Stan Getz

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Stan Getz
Getz&BakerSandvika1983a.jpg
Stan Getz in 1983
Background information
Birth nameStanley Gayetski
Born(1927-02-02)February 2, 1927
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
DiedJune 6, 1991(1991-06-06) (aged 64)
Malibu, California, U.S.
Genres
Instruments
  • Tenor saxophone
  • baritone saxophone
Years active1943–91
Labels

Stan Getz (born Stanley Gayetski; February 2, 1927 – June 6, 1991) was an American jazz saxophonist. Playing primarily the tenor saxophone, Getz was known as "The Sound" because of his warm, lyrical tone, his prime influence being the wispy, mellow timbre of his idol, Lester Young. Coming to prominence in the late 1940s with Woody Herman's big band, Getz is described by critic Scott Yanow as "one of the all-time great tenor saxophonists". [1] Getz performed in bebop and cool jazz groups. Influenced by João Gilberto and Antônio Carlos Jobim, he popularized bossa nova in America with the hit single "The Girl from Ipanema" (1964).

Jazz is a music genre that originated in the African-American communities of New Orleans, United States. It originated in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and developed from roots in blues and ragtime. Jazz is seen by many as "America's classical music". Since the 1920s Jazz Age, jazz has become recognized as a major form of musical expression. It then emerged in the form of independent traditional and popular musical styles, all linked by the common bonds of African-American and European-American musical parentage with a performance orientation. Jazz is characterized by swing and blue notes, call and response vocals, polyrhythms and improvisation. Jazz has roots in West African cultural and musical expression, and in African-American music traditions including blues and ragtime, as well as European military band music. Intellectuals around the world have hailed jazz as "one of America's original art forms".

Lester Young American jazz tenor saxophonist and sometime clarinetist

Lester Willis Young, nicknamed "Pres" or "Prez", was an American jazz tenor saxophonist and occasional clarinetist.

Woody Herman American clarinetist

Woodrow Charles Herman was an American jazz clarinetist, saxophonist, singer, and big band leader. Leading various groups called "The Herd", Herman came to prominence in the late 1930s and was active until his death in 1987. His bands often played music that was cutting edge and experimental for its time; they received numerous Grammy nominations and awards.

Contents

Early life

Getz was born Stanley Gayetski on February 2, 1927, at St. Vincent's Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. [2] Getz's father Al was born in Mile End, London, in 1904, while his mother Goldie (née Yampolsky) was born in Philadelphia in 1907. His paternal grandparents Harris and Beckie Gayetski were originally from the Kiev area of the Russian Empire (now Ukraine) but had migrated to escapee the pogroms in the Russian Empire to Whitechapel, in the East End of London. There, they owned the Harris Tailor Shop at 52 Oxford Street for more than 13 years. In 1913, Harris and Beckie emigrated to the United States with their three sons Al, Phil, and Ben, following their son Louis Gayetski who had emigrated to the US the year before.

Philadelphia Largest city in Pennsylvania

Philadelphia, known colloquially as Philly, is the largest city in the U.S. state and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the sixth-most populous U.S. city, with a 2018 census-estimated population of 1,584,138. Since 1854, the city has had the same geographic boundaries as Philadelphia County, the most populous county in Pennsylvania and the urban core of the eighth-largest U.S. metropolitan statistical area, with over 6 million residents as of 2017. Philadelphia is also the economic and cultural anchor of the greater Delaware Valley, located along the lower Delaware and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis. The Delaware Valley's population of 7.2 million ranks it as the eighth-largest combined statistical area in the United States.

Pennsylvania U.S. state in the United States

Pennsylvania, officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the Northeastern, Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. The Appalachian Mountains run through its middle. The Commonwealth is bordered by Delaware to the southeast, Maryland to the south, West Virginia to the southwest, Ohio to the west, Lake Erie and the Canadian province of Ontario to the northwest, New York to the north, and New Jersey to the east.

Mile End district within East London, England

Mile End is a district in the East End of London, England, 3.6 miles (5.8 km) east-northeast of Charing Cross. Situated on the London-to-Colchester road, it was one of the earliest suburbs of the City of London. It became part of the metropolitan area of London in 1855, and is connected to the London Underground.

The Getz family first settled in Philadelphia, but during the Depression the family moved to New York City, seeking better employment opportunities. Getz worked hard in school, receiving straight As, and finished sixth grade close to the top of his class. Getz's major interest was in musical instruments and he played a number of them before his father bought him his first saxophone at the age of 13. Even though his father also got him a clarinet, Getz instantly fell in love with the saxophone and began practicing eight hours a day.

Great Depression 20th-century worldwide economic depression

The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations; in most countries, it started in 1929 and lasted until the late 1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how intensely the world's economy can decline.

He attended James Monroe High School in the Bronx. In 1941, he was accepted into the All City High School Orchestra of New York City. This gave him a chance to receive private, free tutoring from the New York Philharmonic's Simon Kovar, a bassoon player. He also continued playing the saxophone. He eventually dropped out of school in order to pursue his musical career, but was later sent back to the classroom by the school system's truancy officers. [1]

James Monroe High School is a former comprehensive high school located at 1300 Boynton Avenue at East 172nd Street in the Soundview section of the Bronx, New York City.

Simon Kovar was a 20th-century bassoonist and one of the most renowned teachers of the instrument.

Bassoon musical instrument

The bassoon is a woodwind instrument in the double reed family that plays music written in the bass and tenor clefs, and occasionally the treble. Appearing in its modern form in the 19th century, the bassoon figures prominently in orchestral, concert band, and chamber music literature. It is known for its distinctive tone colour, wide range, variety of character, and agility. One who plays the bassoon is called a bassoonist.

In 1943, at the age of 16, [3] he was accepted into Jack Teagarden's band, and because of his youth he became Teagarden's ward. [2] Getz also played along with Nat King Cole and Lionel Hampton. After playing for Stan Kenton, Jimmy Dorsey, and Benny Goodman, Getz was a soloist with Woody Herman from 1947 to 1949 [2] in "The Second Herd", and he first gained wide attention as one of the band's saxophonists, who were known collectively as "The Four Brothers"; the others being Serge Chaloff, Zoot Sims and Herbie Steward. [3] With Herman, he had a hit with "Early Autumn" and after Getz left "The Second Herd" he was able to launch his solo career. He was the leader on almost all of his recording sessions after 1950. [2]

Jack Teagarden American jazz musician

Weldon Leo "Jack" Teagarden was an American jazz trombonist and singer. According to critic Scott Yannow of Allmusic, Teagarden was the preeminent American jazz trombone player before the bebop era of the 1940s and "one of the best jazz singers too". Teagarden's early career was as a sideman with the likes of Tommy Dorsey, Paul Whiteman and lifelong friend Louis Armstrong before branching out as a bandleader in 1939 and specializing in New Orleans Jazz-style jazz until his death.

Nat King Cole American singer and jazz pianist

Nathaniel Adams Coles, known professionally as Nat King Cole, was an American jazz pianist and vocalist. He recorded over one hundred songs that became hits on the pop charts. His trio was the model for small jazz ensembles that followed. Cole also acted in films and on television and performed on Broadway. He was the first African American man to host an American television series.

Lionel Hampton American jazz vibraphonist, pianist, percussionist, bandleader and actor

Lionel Leo Hampton was an American jazz vibraphonist, pianist, percussionist, and bandleader. Hampton worked with jazz musicians from Teddy Wilson, Benny Goodman, and Buddy Rich to Charlie Parker, Charles Mingus, and Quincy Jones. In 1992, he was inducted into the Alabama Jazz Hall of Fame, and was awarded the National Medal of Arts in 1996.

Career

Getz's reputation was greatly enhanced by his featured performance on Johnny Smith's 1952 album Moonlight in Vermont , that year's top jazz album. The single of the title tune became a hit that stayed on the charts for months. [4]

Johnny Henry Smith II was an American cool jazz and mainstream jazz guitarist. He wrote "Walk, Don't Run" in 1954. In 1984, Smith was inducted into the Alabama Jazz Hall of Fame.

<i>Moonlight in Vermont</i> (album) 1956 studio album by Johnny Smith

Moonlight in Vermont is a 1956 compilation album by jazz guitarist Johnny Smith, featuring tenor saxophonist Stan Getz. The material on the album was recorded between 1952 and 1953, and was drawn from two 10-inch Lps, both titled "Jazz at NBC", which were previously issued by the Royal Roost label. Titled for Smith's breakthrough hit song, it was the No.1 Jazz Album for 1956. It was popularly and critically well received and has come to be regarded as an important album in Smith's discography, in the cool jazz genre and in the evolution of jazz guitar. Notable songs on the album, which reveal the influence of Smith's experiences with the NBC Studio Orchestra, and as a multi-instrument musician, include the title track and the original composition "Jaguar". The title track, singled out for its virtuosity, was a highly influential rendition of a jazz standard that secured Smith's position in the public eye.

In the mid to late 1950s working from Scandinavia, Getz became popular playing cool jazz with Horace Silver, Johnny Smith, Oscar Peterson, and many others. His first two quintets were notable for their personnel, including Charlie Parker's rhythm section of drummer Roy Haynes, pianist Al Haig and bassist Tommy Potter. A 1953 line-up of the Dizzy Gillespie/Stan Getz Sextet featured Gillespie, Getz, Peterson, Herb Ellis, Ray Brown and Max Roach. [1]

Returning to the U.S. from Europe in 1961, Getz became a central figure in introducing bossa nova music to the American audience. [2] Teaming with guitarist Charlie Byrd, who had just returned from a U.S. State Department tour of Brazil, Getz recorded Jazz Samba in 1962 and it quickly became a hit. Getz won the Grammy for Best Jazz Performance of 1963 for "Desafinado", from the same album. It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc. [5] His second bossa nova album, also recorded in 1962, was Big Band Bossa Nova with composer and arranger Gary McFarland. As a follow-up, Getz recorded the album, Jazz Samba Encore! , with one of the originators of bossa nova, Brazilian guitarist Luiz Bonfá. It also sold more than a million copies by 1964, giving Getz his second gold disc. [5]

He then recorded the album Getz/Gilberto , in 1963, [6] with Antônio Carlos Jobim, João Gilberto and his wife, Astrud Gilberto. Their "The Girl from Ipanema" won a Grammy Award. The piece became one of the most well-known Latin jazz tracks. Getz/Gilberto won two Grammys (Best Album and Best Single). A live album, Getz/Gilberto Vol. 2 , followed, as did Getz Au Go Go (1964), a live recording at the Cafe au Go Go. Getz's love affair with Astrud Gilberto brought an end to his musical partnership with her and her husband, and he began to move away from bossa nova and back to cool jazz. While still working with the Gilbertos, he recorded the jazz album Nobody Else but Me (1964), with a new quartet including vibraphonist Gary Burton, but Verve Records, wishing to continue building the Getz brand with bossa nova, refused to release it. It came out 30 years later, after Getz had died.

In 1972, Getz recorded the jazz fusion album Captain Marvel with Chick Corea, Tony Williams and Stanley Clarke, and in this period experimented with an Echoplex on his saxophone. He had a cameo in the film The Exterminator (1980).

In the mid-1980s, Getz worked regularly in the San Francisco Bay area and taught at Stanford University as an artist-in-residence at the Stanford Jazz Workshop until 1988. [7] In 1986, he was inducted into the Down Beat Jazz Hall of Fame. During 1988, Getz worked with Huey Lewis and the News on their Small World album. He played the extended solo on part 2 of the title track, which became a minor hit single.

His tenor saxophone of choice was the Selmer Mark VI.

Personal life

With his granddaughter Katie in 1987 at the Lincoln Center Dad Katie 1987 Lincoln Center2.jpg
With his granddaughter Katie in 1987 at the Lincoln Center

Getz married Beverly Byrne, a vocalist with the Gene Krupa band, on November 7, 1946 in Los Angeles; they had three children together, Steve, David and Beverly. As a teenager, Getz had become involved with drugs and alcohol. In 1954, he was arrested for attempting to rob a pharmacy for morphine. As he was being processed in the prison ward of Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, Beverly gave birth to their third child one floor below.[ citation needed ]

Getz was divorced from Byrne in Nevada on November 3, 1956, after which he married Monica Silfverskiöld, [8] daughter of Swedish physician and former Olympic medalist Nils Silfverskiöld. They had two children, Pamela and Nicolaus. The couple lived in Copenhagen, Denmark, partly to escape Getz's legal problems.[ citation needed ]

In 1964, Getz traveled to Brazil to work with João Gilberto, famed creator of bossa nova. While recording the influential album Getz/Gilberto , Gilberto introduced Getz to his wife, Astrud Gilberto, who sang two of the tracks on the album. After the album was recorded, Getz returned to the United States, and Astrud Gilberto went with him, divorcing João Gilberto. Getz and Astrud Gilberto maintained a personal and musical relationship for many years, though they never married, possibly because Getz was unable to obtain a divorce.[ citation needed ]

Getz filed for divorce from Monica Getz in 1981, [9] but the petition was not granted until 1987. [10] Monica Getz asserted in divorce court that her husband had been abusive towards his children and occasionally towards her. [9] In 1990, Monica Getz petitioned the United States Supreme Court to have their divorce verdict overturned on the grounds that the New York law requiring settlement agreements to be heard in trial court instead of family court discriminated against women who, like her, could be bankrupted by paying trial lawyers. [9] The Supreme Court declined to hear the case. [10]

Zoot Sims, who had known Getz since their time with Herman, once described him as "a nice bunch of guys", alluding to the wide range of his personality.[ citation needed ]

Death

Getz died of liver cancer on June 6, 1991. His ashes were poured from his saxophone case six miles off the coast of Marina del Rey, California.

In 1998, the Stan Getz Media Center and Library at Berklee College of Music was dedicated through a donation from the Herb Alpert Foundation.

Discography

Awards

Bibliography

Related Research Articles

Bossa nova is a style of Brazilian music, which was developed and popularized in the 1950s and 1960s and is today one of the best-known Brazilian music styles abroad. The phrase bossa nova means literally "new trend" or "new wave". A lyrical fusion of samba and jazz, bossa nova acquired a large following in the 1960s, initially among young musicians and college students.

The 7th Annual Grammy Awards were held on April 13, 1965, at Beverly Hilton Hotel, Beverly Hills. They recognized accomplishments of musicians for the year 1964. João Gilberto & Stan Getz won 4 awards.

Antônio Carlos Jobim Brazilian songwriter, composer, arranger, singer, and pianist/guitarist

Antônio Carlos Brasileiro de Almeida Jobim, also known as Tom Jobim, was a Brazilian composer, pianist, songwriter, arranger and singer. Widely considered as one of the great exponents of Brazilian music, Jobim internationalized bossa nova and, with the help of important American artists, merged it with jazz in the 1960s to create a new sound with remarkable popular success. As such he is sometimes known as the "father of bossa nova".

João Gilberto Brazilian musician

João Gilberto Prado Pereira de Oliveira, known as João Gilberto, was a Brazilian singer, songwriter, and guitarist, who was a pioneer of the musical genre of bossa nova in the late 1950s. Around the world he was often called "father of bossa nova"; in his native Brazil, he was referred to as "O Mito".

The Girl from Ipanema Song by Antônio Carlos Jobim

"Garota de Ipanema" is a Brazilian bossa nova and jazz song. It was a worldwide hit in the mid-1960s and won a Grammy for Record of the Year in 1965. It was written in 1962, with music by Antônio Carlos Jobim and Portuguese lyrics by Vinicius de Moraes. English lyrics were written later by Norman Gimbel.

<i>Getz/Gilberto</i> album by Stan Getz and João Gilberto

Getz/Gilberto is an album by American saxophonist Stan Getz and Brazilian guitarist João Gilberto, featuring pianist and composer Antônio Carlos Jobim, who also composed many of the tracks. It was released in March 1964 on Verve Records. The album features the vocals of Astrud Gilberto on two tracks, "Garota de Ipanema" and "Corcovado". The artwork was done by artist Olga Albizu. Getz/Gilberto is a jazz and bossa nova album, and includes tracks such as "Desafinado", "Corcovado", and "Garota de Ipanema", the last of which received a Grammy Award for Record of the Year, and launched Astrud Gilberto to international stardom. "Doralice" and "Para Machucar Meu Coração" strengthened Gilberto's and Jobim's respect for the tradition of pre-bossa nova samba.

Creed Taylor American record producer

Creed Taylor is an American record producer, best known for his work with CTI Records, which he founded in 1968. His career also included periods at Bethlehem Records, ABC-Paramount, Verve, and A&M Records. In the 1960s, he signed bossa nova artists from Brazil to record in the US, such as Antonio Carlos Jobim, Eumir Deodato, João and Astrud Gilberto, among others.

<i>Jazz Samba</i> 1962 studio album by Stan Getz & Charlie Byrd

Jazz Samba is a bossa nova album by Stan Getz and Charlie Byrd released by Verve Records in 1962. Jazz Samba signaled the beginning of the bossa nova craze in America. Stan Getz was the featured soloist and the tracks were arranged by Charlie Byrd, who had first heard bossa nova during a tour of Brazil in 1961.

<i>Getz/Gilberto Vol. 2</i> live album by Stan Getz

Getz/Gilberto #2 is a live album by Stan Getz and João Gilberto, released in 1966. It was recorded at a live concert at Carnegie Hall in October 1964. The previous album Getz/Gilberto won the 1965 Grammy Awards for Best Album of the Year and Best Jazz Instrumental Album - Individual or Group amongst others. The painting on the cover is by Olga Albizu.

"Corcovado" is a bossa nova song written by Antônio Carlos Jobim in 1960. An English lyric was later written by Gene Lees. The Portuguese title refers to the Corcovado mountain in Rio de Janeiro. Andy Williams recorded the song with English lyrics, reaching #92 in the Billboard Hot 100 and #18 in the Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks chart in 1965. Also receiving air-play, contemporaneously with Andy Williams' recording of "Quiet Nights," was Kitty Kallen's version. Her album, titled "Quiet Nights," was released by 20th Century-Fox Records in 1964.

"How Insensitive" is a bossa nova song composed by Brazilian musician Antônio Carlos Jobim. The lyrics were written in Portuguese by Vinícius de Moraes and in English by Norman Gimbel. In Brazil the song goes by the title "Insensatez", though it translates more accurately to "How Foolish". The song resembles Chopin's prelude in E minor.

João Donato Brazilian musician

João Donato de Oliveira Neto is a Brazilian jazz and bossa nova pianist from Brazil. He first worked with Altamiro Carrilho and went on to perform with Antonio Carlos Jobim and Astrud Gilberto.

<i>Stan Getz Meets João & Astrud Gilberto</i> 1990 live album by Stan Getz, João Gilberto, Astrud Gilberto

Stan Getz meets João & Astrud Gilberto: New York 1964 is a live recording of bossa nova in the making. In 1990, the Giants of Jazz label released a live recording of a 1964 New York City performance featuring Stan Getz, João Gilberto and Astrud Gilberto, his then-wife. The album, entitled Stan Getz meets João & Astrud Gilberto is actually misleading: the trio had met previously in 1963 for the recording of the wildly successful album Getz/Gilberto, which was released in 1964 and set off the bossa nova frenzy in the U.S. As a result of that album’s success, the Brazilian Gilbertos and the American Getz played a number of shows in the U.S., such as the one recorded here. Released as part of the “Immortal Concerts” series, this recording exhibits the chemistry the three obviously shared and captures bossa nova in its infancy, as it was still being created and defined.

"Samba de uma Nota Só" is a bossa nova song composed by Antônio Carlos Jobim with Portuguese lyrics by Newton Mendonça. The English lyrics were written by Jon Hendricks. It was first recorded by João Gilberto in 1960 for his album O Amor, o Sorriso e a Flor.

Astrud Gilberto Brazilian singer

Astrud Gilberto is a Brazilian samba and bossa nova singer. She became popular in the 1960s after her performance of the song "The Girl from Ipanema".

The recordings of American jazz saxophonist Stan Getz from 1944 to 1991.

The discography of Astrud Gilberto consists of sixteen studio albums and two live albums on Verve Records, CTI Records, Perception Records, Audio Fidelity Records, Denon Records, Polygram Records, Pony Canyon and Magya Productions, as well as one music DVD on Coqueiro Verde Records.

<i>Getz Au Go Go</i> album by Stan Getz

Getz Au Go Go is a live album by American saxophonist Stan Getz and his quartet, featuring bossa nova singer Astrud Gilberto. It was recorded during two concerts in 1964 and released on Verve the same year as V6-8600.

<i>Big Band Bossa Nova</i> (Stan Getz album) 1962 studio album by Stan Getz

Big Band Bossa Nova is a 1962 album by saxophonist Stan Getz with the Gary McFarland Orchestra. The album was arranged and conducted by Gary McFarland and produced by Creed Taylor for Verve Records. This was Stan's second bossa nova album for Verve following Jazz Samba, his very successful collaboration with guitarist Charlie Byrd.

Jim Tomlinson British saxophonist

Jim Tomlinson is a British tenor saxophonist, clarinetist, flautist, producer, arranger and composer, born 9 September 1966, in Sutton Coldfield, Warwickshire, England. He is married to singer Stacey Kent.

References

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  3. 1 2 Pbs.org "Oxford University Press" PBS – Jazz – A film By Ken Burns
  4. Eric Schneider (March 11, 1952). "Moonlight in Vermont - Johnny Smith, Johnny Smith Quintet | Songs, Reviews, Credits, Awards". AllMusic . Retrieved August 18, 2015.
  5. 1 2 Murrells, Joseph (1978). The Book of Golden Discs (2nd ed.). London: Barrie and Jenkins Ltd. pp. 146–147. ISBN   0-214-20512-6.
  6. page 208 of "italic" The Latin Beat "italic" by Ed Morales
  7. "Stan Getz". NNDb.com. Retrieved August 18, 2015.
  8. "Monica Getz". Lund University Foundation. Lund University Foundation. Retrieved March 24, 2015.
  9. 1 2 3 Margolick, David (November 26, 1990). "Ex-Wife of Stan Getz Testing a Divorce Law". New York Times. Retrieved March 24, 2015.
  10. 1 2 Watrous, Peter (June 7, 1991). "Stan Getz, 64, Saxophonist, Dies; A Melodist With His Own Sound". New York Times. Retrieved March 24, 2015.
  11. 1 2 Inc, Nielsen Business Media (February 5, 2000). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc.
  12. "7th Annual GRAMMY Awards". GRAMMY.com. January 17, 2013. Retrieved April 29, 2017.
  13. Jazz, All About. "Stan Getz: Spring 1976". All About Jazz. Retrieved April 29, 2017.
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