. The official division is FM 665.

Corpus Christi Harbor Bridge bridge in United States of America

The Corpus Christi Harbor Bridge is a through arch bridge located in Corpus Christi, Texas which carries six lanes of US 181 from downtown Corpus Christi to Rincon Point, known to locals as North Beach. The harbor bridge crosses the Corpus Christi Ship Channel and handles nearly 26,000 vehicles daily. A new bridge called the New Harbor Bridge is currently under construction. When complete it will allow larger ships to pass beneath, permit safer pedestrian transit, and reconfigure the entire highway interchange system in the surrounding community.

Houston Air Route Traffic Control Center

Houston Air Route Traffic Control Center (ZHU) is located at George Bush Intercontinental Airport at 16600 JFK Boulevard, Houston, Texas, United States 77032. The Houston ARTCC is one of 22 Air Route Traffic Control Centers in the United States. Houston Center is the 9th busiest ARTCC in the United States. Between January 1, 2017 and December 31, 2017, Houston Center handled 2,266,553 aircraft operations.

History of Corpus Christi, Texas aspect of history

Corpus Christi is a coastal city in the South Texas region of the U.S. state of Texas. The county seat of Nueces County, it also extends into Aransas, Kleberg, and San Patricio counties. The population was 277,454 at the 2000 census; in 2006 the U.S. Census Bureau estimated the city's population at 285,175, making it the eighth-largest city in the state. It is the principal city of the three-county Corpus Christi Metropolitan Statistical Area as well as the larger Corpus Christi-Kingsville Combined Statistical Area. The translation from Latin of the city's name is Body of Christ, given to the settlement by the Spanish, in honor of the Blessed Sacrament (Eucharist). The city has been nicknamed The Sparkling City by the Sea, or "Corpitos" particularly in literature promoting tourism.

Great Texas Coastal Birding Trail

The Great Texas Coastal Birding Trail is a state-designated system of trails, bird sanctuaries, and nature preserves along the entire length of the Texas Gulf Coast in the United States. As the state of Texas hosts more bird species than any other state in the U.S. the trail system offers some of the most unusual opportunities for bird-watching in the world. The "trail" is actually 43 separate hiking and driving trails that include 308 birding sites. The sites themselves feature a variety of viewing opportunities with boardwalks, observation decks, and other amenities. The trails boast more than 450 bird species. The trail system is managed by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department as part of the Great Texas Wildlife Trails which also include the Heart of Texas Wildlife Trail, the Panhandle Plains Wildlife Trail, and the Prairies and Pineywoods Wildlife Trail.

St. Louis, Brownsville and Mexico Railway defunct American railway in Texas

Chartered on June 6, 1903, the St. Louis, Brownsville & Mexico Railway was a 200-mile (321 km) U.S. railroad that operated from Brownsville, Texas, to Gulf Coast Junction in Houston, Texas. It served numerous towns and cities along its routes and operated a rail bridge between Brownsville and Matamoros, Tamaulipas, in junction with the Mexican government. The Brownie connected the citizens of Brownsville to nearby Corpus Christi for the first time on land rather than using water transportation.

The San Antonio and Aransas Pass Railway first began operation in the U.S. state of Texas in 1886. It was developed by Uriah Lott and businessmen of San Antonio as a direct route from the city to Aransas Bay on the Texas Gulf coast. It was eventually absorbed in the 20th century by Southern Pacific.

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Corpus Christi, Texas, USA.

References

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  2. Official records for San Antonio were kept at downtown from March 1885 to December 1940, at Stinson Municipal Airport from January 1941 to June 1942, and at San Antonio Int'l since July 1942. For more information, see Threadex
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  13. Aransas County Airport Website Aransas Co Airport Call Sign: RKP(U.S), KRKP(International)