Speerschneider Point

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Speerschneider Point ( 65°45′S66°10′W / 65.750°S 66.167°W / -65.750; -66.167 Coordinates: 65°45′S66°10′W / 65.750°S 66.167°W / -65.750; -66.167 ) is a point forming the west side of the entrance to Malmgren Bay on the west side of Renaud Island, in the Biscoe Islands. First accurately shown on an Argentine government chart of 1957. Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1959 for C.I.H. Speerschneider, Danish meteorologist, who was editor of the annual reports on the state of the sea ice in the Arctic issued by Dansk Meteorologisk Institut, 1910-34.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Malmgren Bay is a bay indenting the west side of Renaud Island immediately north of Speerschneider Point, in the Biscoe Islands of Antarctica. It was first accurately shown on an Argentine government chart of 1957. The bay was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1959 for Finn A.E.J. Malmgren, the Swedish author in 1927 of an important study on the properties of sea ice.

Renaud Island

Renaud Island is an ice-covered island, 40 km (25 mi) long and from 6.4 to 16.1 km wide, lying between the Pitt Islands and Rabot Island in the Biscoe Islands of Antarctica. It is separated from Pitt Islands to the northeast by Mraka Sound, and from Lavoisier Island to the southwest by Pendleton Strait. Zubov Bay is a 2.5 mile bay that indents the east side of the island.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Speerschneider Point" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

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Geographic Names Information System geographical database

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Thomsen Islands is a group of small islands lying 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) southwest of Speerschneider Point, off the west side of Renaud Island in the Biscoe Islands. First accurately shown on an Argentine government chart of 1957. Named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1959 for Helge Thomsen, Danish meteorologist, who, for a number of years beginning in 1946, was responsible for editing Dansk Meteorologisk Institut's annual reports on the state of the sea ice in the Arctic.