St. Johns, Arizona

Last updated
St. Johns
City of St. Johns
Isaacson building address 1.jpg
Downtown St. Johns
Motto(s): 
Town of Friendly Neighbors [1]
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St. Johns
Location of St. Johns in Arizona
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St. Johns
St. Johns (the United States)
Coordinates: 34°30′7″N109°22′18″W / 34.50194°N 109.37167°W / 34.50194; -109.37167 Coordinates: 34°30′7″N109°22′18″W / 34.50194°N 109.37167°W / 34.50194; -109.37167
Country Flag of the United States.svg  United States
State Flag of Arizona.svg  Arizona
County Apache
Government
  MayorCristian R. Patterson
Area
[2]
  Total2.28 sq mi (5.91 km2)
  Land2.28 sq mi (5.91 km2)
  Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
5,686 ft (1,733 m)
Population
  Total3,480
  Estimate 
(2016) [4]
N/A
Time zone UTC-7 (Arizona Time Zone)
ZIP code
85936
FIPS code 04-62350
GNIS feature ID 10711
Website sjaz.us

St. Johns (Navajo : Tsézhin Deezʼáhí) [5] [6] is the county seat of Apache County, Arizona, United States. [7] It is located along U.S. Route 180, mostly west of where that highway intersects with U.S. Route 191. As of the 2010 census, the population of the city was 3,480. [3]

Navajo language Athabaskan language of Na-Dené stock spoken in the southwestern United States

Navajo or Navaho is a Southern Athabaskan language of the Na-Dené family, by which it is related to languages spoken across the western areas of North America. Navajo is spoken primarily in the Southwestern United States, especially on the Navajo Nation. It is one of the most widely spoken Native American languages and is the most widely spoken north of the Mexico–United States border, with almost 170,000 Americans speaking Navajo at home as of 2011. The language has struggled to keep a healthy speaker base, although this problem has been alleviated to some extent by extensive education programs on the Navajo Nation.

A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in Canada, China, Romania, Taiwan and the United States. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, and historically in Jamaica.

Apache County, Arizona County in the United States

Apache County is located in the northeast corner of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2010 census its population was 71,518. The county seat is St. Johns.

Contents

History

The location was originally called Tsézhin Deezʼáhí in Navajo, a reference to its rock formations. [5] The site of a useful crossing of the Little Colorado River, it was later called El Vadito (Spanish for "the little crossing") by Spaniards as they first explored the area. Starting in 1864, a trader named Solomon Barth began crossing the area as he moved salt from a salt lake in Zuni territory to Prescott, Arizona. In a poker game in 1873 Barth earned enough money to purchase cattle and enough land in St. Johns to start a ranch with his brothers Nathan and Morris. He changed the name from El Vadito to San Juan. There is some controversy as to whether this was in honor of the first woman resident, Maria San Juan Baca de Padilla, or of the feast of San Juan. William R. Milligan arrived in 1866, followed by Frank Walker in 1870. By 1872 a Spanish-American agricultural community had developed. A stone cabin was erected by Juan Sedilla in 1874. Solomon Barth sold out to Mormon Ammon M. Tenney in 1875 or 1879. A Mormon community named Salem and led by David King Udall was established just north of the town under the direction of Wilford Woodruff on March 29, 1880, and then moved to higher ground by Erastus Snow on September 19 of the same year. [8] [9] [10]

Little Colorado River river in the United States of America

The Little Colorado River is a tributary of the Colorado River in the U.S. state of Arizona, providing the principal drainage from the Painted Desert region. Together with its major tributary, the Puerco River, it drains an area of about 26,500 square miles (69,000 km2) in eastern Arizona and western New Mexico. Although it stretches almost 340 miles (550 km), only the headwaters and the lowermost reaches flow year-round. Between St. Johns and Cameron, most of the river is a wide, braided wash, only containing water after heavy snowmelt or flash flooding.

Prescott, Arizona City in Arizona, United States

Prescott is a city in Yavapai County, Arizona, United States. According to the 2010 Census, the population of the city is 39,843. The city is the county seat of Yavapai County. In 1864 Prescott was designated as the capital of the Arizona Territory, replacing the temporary capital at Fort Whipple. The Territorial Capital was moved to Tucson in 1867. Prescott again became the Territorial Capital in 1877, until Phoenix became the capital in 1889.

Ammon Meshach Tenney was an American Mormon missionary and colonizer in Arizona, New Mexico and Mexico, who taught the message of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to peoples of the Zuni and the Isleta Pueblos, baptizing hundreds. He also was the first president of the Mexican Mission after it was reorganized in 1901.

St. Johns has been the county seat for almost all of Apache County's history. When the county was created on February 24, 1879, Snowflake was designated the county seat. [11] After the first election in fall 1879, county government was set up in St. Johns, though it was moved again in 1880, to Springerville; in 1882 St. Johns again became the county seat, and it has remained so ever since. [12] [11]

Snowflake, Arizona Town in Arizona, United States

Snowflake is a town in Navajo County, Arizona, United States. It was founded in 1878 by Erastus Snow and William Jordan Flake, Mormon pioneers and colonizers. It has frequently been noted on lists of unusual place names. According to 2012 Census Bureau estimates, the population of the town is 5,564.

Springerville, Arizona Town in Arizona, United States

Springerville is a town in Apache County, Arizona, United States, within the White Mountains. Its postal ZIP code is 85938. As of the 2010 census, the population of the town was 1,961.

Geography and climate

St. Johns is located at 34°30′7″N109°22′18″W / 34.50194°N 109.37167°W / 34.50194; -109.37167 (34.501921, -109.371543), [13] in the White Mountains in northeast Arizona. [14] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 26.1 square miles (67.6 km2), of which 25.9 square miles (67.1 km2) is land and 0.19 square miles (0.5 km2), or 0.68%, is water. [15]

White Mountains (Arizona)

The White Mountains of Arizona are a mountain range and mountainous region in the eastern part of the state, near the border with New Mexico; it is a continuation from the west of the Arizona transition zone–Mogollon Rim, with the Rim ending in western New Mexico. The White Mountains are a part of the Colorado Plateau high country of Northeast Arizona, the Navajo Nation, with the rest of the Plateau in eastern Utah, northwest New Mexico, and southwestern Colorado. Nearby communities include Show Low, Pinetop-Lakeside, Greer, Springerville, Eagar, and McNary. Much of the range is within the Fort Apache Indian Reservation.

Northeast Arizona

Northeast Arizona is a region of the U.S. state of Arizona commonly including Apache County and Navajo County. Some notable towns there are St. Johns, Eagar, Holbrook, Show Low, Winslow, Window Rock, Fort Defiance, Ganado, Chinle, and Kayenta.

United States Census Bureau Bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

The climate is cold semi-arid (BSk) with cold, dry winters and hot summers with relatively greater precipitation via erratic thunderstorms. Large diurnal temperature variations are typical, so that warm days are often followed by freezing nights.

Semi-arid climate climat with precipitation below potential evapotranspiration

A semi-arid climate or steppe climate is the climate of a region that receives precipitation below potential evapotranspiration, but not as low as a desert climate. There are different kinds of semi-arid climates, depending on variables such as temperature, and they give rise to different biomes.

Thunderstorm type of weather

A thunderstorm, also known as an electrical storm or a lightning storm, is a storm characterized by the presence of lightning and its acoustic effect on the Earth's atmosphere, known as thunder. Relatively weak thunderstorms are sometimes called thundershowers. Thunderstorms occur in a type of cloud known as a cumulonimbus. They are usually accompanied by strong winds, and often produce heavy rain and sometimes snow, sleet, or hail, but some thunderstorms produce little precipitation or no precipitation at all. Thunderstorms may line up in a series or become a rainband, known as a squall line. Strong or severe thunderstorms include some of the most dangerous weather phenomena, including large hail, strong winds, and tornadoes. Some of the most persistent severe thunderstorms, known as supercells, rotate as do cyclones. While most thunderstorms move with the mean wind flow through the layer of the troposphere that they occupy, vertical wind shear sometimes causes a deviation in their course at a right angle to the wind shear direction.

Climate data for St. Johns, Arizona
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)73
(23)
90
(32)
85
(29)
95
(35)
99
(37)
103
(39)
104
(40)
104
(40)
99
(37)
92
(33)
82
(28)
78
(26)
104
(40)
Average high °F (°C)48.7
(9.3)
55.0
(12.8)
61.3
(16.3)
69.6
(20.9)
78.2
(25.7)
87.9
(31.1)
89.5
(31.9)
86.9
(30.5)
81.7
(27.6)
71.3
(21.8)
58.4
(14.7)
48.9
(9.4)
69.8
(21.0)
Daily mean °F (°C)34.1
(1.2)
39.1
(3.9)
45.2
(7.3)
51.8
(11.0)
60.5
(15.8)
69.6
(20.9)
73.8
(23.2)
71.7
(22.1)
65.6
(18.7)
54.5
(12.5)
42.3
(5.7)
34.0
(1.1)
53.5
(11.9)
Average low °F (°C)19.5
(−6.9)
23.1
(−4.9)
29.0
(−1.7)
33.9
(1.1)
42.8
(6.0)
51.2
(10.7)
58.1
(14.5)
56.4
(13.6)
49.5
(9.7)
37.6
(3.1)
26.2
(−3.2)
19.1
(−7.2)
37.2
(2.9)
Record low °F (°C)−29
(−34)
−13
(−25)
−7
(−22)
7
(−14)
21
(−6)
25
(−4)
38
(3)
38
(3)
23
(−5)
13
(−11)
−21
(−29)
−25
(−32)
−29
(−34)
Average precipitation inches (mm)0.75
(19)
0.56
(14)
0.76
(19)
0.45
(11)
0.46
(12)
0.49
(12)
1.72
(44)
2.33
(59)
1.42
(36)
1.17
(30)
0.66
(17)
0.70
(18)
11.47
(291)
Average snowfall inches (cm)4.1
(10)
1.9
(4.8)
2.6
(6.6)
1.1
(2.8)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.3
(0.76)
1.6
(4.1)
3.4
(8.6)
15
(37.66)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in)3.63.64.02.52.62.77.78.85.44.12.83.351.1
Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in)1.10.81.00.4000000.10.61.15.1
Source: NOAA [16]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1880 546
1890 482−11.7%
1910 835
1920 1,38666.0%
1930 1,3860.0%
1950 1,469
1960 1,310−10.8%
1970 1,3200.8%
1980 3,368155.2%
1990 3,294−2.2%
2000 3,269−0.8%
2010 3,4806.5%
U.S. Decennial Census [17]

As of the census [18] of 2000, there were 3,269 people, 989 households, and 805 families residing in the city. The population density was 494.8 people per square mile (190.9/km²). There were 1,392 housing units at an average density of 210.7 per square mile (81.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 80.48% White, 0.37% African American, 6.24% Native American, 0.28% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 9.12% from other races, and 3.49% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 23.19% of the population.

There were 989 households out of which 44.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.7% were married couples living together, 10.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.6% were non-families. 15.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.19 and the average family size was 3.55.

In the city, the age distribution of the population shows 35.5% under the age of 18, 8.4% from 18 to 24, 24.0% from 25 to 44, 21.7% from 45 to 64, and 10.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females, there were 101.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $35,215, and the median income for a family was $37,478. Males had a median income of $38,477 versus $24,009 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,331. About 12.5% of families and 15.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.2% of those under age 18 and 10.8% of those age 65 or over.

Attractions

St. Johns is home to the Apache County Historical Society Museum and has four National Register of Historic Places:

St. Johns is near the Placerias Quarry, the site where dozens of Placerias fossils were discovered in 1930 by Charles Camp and Samuel Welles, of the University of California, Berkeley.

St. Johns is along the shortest and most scenic route from Phoenix to Albuquerque, New Mexico. [14] Within an hour's drive from St. John's are Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest, [19] Petrified Forest National Park, the Painted Desert, and Lyman Lake State Park, as well as Indian reservations such as the Navajo Nation, Fort Apache Indian Reservation, San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation, and Zuni Indian Reservation. [14]

Annual events

Education

Primary and secondary schools

St. Johns is served by the St. Johns Unified School District. The city is served by Coronado Elementary School, St. Johns Middle School, and St. Johns High School. [20] The city is home to the St Johns Center of Northland Pioneer College.

Public libraries

The Apache County Library District has its headquarters facility and the St. Johns Public Library in St. Johns. [21] [22]

Notable people

Udall family Udall Political Family.jpg
Udall family

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. Official website of St. Johns
  2. "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jul 18, 2017.
  3. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2014-08-31.
  4. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  5. 1 2 Wilson, A. Navajo Place Names Audio Forum 1995 ISBN   0-88432-825-2
  6. Young, Robert W. and William Morgan, Sr. The Navajo Language. Revised Ed. Albuquerque, New Mexico: 1987. p.732, column1, entry 27
  7. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  8. Byrd H. Granger (1960). Arizona Place Names. University of Arizona Press. p. 21. Retrieved 8 December 2011.
  9. Andrew Jensen. Encyclopedic History of the Church. p. 732
  10. teax of monument in St. Johns about Salem Archived 2012-03-13 at the Wayback Machine
  11. 1 2 Official website of Apache County, Arizona
  12. Byrd H. Granger (1960). Arizona Place Names. University of Arizona Press. p. 18. Retrieved 6 December 2011.
  13. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  14. 1 2 3 St. Johns, Arizona from the Travel & Explore section of The Arizona Republic website
  15. "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): St. Johns city, Arizona". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved April 16, 2013.
  16. "Climatography of the United States No. 20 (1971–2000)" (PDF). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2004. Retrieved 2012-04-11.[ permanent dead link ]
  17. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2016.
  18. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  19. Recreation and Leisure Archived 2009-02-04 at the Wayback Machine from the city's official website
  20. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2008-12-10. Retrieved 2008-11-19.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  21. "Home Archived 2011-01-29 at the Wayback Machine ." Apache County Library District. Retrieved on January 30, 2011. "Apache County Library District PO Box 2760 30 South 2nd West St Johns, Arizona 85936"
  22. "St. Johns Public Library [ permanent dead link ]." Apache County Library District. Retrieved on January 30, 2011.