Staples Center

Last updated
Staples Center
Staples Center Logo.svg
Staples Center 2012.jpg
USA Los Angeles Metropolitan Area location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Staples Center
Location in L.A. metro area
Relief map of California.png
Red pog.svg
Staples Center
Location in California
Usa edcp relief location map.png
Red pog.svg
Staples Center
Location in the United States
Address1111 South Figueroa Street
Location Los Angeles, California
Coordinates 34°02′35″N118°16′02″W / 34.04306°N 118.26722°W / 34.04306; -118.26722 Coordinates: 34°02′35″N118°16′02″W / 34.04306°N 118.26722°W / 34.04306; -118.26722
Public transit LAMetroLogo.svg Pico LACMTA Circle Blue Line.svg   LACMTA Circle Expo Line.svg  
OwnerL.A. Arena company
Anschutz Entertainment Group
OperatorL.A. Arena company
Anschutz Entertainment Group
Capacity Basketball: 19,060 (Clippers)
18,997 (Lakers) [1]
Ice hockey: 18,230 (Kings) [2]
Arena football: 16,096
Concerts: 19,000
Boxing/Wrestling: 21,000
Concert theatre: 8,000
Construction
Broke groundMarch 31, 1997
OpenedOctober 17, 1999
Construction costUS$375 million
($564 million in 2018 dollars [3] )
Architect Dan Meis
NBBJ
Structural engineerJohn A Martin & Associates [4]
Services engineerM-E Engineers Inc.
General contractor PCL Construction Services, Inc. [5]
Tenants
Los Angeles Kings (NHL) (1999–present)
Los Angeles Lakers (NBA) (1999–present)
Los Angeles Clippers (NBA) (1999–present)
Los Angeles Sparks (WNBA) (2001–present)
Los Angeles Avengers (AFL) (2000–2008)
Los Angeles D-Fenders (NBA D-League) (2006–2010)

Staples Center, officially stylized as STAPLES Center, is a multi-purpose arena in Downtown Los Angeles. Adjacent to the L.A. Live development, it is located next to the Los Angeles Convention Center complex along Figueroa Street. The arena opened on October 17, 1999.

Arena enclosed area designed to showcase theater, musical performances, or sporting events

An arena is an enclosed area, often circular or oval-shaped, designed to showcase theatre, musical performances, or sporting events. It is composed of a large open space surrounded on most or all sides by tiered seating for spectators, and may be covered by a roof. The key feature of an arena is that the event space is the lowest point, allowing maximum visibility. Arenas are usually designed to accommodate a large number of spectators.

Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood of Los Angeles in Los Angeles, California

Downtown Los Angeles (DTLA) is the central business district of Los Angeles, California, as well as a diverse residential neighborhood of some 58,000 people. A 2013 study found that the district is home to over 500,000 jobs. It is also part of Central Los Angeles.

L.A. Live entertainment complex in downtown Los Angeles

L.A. LIVE is an entertainment complex in the South Park District of Downtown Los Angeles, California. It is adjacent to the Staples Center and Los Angeles Convention Center.

Contents

It is owned and operated by the Arturo L.A. Arena Company and Anschutz Entertainment Group. The arena is home to the Los Angeles Kings of the National Hockey League (NHL), the Los Angeles Lakers and the Los Angeles Clippers of the National Basketball Association (NBA), and the Los Angeles Sparks of the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). The Los Angeles Avengers of the Arena Football League (AFL) and the Los Angeles D-Fenders of the NBA D-League were also tenants; the Avengers were folded in 2009, and the D-Fenders moved to the Lakers' practice facility at the Toyota Sports Center in El Segundo, California for the 2011–12 season. [6] Staples Center is also host to over 250 events and nearly 4 million guests each year. [7] It is the only arena in the NBA shared by two teams, as well as one of only two North American professional sports venues to host two teams from the same league; MetLife Stadium, the home of the National Football League's New York Giants and New York Jets, is the other. Staples Center is the venue of the Grammy Awards ceremony and will host the basketball competition during the 2028 Summer Olympics.

Anschutz Entertainment Group company

The Anschutz Entertainment Group (AEG) is an American worldwide sporting and music entertainment presenter and a subsidiary of The Anschutz Corporation. It is the world's largest owner of sports teams and sports events. Under the AEG Presents brand, it is the world's second largest presenter of live music and entertainment events after Live Nation. AEG Presents was started in 2002.

Los Angeles Kings hockey team of the National Hockey League

The Los Angeles Kings are a professional ice hockey team based in Los Angeles. They are members of the Pacific Division of the Western Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). The team was founded on June 5, 1967, after Jack Kent Cooke was awarded an NHL expansion franchise for Los Angeles on February 9, 1966, becoming one of the six teams that began play as part of the 1967 NHL expansion. The Kings played their home games at The Forum in Inglewood, California, a suburb of Los Angeles, for thirty-two years, until they moved to the Staples Center in Downtown Los Angeles at the start of the 1999–2000 season.

National Hockey League North American professional ice hockey league

The National Hockey League is a professional ice hockey league in North America, currently comprising 31 teams: 24 in the United States and 7 in Canada. The NHL is considered to be the premier professional ice hockey league in the world, and one of the major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. The Stanley Cup, the oldest professional sports trophy in North America, is awarded annually to the league playoff champion at the end of each season.

Description

Structure and architecture

Staples Center measures 950,000 square feet (88,257.9 m2) of total space, with a 94-foot (28.7 m) by 200-foot (61.0 m) arena floor. It stands 150 feet (45.7 m) tall. [6] The arena seats up to 19,067 for basketball, 18,340 for ice hockey, and around 20,000 for concerts or other sporting events. [1] [7] Two-thirds of the arena's seating, including 2,500 club seats, are in the lower bowl. There are also 160 luxury suites, including 15 event suites, on three levels between the lower and upper bowls. [6] The arena's attendance record is held by the fight between World WBA Welterweight Champion, Antonio Margarito and Shane Mosley with a crowd of 20,820 set on January 25, 2009. [8]

Basketball team sport played on a court with baskets on either end

Basketball is a team sport in which two teams, most commonly of five players each, opposing one another on a rectangular court, compete with the primary objective of shooting a basketball through the defender's hoop while preventing the opposing team from shooting through their own hoop. A field goal is worth two points, unless made from behind the three-point line, when it is worth three. After a foul, timed play stops and the player fouled or designated to shoot a technical foul is given one or more one-point free throws. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins, but if regulation play expires with the score tied, an additional period of play (overtime) is mandated.

Ice hockey team sport played on ice using sticks, skates, and a puck

Ice hockey is a contact team sport played on ice, usually in a rink, in which two teams of skaters use their sticks to shoot a vulcanized rubber puck into their opponent's net to score points. The sport is known to be fast-paced and physical, with teams usually consisting of six players each: one goaltender, and five players who skate up and down the ice trying to take the puck and score a goal against the opposing team.

Concert live performance of music

A concert is a live music performance in front of an audience. The performance may be by a single musician, sometimes then called a recital, or by a musical ensemble, such as an orchestra, choir, or band. Concerts are held in a wide variety and size of settings, from private houses and small nightclubs, dedicated concert halls, arenas and parks to large multipurpose buildings, and even sports stadiums. Indoor concerts held in the largest venues are sometimes called arena concerts or amphitheatre concerts. Informal names for a concert include show and gig.

Star Plaza

Outside the arena at the Star Plaza are statues of Wayne Gretzky and Magic Johnson, although both played at The Forum, where the Kings, Lakers and Sparks previously played. A third statue of boxer Oscar De La Hoya was unveiled outside Staples Center on December 1, 2008. [9] On April 20, 2010 a fourth statue of the late long time Lakers broadcaster Chick Hearn, behind a Laker desk with a chair for fans to sit down for a picture, was unveiled. A fifth statue of the Laker legend Jerry West dribbling was unveiled on February 17, 2011. A sixth statue of Lakers player Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was unveiled on November 16, 2012. A seventh statue of former Kings' Hall of Fame left wing Luc Robitaille was unveiled on March 7, 2015. [10] An eighth statue of Lakers center Shaquille O'Neal was unveiled on March 24, 2017. [11] On January 13, 2018 a ninth statue, of legendary Kings announcer Bob Miller, was unveiled. [12] A tenth statue of Laker legend Elgin Baylor was unveiled on April 6, 2018. [13]

Wayne Gretzky Canadian ice hockey player

Wayne Douglas Gretzky is a Canadian former professional ice hockey player and former head coach. He played 20 seasons in the National Hockey League (NHL) for four teams from 1979 to 1999. Nicknamed "The Great One", he has been called "the greatest hockey player ever" by many sportswriters, players, and the league itself. Gretzky is the leading scorer in NHL history, with more goals and assists than any other player. He garnered more assists than any other player scored total points, and is the only NHL player to total over 200 points in one season – a feat he accomplished four times. In addition, Gretzky tallied over 100 points in 16 professional seasons, 14 of them consecutive. At the time of his retirement in 1999 and persisting through 2017, he holds 61 NHL records: 40 regular season records, 15 playoff records, and six All-Star records.

Magic Johnson American basketball player

Earvin "Magic" Johnson Jr. is an American retired professional basketball player and former president of basketball operations of the Los Angeles Lakers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He played point guard for the Lakers for 13 seasons. After winning championships in high school and college, Johnson was selected first overall in the 1979 NBA draft by the Lakers. He won a championship and an NBA Finals Most Valuable Player Award in his rookie season, and won four more championships with the Lakers during the 1980s. Johnson retired abruptly in 1991 after announcing that he had contracted HIV, but returned to play in the 1992 All-Star Game, winning the All-Star MVP Award. After protests from his fellow players, he retired again for four years, but returned in 1996, at age 36, to play 32 games for the Lakers before retiring for the third and final time.

The Forum (Inglewood, California) Arena in California, United States

The Forum is a multi-purpose indoor arena in Inglewood, California, United States, adjacent to Los Angeles. Located between West Manchester Boulevard, across Pincay Drive and Kareem Court, it is north of the under-construction Los Angeles Stadium at Hollywood Park and the Hollywood Park Casino. It is about three miles east of Los Angeles International Airport (LAX). Opening on December 30, 1967, the Forum was an unusual and groundbreaking structure. Architect Charles Luckman's vision was brought to life by engineers Carl Johnson and Svend Nielsen, who were able to engineer the structure so that it had no major support pillars. This had previously been unheard of in an indoor arena the size of the Forum.

Secret tunnel

On January 15, 2018, in the aftermath of an NBA basketball game between the Houston Rockets and the Los Angeles Clippers, point guard Chris Paul made the best of playing in Staples Center for 6 years by utilizing a secret tunnel (connecting the away team's locker room to the backdoor of the Clipper's locker room) to confront former Clipper teammates Austin Rivers and Blake Griffin.The final score of the game was 102-113. He was joined with teammates such as Trevor Ariza, James Harden, and Gerald Green to confront the opponents, which only resulted in verbal altercations.

Houston Rockets American professional basketball team based in Houston, Texas

The Houston Rockets are an American professional basketball team based in Houston, Texas. The Rockets compete in the National Basketball Association (NBA) as a member of the league's Western Conference Southwest Division. The team plays its home games at the Toyota Center, located in downtown Houston. The Rockets have won two NBA championships and four Western Conference titles. The team was established in 1967 as the San Diego Rockets, an expansion team originally based in San Diego. In 1971, the Rockets moved to Houston.

Los Angeles Clippers basketball team in Los Angeles, California, United States

The Los Angeles Clippers, abbreviated by the team as the LA Clippers, are an American professional basketball team based in Los Angeles. The Clippers compete in the National Basketball Association (NBA) as a member of Pacific Division of the league's Western Conference. The Clippers play their home games at Staples Center in downtown Los Angeles, an arena shared with fellow NBA team the Los Angeles Lakers, the Los Angeles Sparks of the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA), and the Los Angeles Kings of the National Hockey League (NHL).

Chris Paul American basketball player

Christopher Emmanuel Paul is an American professional basketball player for the Houston Rockets of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He has won the NBA Rookie of the Year Award, an NBA All-Star Game Most Valuable Player Award, two Olympic gold medals, and led the NBA in assists four times and steals six times. He has also been selected to nine NBA All-Star teams, eight All-NBA teams, and nine NBA All-Defensive teams.

History

Staples Center during a Lakers game prior to the installation of the new scoreboard, and after the implementation of a new lighting system. Staples Center Lakers.jpg
Staples Center during a Lakers game prior to the installation of the new scoreboard, and after the implementation of a new lighting system.

The Staples Center has been referred to as "the deal that almost wasn't " [14] [15]

Long before construction of the Staples Center broke ground, plans for the arena were negotiated between elected city officials, and real estate developers Ed Roski of Majestic Realty and Philip Anschutz. [16] They had acquired the hockey team the Los Angeles Kings in 1995 and were in the beginning of 1996 looking for a new home for their team, which then played at the Forum in Inglewood. [17] [18]

Majestic Realty Co. in conjunction with AEG were scouring the Los Angeles area for available land to develop an arena when they were approached by Steve Soboroff, then president of LA Recreation and Parks Commission. Mr. Soboroff requested that they consider building the arena in downtown Los Angeles adjacent to the convention center. The proposal intrigued Roski and Anschutz and soon a plan to develop the arena, the current Staples Center, was devised. [16]

Months of negotiations ensued between Philip Anschutz and city officials with Ed Roski and John Semcken of Majestic Realty Co. spearheading the negotiations for the real estate developers. The negotiations grew contentious at times and the real estate developers threatened to pull out altogether on more than one occasion. [16] The main opposition came from Councilman Joel Wachs, opposed utilizing public funds to subsidizing the proposed project [15] [19] and councilwoman Rita Walters, who objected parts of it. [20]

Ultimately, the developers and city leaders reached an agreement and in 1997, construction broke ground and Staples Center opened a year later. It was financed privately at a cost of US$375 million and is named for the office-supply company Staples, Inc., which was one of the center's corporate sponsors that paid for naming rights. [6] The arena opened on October 17, 1999, with a Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band concert as its inaugural event.

On October 21, 2009, Staples Center celebrated its 10th anniversary. [21] To commemorate the occasion, the venue's official web site nominated 25 of the arena's greatest moments from its first ten years with fans voting on the top ten. [22] [23]

During the late summer of 2010, modifications were made to the arena, including refurbished locker rooms for the Clippers, Kings, and Lakers and the installation of a new high-definition center-hung video scoreboard, replacing the original one that had been in place since the building opened in 1998. [24] The Panasonic Live 4HD scoreboard was officially unveiled on September 22, as AEG and Staples Center executives, as well as player representatives from the Clippers (Craig Smith), Kings (Matt Greene), and Lakers (Sasha Vujacic) were on hand for the presentation.

Events

Music

After his death in 2009, Michael Jackson's memorial service was held at Staples Center. [25]

Musician Nipsey Hussle's memorial service was also held at Staples Center, on April 11th, 2019.

Staples Center also hosted the 1st Annual Latin Grammy Awards in 2000 and the 2012 MTV Video Music Awards.

Grammy Awards

The annual Grammy Awards ceremony have been held at Staples Center since 2000, with the exception of 2003 and 2018. As of 2019, the venue has hosted the Grammy Awards eighteen times, hosting more than any other venue.

Sports

The venue opened in 1999 as the home of the Los Angeles Lakers and Los Angeles Clippers (NBA), and Los Angeles Kings of the NHL. The Los Angeles Sparks of the WNBA joined in 2001, while the Los Angeles D-Fenders of the NBA D-League joined in 2006. It became home to the Los Angeles Avengers of the Arena Football League in 2000 until the team's discontinuation in 2009. [26]

Since its opening day, the Staples Center has hosted seven NBA Finals series with the Lakers, the 2012 and 2014 Stanley Cup Finals, three WNBA Finals, the 2002 U.S. Figure Skating Championships, the 52nd and 62nd NHL All-Star game, three NBA All-Star Games (2004, 2011 and 2018), the Pacific-10 Conference Men's Basketball Tournament (from 2002–12), the WTA Tour Championships (from 2002–05), UFC 60 in 2006, UFC 104 in 2009, UFC 184 in 2015, UFC 227 in 2018, the 2009 World Figure Skating Championships, the Summer X Games indoor competitions (from 2003–13), and several HBO Championship Boxing matches. [7] [27]

Staples Center before a Clippers game, featuring the new hanging scoreboard ClippersStaples.JPG
Staples Center before a Clippers game, featuring the new hanging scoreboard

On January 22, 2006, Los Angeles Lakers player Kobe Bryant scored a career-high 81 points in the Staples Center against the Toronto Raptors, the second-highest number of points scored in a single game in NBA history, [28] second only to Wilt Chamberlain's 100-point performance. Of the team's five NBA championships since moving to the venue, the Lakers have celebrated their 2000 and 2010 victories at Staples Center with series-winning victories at home.[ citation needed ]

Prior to the 2006–07 NBA season, the lighting inside Staples Center was modified for Lakers games. The lights were focused only on the court itself (hence the promotional Lights Out campaign), reminiscent of the Lakers' early years at The Forum. Initial fan reaction was positive, and has been a fixture on home games since. [29] The Daktronics see-through shot-clock was first installed prior to the 2008–09 NBA season.[ citation needed ] The Clippers adopted the new see through shot clock prior to the 2010–11 NBA season.[ citation needed ] For Sparks games, the court used is named after Sparks player Lisa Leslie, and was officially named prior to the 2009 home opener against the Shock on June 6, 2009.[ citation needed ]

The Los Angeles Kings, of the NHL hosted the 2010 NHL Entry Draft at the arena in June 2010. The Stanley Cup Finals were held at the arena for the first time in 2012. The Kings hosted the New Jersey Devils in games 3, 4, and ultimately defeated the Devils in game 6 by a final score of 6-1. The Kings became the first team to win the Stanley Cup on home ice since 2007.

During the spring of 2012, NHL's Kings, along with NBA's Lakers and Clippers reached the post-season, making it the first time the arena would host three playoff teams. [30]

The Lakers unveiled a new hardwood court before their preseason game on October 13, 2012. Taking a cue from soccer clubs, the primary center court logo was adorned with 16 stars, representing the 16 championships the Lakers franchise has won.[ citation needed ]

Staples Center has hosted the following championship events:

The January 24, 2000 Episode of WCW Monday Nitro was held in the Staples Center.

In 2013 and 2016, Staples Center hosted the grand finals of the Worlds Championship of the video game League of Legends. [32]

On September 24, 2016, the arena hosted the Kellogg's Tour of Gymnastics Champions. [33]

On February 22-23, 2019, the Professional Bull Riders will bring their annual "Iron Cowboy" bull riding elite series Unleash the Beast event to Staples Center in what will be the PBR's first-ever visit to the venue. [34]

Night view of Staples Center and L.A. Live Staples Center LA Live.jpg
Night view of Staples Center and L.A. Live

2028 Summer Olympics

Staples Center will host the basketball competition at the 2028 Summer Olympics. It will host men's preliminaries as well as the men's and women's basketball finals.[ citation needed ] [35]

Other events

The 2000 Democratic National Convention was held at Staples Center. [36]

Awards and recognitions

Staples Center was named Best w Major Concert Venue for 1998 and Arena of the Year for 1999, 2000 and 2001 by Pollstar Magazine and has been nominated each year since 2000. [7]

In February 2013, PETA named Staples Center the most "vegetarian-friendly" arena in the NBA. [37]

L.A. Live

Staples Center is only a part of a 4,000,000-square-foot (371,612.2 m2) development by Anschutz Entertainment Group (AEG) adjoining Staples Center and the Los Angeles Convention Center. The development, known as L.A. Live, broke ground on September 15, 2005. L.A. Live is designed to offer entertainment, retail and residential programming in the downtown Los Angeles area. [38] [39]

See also

Related Research Articles

Elgin Baylor American basketball player, coach, executive

Elgin Gay Baylor is an American former basketball player, coach, and executive. He played 14 seasons as a small forward in the National Basketball Association (NBA) for the Minneapolis / Los Angeles Lakers, appearing in eight NBA Finals. Baylor was a gifted shooter, strong rebounder, and an accomplished passer. Renowned for his acrobatic maneuvers on the court, Baylor regularly dazzled Lakers fans with his trademark hanging jump shots. The No. 1 draft pick in 1958, NBA Rookie of the Year in 1959, 11-time NBA All-Star, and a 10-time member of the All-NBA first team, he is regarded as one of the game's all-time greatest players. In 1977, Baylor was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.

Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena Former arena in California, United States

The Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena was a multi-purpose arena at Exposition Park, in the University Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. It was located next to the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum and just south of the campus of the University of Southern California, which managed and operated both venues under a master lease agreement with the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Commission. The arena was demolished in 2016 and replaced with Banc of California Stadium, home of Major League Soccer's Los Angeles FC which opened in 2018.

Stan Sheriff Center Arena in Hawaii, United States

The Stan Sheriff Center is a 10,300-seat multi-purpose arena in Honolulu CDP, City and County of Honolulu, Hawaii, on the campus of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Initially named the Special Events Arena when it opened in 1994, the arena was renamed in 1998 after Stan Sheriff (1932–1993), a former UH athletic director who lobbied for its construction.

Anaheim Convention Center Arena in California, United States

The Anaheim Convention Center is a major convention center in Anaheim, California. It is located across from the Disneyland Resort on Katella Avenue. The original components, designed by Adrian Wilson & Associates, opened in July 1967—including a basketball arena followed shortly by the convention hall. It holds many events, like VidCon, BlizzCon, Anime Expo, D23 expo, WonderCon, NAMM Show, competitions, and more. In addition to hosting various types of conventions, the Anaheim Convention Center was used to host the wrestling during the 1984 Summer Olympics.

The 1991–92 NBA season was the 46th season of the National Basketball Association. The season ended with the Chicago Bulls winning their second-straight NBA Championship, beating the Portland Trail Blazers 4 games to 2 in the NBA Finals.

2000 NBA Finals 2000 basketball championship series

The 2000 NBA Finals was the championship round of the National Basketball Association (NBA)'s 1999–2000 season, and the conclusion of the season's playoffs. The Western Conference champion Los Angeles Lakers defeated the Eastern Conference champion Indiana Pacers 4 games to 2. Lakers center Shaquille O'Neal was named the NBA Finals Most Valuable Player (MVP) of the series, his first of three consecutive honors. The series was played under a best-of-seven format, with the Lakers holding home court advantage. Until 2008, this was the most recent NBA Finals where both number one seeds from both conferences faced off in the finals.

Citizens Business Bank Arena Arena in California, United States

Citizens Business Bank Arena is a multi-purpose arena in Ontario, California, USA. It hosts local sporting events and concerts. Construction officially began on March 7, 2007, and the arena was opened on October 18, 2008. It is suitable for indoor events, including basketball, ice hockey, ice shows, boxing, graduation ceremonies and concerts. The arena's basketball capacity is 10,832. It also seats 9,736 for hockey and its full capacity is 11,089. The 225,000-square-foot (20,900 m2) venue also has 36 luxury suites on two levels. It is the biggest and most modern arena within the Inland Empire region of California.

Toyota Sports Center building in California, United States

The Toyota Sports Center is a practice facility for the Los Angeles Kings, and the Los Angeles Sparks, located on 555 North Nash Street in El Segundo, California. The $24 million, 135,000 square feet (12,500 m2) facility broke ground on April 28, 1999 and officially opened on March 5, 2000.

Fox Sports West and Prime Ticket

Fox Sports West and Prime Ticket are American regional sports networks owned by The Walt Disney Company, and operate as Fox Sports Networks affiliates. The channels broadcast regional coverage of professional and collegiate sports events in California, focusing primarily on professional sports teams based in the Greater Los Angeles area. Fox Sports West and Prime Ticket maintain general offices and studios based at the Staples Center in Downtown Los Angeles.

Los Angeles bid for the 2016 Summer Olympics

The Los Angeles 2016 Olympic bid is a reference to the unsuccessful attempt by the city of Los Angeles, with help from the Greater Los Angeles area, to be chosen by the United States Olympic Committee as the official United States bid for the International Olympic Committee 2016 Summer Olympics host city competition. On July 26, 2006, the USOC had narrowed its list of candidates to Chicago, Los Angeles and San Francisco. San Francisco later withdrew its bid on November 13, 2006. On April 14, 2007, Chicago was selected as the United States bid. Two years later, Chicago lost their bid to Rio de Janeiro when the IOC voted to select the host city.

Sports in Los Angeles sports in Los Angeles

The Los Angeles metropolitan area is home to several professional and collegiate sports teams. The Greater Los Angeles Area has eleven major league professional teams: the Anaheim Ducks, the Los Angeles Angels, the Los Angeles Chargers, the Los Angeles Clippers, the Los Angeles Dodgers, Los Angeles FC, LA Galaxy, the Los Angeles Kings, the Los Angeles Lakers, Los Angeles Sparks, and the Los Angeles Rams. USC Trojans football, UCLA Bruins men's basketball, USC Trojans baseball, USC Trojans track & field, and Cal State Fullerton Titans baseball are all historically premier organizations in college sports. Other major sports teams include UCLA Bruins Football, Pepperdine Waves baseball, and formerly the Los Angeles Raiders and Los Angeles Aztecs. Between them, these Los Angeles area sports teams have won a combined 105 Championship Titles. Los Angeles area colleges have produced upwards of 200 National Championship Teams, primarily from USC Trojans and UCLA Bruins of the Pac-12 Conference. The 1932 and 1984 Summer Olympics were held in Los Angeles. In 2028 the city will host the Olympics for a third time.

Madison Square Garden Company company

The Madison Square Garden Company is an American sports and entertainment holding company based in New York City.

Venues of the 1984 Summer Olympics

For the 1984 Summer Olympics, a total of thirty-one venues were used. Two venues from the 1932 Summer Olympics, the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum and the Rose Bowl, were used for these Games. Between the 1932 and the 1984 Summer Olympics, the expansion of professional sports teams assisted in the growth of the facilities that would be used for the 1984 events. Only two new permanent venues were constructed, both using corporate sponsorship though neither were mentioned in the official Olympic report. Many of the other venues had temporary adjustments and returned to their normal usage once the 1984 Olympics were completed. Stanford Stadium in Palo Alto and the Rose Bowl later served as venues for the Super Bowl, the FIFA World Cup, and the FIFA Women's World Cup. The velodrome that was constructed for the 1984 Games was demolished in 2003.

Lakers–Clippers rivalry National Basketball Association cross-town rivalry in Los Angeles

The Lakers–Clippers rivalry is a National Basketball Association (NBA) rivalry between the Los Angeles Lakers and Los Angeles Clippers. The two Pacific Division teams both play their home games at Staples Center in Los Angeles, inspiring their matchups to sometimes be called the "Hallway Series". The Lakers relocated from Minneapolis in 1960, while the Clippers moved from San Diego in 1984. While Los Angeles fans have historically favored the Lakers, the Clippers have sold out every home game at Staples Center since Feb. 2011 and entered the 2016–17 season with the sixth-longest active sellout streak in the NBA. The Lakers have won 11 of their 16 NBA championships since moving to Los Angeles. Meanwhile, the Clippers have made the playoffs only nine times since 1984 and were long considered the laughingstock of the NBA; in the history of the franchise, they have never advanced past the second round of the playoffs. Some contended that the term rivalry was inaccurate until the Clippers became more successful. The Clippers won the season series against the Lakers in 2012–13. Through the 2017–18 season, the Clippers have won six straight season series. The Lakers hold a 101–52 advantage in the all-time series. The two teams have never met in the playoffs, but came close in doing so in 2006.

The expansion of the National Basketball Association has happened several times in the league's history since it began play in 1946. Some of the most recent examples of the expansion of the NBA are the Charlotte Hornets in 1988, Miami Heat in 1989, Vancouver Grizzlies in 1995, and New Orleans Pelicans in 2002.

Inglewood Basketball and Entertainment Center

The Inglewood Basketball and Entertainment Center is a proposed 18,000 seat arena to be located in Inglewood, California for the Los Angeles Clippers of the National Basketball Association.

References

  1. 1 2 "Guest Services: Seating Capacity". Staples Center. Retrieved March 24, 2014.
  2. Kalinowski, Mike; Fischerman, Eddie; Moeller, Jeff; Altieri, MIchael; Nickson, Nick (2014). LA Kings 2014-15 Media Guide. Los Angeles Kings. p. 327.
  3. Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis Community Development Project. "Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–". Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Retrieved January 2, 2019.
  4. JAMA – Sports & Recreation Archived 2011-07-12 at the Wayback Machine
  5. Staples Center – Basketball – Ballparks.com
  6. 1 2 3 4 "L.A. Facilities: Staples Center". Los Angeles Sports Council. Retrieved January 1, 2008.
  7. 1 2 3 4 "AEG Staples Center" (Press release). AEG Worldwide. Archived from the original on August 28, 2008. Retrieved January 1, 2008.
  8. Dwyre, Bill (January 25, 2009). "Shane Mosley Shows He's Not Finished". Los Angeles Times . Retrieved January 25, 2009.
  9. Plaschke, Bill (December 2, 2008). "Oscar De La Hoya Gets A Statue Of Limitations". Los Angeles Times . Retrieved December 2, 2008.
  10. Zupke, Curtis (March 7, 2015). "Robitaille Honored To Have Statue Unveiled". National Hockey League. Retrieved March 8, 2015.
  11. "Lakers to honor Shaq with statue outside Staples". ESPN.com. Retrieved 2017-12-10.
  12. https://www.dailynews.com/2018/01/13/bob-miller-statue-at-staples-center-is-dreamy-stuff/
  13. "Lakers Unveil Elgin Baylor Statue Outside of STAPLES Center | Los Angeles Lakers". Los Angeles Lakers. Retrieved 2018-04-07.
  14. "History of AEG: The deal that almost wasn't". Daily News. 2012-09-22. Retrieved 2017-11-16.
  15. 1 2 Mandell, Jason. "The Staples Center Score". Los Angeles Downtown News - The Voice of Downtown Los Angeles. Retrieved 2017-11-16.
  16. 1 2 3 WHARTON, DAVID; NORWOOD, ROBYN (1999-10-10). "Six Who Made It Happen". Los Angeles Times. ISSN   0458-3035 . Retrieved 2017-11-16.
  17. MERL, JEAN. "Council Expected to Be Given Plan for Arena Ticket Levy". Los Angeles Times. ISSN   0458-3035 . Retrieved 2017-11-16.
  18. "Staples becomes a beacon for urban renewal". www.sportsbusinessdaily.com. Retrieved 2017-11-16.
  19. ROHRLICH, TED (1997-08-28). "Arena Developers Adopt a Strategy of Disclosure". Los Angeles Times. ISSN   0458-3035 . Retrieved 2017-11-16.
  20. MERL, JEAN (1997-01-16). "Council Endorses Deal to Build Sports Arena". Los Angeles Times. ISSN   0458-3035 . Retrieved 2017-11-16.
  21. Howard, Andrew (October 21, 2009). "Happy Birthday STAPLES Center". Los Angeles Kings. Retrieved October 26, 2009.
  22. "Staples Center Announces the Top 25 Greatest Moments as Nominated by the Fans". staplescenter.com. February 3, 2010. Archived from the original on June 17, 2013. Retrieved February 3, 2010.
  23. "Staples Center Announces the 10 Greatest Moments". staplescenter.com. April 15, 2010. Archived from the original on December 13, 2012. Retrieved April 15, 2010.
  24. "Staples Center unveils Live 4HD scoreboard system by Panasonic". staplescenter.com. September 22, 2010. Archived from the original on November 28, 2010. Retrieved October 18, 2010.
  25. TVGuideNews (July 7, 2009). "Top Moments: Michael Jackson Memorial". TVGuide.com. Retrieved June 22, 2018.
  26. "About Staples Center" (Press release). AEG Worldwide. Retrieved January 1, 2008.
  27. "Staples Center: 10 years of boxing and counting". ringtv.com. Retrieved January 28, 2018.
  28. NBA Staff (January 22, 2006). Watch All of Kobe's 81 Points in 3 Minutes. NBA.
  29. "Leading Off: Lakers 'Lights Out' Puts the Light back on the Court". www.sportsshooter.com. Retrieved 2017-06-27.
  30. Woike, Dan (2012-04-23). "Three playoff teams a 'windfall' for busy Staples Center". The Orange County Register. Retrieved 2013-08-11.
  31. Matsuda, Gann (2012-06-12). "Los Angeles Kings Win 2012 Stanley Cup, Turning Dreams Into Reality, The Unthinkable Into Fact" . Retrieved 2013-08-11.
  32. http://www.lolesports.com/en_US/articles/2016-world-championship-hits-north-america
  33. "2016 Kellogg's Tour of Gymnastics Champions takes center stage beginning Sept. 15". usagym.org. Retrieved March 26, 2019.
  34. Professional Bull Riders - PBR's Iron Cowboy moves to Los Angeles in 2019
  35. https://la28.org/assets/pdf/LA2024-candidature-part3_english.pdf
  36. https://web.archive.org/web/20000803200306/http://dems2000.com:80/index2.html
  37. "STAPLES Center Named Top Veggie-Friendly NBA Arena". CBS Los Angeles. 2013-02-13. Retrieved 2013-08-11.
  38. "AEG L.A. Live" (Press release). AEG Worldwide. Archived from the original on December 22, 2007. Retrieved January 1, 2008.
  39. "L.A. Live timeline" (Press release). AEG Worldwide. Archived from the original on July 23, 2008. Retrieved January 1, 2008.
Events and tenants
Preceded by
Great Western Forum
Home of the
Los Angeles Lakers

1999 – present
Succeeded by
current
Preceded by
Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena
Home of the
Los Angeles Clippers

1999 – present
Succeeded by
current
Preceded by
Great Western Forum
Home of the
Los Angeles Kings

1999 – present
Succeeded by
current
Preceded by
first arena
Home of the
Los Angeles Avengers

2000 – 2008
Succeeded by
current
Preceded by
Great Western Forum
Home of the
Los Angeles Sparks

2001 – present
Succeeded by
current
Preceded by
Pepsi Center
Bridgestone Arena
Venues of the
NHL All-Star Game

2002
2017
Succeeded by
Office Depot Center
Amalie Arena
Preceded by
Olympiahalle
WTA Tour Championships
venues

2002 – 2005
Succeeded by
Madrid Arena
Preceded by
Philips Arena
Cowboys Stadium
Venues of the
NBA All-Star Game

2004
2011
Succeeded by
Pepsi Center
Amway Center
Preceded by
Nokia Theatre
Venues of the
MTV Video Music Awards

2012
Succeeded by
Barclays Center
Preceded by
Conseco Fieldhouse
Permanent Venue of WWE SummerSlam
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Succeeded by
Barclays Center
Preceded by
Mercedes-Benz Arena
Berlin
League of Legends World Championship
Final Venue

2016
Succeeded by
Beijing National Stadium
Beijing