Special Administration of the Holy See

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The Special Administration of the Holy See (Italian : Amministrazione Speciale della Santa Sede, abbreviated ASSS) was a dicastery of the Roman Curia from 1929 to 1967. It was established by Pope Pius XI on 7 June 1929 to manage the 750 million in cash and 1,000 million in Italian government bonds transferred to the Holy See in implementation of the Financial Convention attached to the Lateran Treaty of 1929. [1]

Contents

In 1967, Pope Paul VI combined the Special Administration of the Holy See and the Administration of the Property of the Holy See into one office, the Administration of the Patrimony of the Apostolic See, erected on 15 August 1967. [2]

Directors

  1. Bernardino Nogara (19291954)
  2. Henri de Maillardoz (19541967)

Secretaries of the Cardinalitial Commission

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References

  1. Annuario Pontificio 2012 ( ISBN   978-88-209-8722-0), p. 1847
  2. Phillipe Levillain. 2002. The Papacy: An Encyclopedia. p. 10; Annuario Pontificio 2012, p. 1846

Bibliography