St John Brodrick (died 1728)

Last updated

The Honourable St John Brodrick (c. 1685 – 21 February 1728), was an Anglo-Irish politician who sat in the Irish House of Commons from 1709 to 1728 and in the British House of Commons from 1721 to 1727.

Brodrick was a son of Alan Brodrick, 1st Viscount Midleton and brother of Alan Brodrick, 2nd Viscount Midleton; his mother was his father's first wife, Catherine Barry, daughter of Redmond Barry of Rathcormac. He predeceased his father by some months.

Broderick represented Castlemartyr in the Irish House of Commons from 1709 to 1713, the City of Cork from 1713 to 1715 and then the County of Cork from 1715 to his death. On 9 June 1724, he was appointed to the Irish Privy Council. He was also returned as Member of Parliament for Bere Alston on petition on 6 June 1721 after a by-election and returned unopposed at the 1722 general election. [1]

As an MP he gravely embarrassed his father by voting regularly against the Government. Lord Midleton tried to brush over the matter in his private correspondence by excusing his son as a headstrong young man, not easily controlled even by his formidable father, whose bad temper was notorious.

By his wife Anne Hill, daughter of Michael Hill of Hillsborough and sister of Trevor Hill, 1st Viscount Hillsborough and Arthur Hill-Trevor, 1st Viscount Dungannon, he had at least four daughters. One, Anne, married James Jefferyes of Blarney Castle, son of Sir James Jeffreys and father of James St John Jeffreyes. Another, Mary, married Sir John Redmond Freke, 3rd Baronet.

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Midleton</span> Town in Munster, Ireland

Midleton is a town in south-eastern County Cork, Ireland. It lies approximately 16 km east of Cork City on the Owenacurra River and the N25 road, which connects Cork to the port of Rosslare. A satellite town of Cork City, Midleton is part of Metropolitan Cork. It is the central hub of business for the East Cork Area. Midleton is within the Cork East Dáil constituency.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Viscount Midleton</span> Formal title

Viscount Midleton, of Midleton in the County of Cork, is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1717 for Alan Brodrick, 1st Baron Brodrick, the Lord Chancellor of Ireland and former Speaker of the Irish House of Commons. He was created Baron Brodrick, of Midleton in the County of Cork, in 1715 in the same peerage. His grandson, the third Viscount, co-represented Ashburton then New Shoreham in the British House of Commons. His son, the fourth Viscount, sat similarly for Whitchurch for 22 years. In 1796 he was created Baron Brodrick, of Peper Harrow in the County of Surrey, in the Peerage of Great Britain, with a special remainder to the heirs male of his father, the third Viscount. On the death of his son, the fifth Viscount, this line of the family failed.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Richard Lumley, 1st Earl of Scarbrough</span> English soldier and statesman

Richard Lumley, 1st Earl of Scarbrough, was an English soldier and statesman best known for his role in the Glorious Revolution.

John Forster was an Irish lawyer, politician and judge.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">St John Brodrick, 1st Earl of Midleton</span> British politician

William St John Fremantle Brodrick, 1st Earl of Midleton, KP, PC, DL, styled as St John Brodrick until 1907 and as Viscount Midleton between 1907 and 1920, was a British Conservative and Irish Unionist Alliance politician. He served as a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1880 to 1906, as a government minister from 1886 to 1892 and from 1895 to 1900, and as a Cabinet minister from 1900 to 1905.

Trevor Hill, 1st Viscount Hillsborough was an Anglo-Irish landowner and politician who sat in the Irish House of Commons from 1713 to 1715 and in the British House of Commons from 1715 to 1722.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Alan Brodrick, 1st Viscount Midleton</span>

Alan Brodrick, 1st Viscount Midleton, PC (Ire) was a leading Irish lawyer and politician who sat in the Parliament of Ireland between 1692 and 1715 and in the British House of Commons from 1717 to 1728. He was Speaker of the Irish House of Commons and Lord Chancellor of Ireland. Although he was a man of great gifts, he was so hot-tempered that even Jonathan Swift is said to have been afraid of him.

Midleton was a constituency represented in the Irish House of Commons until 1800. Incorporated by Charter, 1671 whereby it was granted to Sir John Brodrick with a Corporation sovereign, two bailiffs and 12 burgesses. It was disenfranchised at the Act of Union and compensation of £15,000 paid to Viscount Midleton.

Charles Brodrick was a reforming Irish clergyman and Archbishop of Cashel in the Church of Ireland.

James Cotter the Younger, or James Cotter of Anngrove, was the son of Sir James Fitz Edmond Cotter who had commanded King James's Irish Army forces in the Counties of Cork, Limerick, and Kerry. His mother was Eleanor/Ellen Plunkett, daughter of Matthew, 7th Lord Louth, and he was a member of the Irish Cotter family, which had Norse-Gaelic origins. He was a key figure in the 1713 Dublin election riot.

Henry Petty, 1st Earl of Shelburne PC (I) was an Anglo-Irish peer and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1715 to 1727.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">George Brodrick, 4th Viscount Midleton</span>

George Brodrick, 4th Viscount Midleton was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1774 to 1796, when he was raised to the peerage of Great Britain as Baron Brodrick.

Thomas Brodrick was an Irish and British politician who sat in the Irish House of Commons between 1692 and 1727 and also in the British House of Commons from 1713 to 1727. He owned lands in both Surrey in England, and County Cork, Ireland.

Sir St John Brodrick, of Midleton was an Irish Member of Parliament.

Arthur Hill-Trevor, 1st Viscount Dungannon, was an Irish politician.

John O'Neill, 1st Viscount O'Neill PC was an Irish politician.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">John Redmond Freke</span>

Sir John Redmond Freke, 3rd Baronet was a baronet in the Baronetage of Great Britain and a Member of Parliament in the Irish House of Commons.

The Recorder of Cork was a judicial office holder in pre-Independence Ireland. The Recorder was the chief magistrate of Cork city: his principal duty was to keep the peace. The office was very similar to that of the Recorder of Dublin, except that the Recorder of Cork, unlike his Dublin counterpart, did not have power to preside over any trial charging a capital crime. A statute of 1877 stated that wherever possible the Recorder should also be the Chairman of the Cork East Riding Quarter Sessions. The office of Recorder of Cork, like the Recorder of Dublin, was an onerous one, involving at least two sittings of the Court every week; most of the time the Recorder had a Deputy Recorder to assist him.

References

  1. "BRODRICK, Hon. St. John (c.1685-1728)". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 23 September 2018.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Bere Alston
1721–1727
With: Lawrence Carter 1721-1722
Sir John Hobart 1722-1724
Sir Robert Rich 1724-1727
Succeeded by