Stanley Haynes (producer)

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Stanley Haynes
Born14 November 1906
Died1958
OccupationProducer, Writer, Director
Years active1934-1957 (film & TV)

Stanley Haynes (1906–1958) was a British film producer and screenwriter. He also directed one film, the 1946 period drama Carnival . He collaborated with David Lean at Cineguild Productions in the late 1940s. [1] He was married to the actress Rosalyn Boulter.

Contents

Selected filmography

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References

  1. Phillips p.145

Bibliography