South Tipperary

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South Tipperary
Tiobraid Árann Theas
Tipperary (South Riding)
Former County
1898–2014
South-tipperary-county-council-logo.jpeg
Motto(s): 
Vallis Aurea Siurensis  (Latin)
"The Golden Vale of the Suir"
South Tipperary in Ireland.svg
Country Ireland
Province Munster
Created 12 August 1898
Abolished 3 June 2014
County town Clonmel
Government
  Type South Tipperary County Council
Area
  Total2,257 km2 (871 sq mi)
Population
 (2011)
88,433
Car plates TS (1987–2013)

South Tipperary (Irish : Tiobraid Árann Theas) was a county in Ireland. It was part of the South-East Region and was also located in the province of Munster. It was named after the town of Tipperary and consisted of 52% of the land area of the traditional county of Tipperary. South Tipperary County Council was the local authority for the county. The population of the county was 88,433 according to the 2011 census. It was abolished on 3 June 2014, merged with North Tipperary under a new Tipperary County Council. [1] [2]

Contents

Geography and political subdivisions

The Galtee Mountains seen from the Glen of Aherlow. Galtee range aherlow.JPG
The Galtee Mountains seen from the Glen of Aherlow.

The county was part of the central plain of Ireland, but the diversified terrain contained several mountain ranges, notably the Knockmealdowns and the Galtees. The county was landlocked and drained by the River Suir. The centre of the county included much of the Golden Vale, a rich pastoral stretch of land in the Suir basin which extends into counties Limerick and Cork.

The county was established in 1898 with separate assize courts since 1838. The county town was Clonmel; other important urban centres included Carrick-on-Suir, Cashel, Cahir and Tipperary. The county's motto was Vallis Aurea Siurensis (Latin : The Golden Vale of the Suir ).

Baronies

There were six historic baronies in South Tipperary: Clanwilliam, Iffa and Offa East, Iffa and Offa West, Kilnamanagh Lower, Middle Third and Slievardagh.

Civil parishes and townlands

Civil parishes in Ireland were delineated after the Down Survey as an intermediate subdivision, with multiple townlands per parish and multiple parishes per barony. The civil parishes had some use in local taxation and were included on the nineteenth century maps of the Ordnance Survey of Ireland. [3] For poor law purposes, District Electoral Divisions replaced civil parishes in the mid-nineteenth century. There were 123 civil parishes in the county. [4]

Local government and politics

The administrative county of Tipperary (South Riding) was established in 1898. The area also had a separate existence as a judicial county following the establishment of assize courts in 1838. The county's name changed to South Tipperary, and the council's name to South Tipperary County Council under the Local Government Act 2001. The Council oversaw the county as an independent local government area. The Council was made up of 21 representatives, directly elected through the system of proportional representation by means of a single transferable vote.

Ardfinnan Castle, Ardfinnan. Castles of Munster, Ardfinnan, Tipperary - geograph.org.uk - 1393364.jpg
Ardfinnan Castle, Ardfinnan.

Under the provisions of the Local Government Act 1991, (Regional Authorities) (Establishment) Order, 1993, [5] the territory of South Tipperary was defined as being in the South-East Region. This region was a NUTS III region of the European Union. The county of North Tipperary, by contrast, was part of the Mid-West Region. At a NUTS II level, both counties were in the Southern and Eastern region.

Irish language

There were native speakers of Irish in South Tipperary until the middle of the 20th century. Recordings of their dialect, made before the last native speakers died, have been made available through a project of the Royal Irish Academy Library. [6]

Related Research Articles

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County Tipperary County in Ireland

County Tipperary is a county in Ireland. It is located in the province of Munster. The county is named after the town of Tipperary, and was established in the early 13th century, shortly after the Norman invasion of Ireland. The population of the county was 159,553 at the 2016 census. The largest towns are Clonmel, Nenagh and Thurles.

North Tipperary Former Irish county

North Tipperary was a county in Ireland. It was part of the Mid-West Region and was also located in the province of Munster. It was named after the town of Tipperary and consisted of 48% of the land area of the traditional county of Tipperary. North Tipperary County Council was the local authority for the county. In 2011, the population of the county was 70,322. It was abolished on 3 June 2014, merged with South Tipperary under a new Tipperary County Council.

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Ardfinnan Village in Munster, Ireland

Ardfinnan is a small village in County Tipperary in Ireland. It is situated on the River Suir and R665 regional road. The Catholic parish of Ardfinnan is made up of three areas: Ardfinnan, Ballybacon, and Grange. Ardfinnan is also a civil parish in the ancient barony of Iffa and Offa West. The village is located 14 kilometers from the town of Clonmel and six miles from Cahir via the R670 road. The population of the village is approximately 900 people.

East Tipperary was a UK Parliament constituency in Ireland, returning one Member of Parliament 1885–1922. Prior to the 1885 United Kingdom general election the area was part of the Tipperary. From 1922 it was not represented in the UK Parliament.

Ormond Lower is a barony in County Tipperary, Ireland. This geographical unit of land is one of 12 baronies in County Tipperary. Its chief town is Nenagh. The barony lies between Ormond Upper to the south-east and Owney and Arra to the south-west. As a "peninsula", it is surrounded on three sides by counties Galway and Offaly.

Ormond Upper is a barony in County Tipperary, Ireland. This geographical unit of land is one of 12 baronies in County Tipperary. Its chief town is Toomevara. The barony lies between Ormond Lower to the north, Kilnamanagh Upper to the south, Owney and Arra to the west and Ikerrin to the east. The territory is currently administered by Tipperary County Council. The O'Mearas had an extensive territory in the barony; the name of their chief residence, Tuaim-ui-Meara, is still retained in the town of Toomavara.

Owney and Arra is a barony in County Tipperary, Ireland. This geographical unit of land is one of 12 baronies in County Tipperary. Its chief town is Newport. The barony lies between Ormond Lower to the north, Kilnamanagh Upper to the south and Ormond Upper to the east. To the west lies the River Shannon which separates it from County Clare. The territory is currently administered by Tipperary County Council.

Ikerrin is a barony in County Tipperary, Ireland. This geographical unit of land is one of 12 baronies in County Tipperary. Its chief town is Roscrea. The barony lies between Eliogarty to the south and Ormond Upper to the west. As a "peninsula", it is surrounded on three sides by counties Offaly and Laois. The territory is currently administered by Tipperary County Council.

Eliogarty

Eliogarty is a barony in County Tipperary, Ireland. This geographical unit of land is one of 12 baronies in County Tipperary. Its chief town is Thurles. The barony lies between Ikerrin to the north, Kilnamanagh Upper to the west, Middle Third to the south and County Kilkenny to the east. It is currently administered by Tipperary County Council.

Kilnamanagh Upper is a barony in County Tipperary, Ireland. This geographical unit of land is one of 12 baronies in County Tipperary. Its chief town is Borrisoleigh. The barony lies between Ormond Upper to the north, Kilnamanagh Lower to the south and Eliogarty to the east. It is currently administered by Tipperary County Council.

Clanwilliam is a barony in County Tipperary, Ireland. This geographical unit of land is one of 12 baronies in County Tipperary. Its chief town is Tipperary. The barony lies between Kilnamanagh Lower to the north, Iffa and Offa West to the south and Middle Third to the east. It is currently administered by Tipperary County Council.

Kilnamanagh Lower is a barony in County Tipperary, Ireland. This geographical unit of land is one of 12 baronies in County Tipperary. Its chief town is Dundrum. The barony lies between Kilnamanagh Upper to the north, Clanwilliam to the south and Eliogarty to the east. It is currently administered by Tipperary County Council.

Iffa and Offa West is a barony in County Tipperary, Ireland. This geographical unit of land is one of 12 baronies in County Tipperary. Its chief town is Cahir. The barony lies between Clanwilliam to the north-west, Middle Third to the north-east and Iffa and Offa East to the east. The area is currently administered by Tipperary County Council. The barony is within the geographic remit of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Waterford and Lismore.

Iffa and Offa East is a barony in County Tipperary, Ireland. This geographical unit of land is one of 12 baronies in County Tipperary. Its chief town is Clonmel. The barony lies between Iffa and Offa West to the west, Middle Third to the north-west and Slievardagh to the north-east. It is currently administered by Tipperary County Council. The entire barony lies within the geographic remit of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Waterford and Lismore with the exception of the parish of Clerihan which is in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cashel and Emly.

Middle Third is a barony in County Tipperary, Ireland. This geographical unit of land is one of 12 baronies in County Tipperary. Its chief town is Cashel. The barony lies between Eliogarty to the north, Iffa and Offa East to the south, Clanwilliam to the west and Slievardagh to the east. It is currently administered by Tipperary County Council.

Slievardagh is a barony in County Tipperary, Ireland. This geographical unit of land is one of 12 baronies in County Tipperary. Its chief town is Mullinahone. The barony lies between Eliogarty to the north, Iffa and Offa East to the south and Middle Third to the west. It is currently administered by Tipperary County Council.

Knocktopher (barony) Barony in Leinster, Ireland

The barony of Knocktopher is a barony in the west of County Kilkenny, Ireland. The barony is 46,765 acres (189.25 km2) in size. There are 16 civil parishes made up of 125 townlands. It is one of 12 baronies in the county. The chief town is Mullinavat and it contains the settlements of Stonyford, Ballyhale, Hugginstown, Knocktopher, and Dunnamaggan. The M9 motorway bisects the barony.

References

  1. Tipperary County Council Tipperary County Council, 29 May 2014. Quote: "Tipperary County Council will become an official unified authority on Tuesday, 3rd June 2014. The new authority combines the existing administration of North Tipperary County Council and South Tipperary County Council."
  2. http://www.irishstatutebook.ie/pdf/2014/en.act.2014.0001.pdf [ bare URL ]
  3. "Interactive map (civil parish boundaries viewable in Historic layer)". Mapviewer. Ordnance Survey of Ireland. Retrieved 9 March 2010.
  4. Placenames Database of Ireland - Tipperary civil parishes.
  5. Official Irish Statues website. Local Government Act 1991, (Regional Authorities) (Establishment) Order.
  6. The Doegen Records Web Project (2009). "Recordings of Séamas Ó Liatháin" (in Irish). Royal Irish Academy. Retrieved 18 February 2010.