Stark, New Hampshire

Last updated
Stark, New Hampshire
Town
Center of Stark, New Hampshire.jpg
Coos-Stark-NH.png
Coordinates: 44°36′05″N71°24′33″W / 44.60139°N 71.40917°W / 44.60139; -71.40917 Coordinates: 44°36′05″N71°24′33″W / 44.60139°N 71.40917°W / 44.60139; -71.40917
Country United States
State New Hampshire
County Coos
Incorporated 1795
VillagesStark
Crystal
Percy
Government
   Board of Selectmen Albert Cloutier, Jr., Chair
Colin Wentworth
Douglas Shannon
Area
  Total 59.6 sq mi (154.3 km2)
  Land58.7 sq mi (152.0 km2)
  Water0.9 sq mi (2.4 km2)  1.52%
Elevation
964 ft (294 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total556
  Density9.3/sq mi (3.6/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC-4 (Eastern)
ZIP code
03582
Area code(s) 603
FIPS code 33-73060
GNIS feature ID0873724
Website townofstark.com

Stark is a town in Coos County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 556 at the 2010 census. [1] It has a famous covered bridge. The town includes the villages of Percy and Crystal as well as the village of Stark, located on the Upper Ammonoosuc River. New Hampshire Route 110 runs through Stark, east from U.S. Highway 3 in Groveton and northwest from Route 16 in Berlin. Much of the town is within the boundaries of the White Mountain National Forest.

New England town Basic unit of local government in each of the six New England federated states of the United States

The New England town, generally referred to simply as a town in New England, is the basic unit of local government and local division of state authority in each of the six New England states and without a direct counterpart in most other U.S. states. New England towns overlay the entire area of a state, similar to civil townships in other states where they exist, but they are fully functioning municipal corporations, possessing powers similar to cities in other states. New Jersey's system of equally powerful townships, boroughs, towns, and cities is the system which is most similar to that of New England. New England towns are often governed by a town meeting legislative body. The great majority of municipal corporations in New England are based on the town model; statutory forms based on the concept of a compact populated place are uncommon, though they are prevalent elsewhere in the U.S. County government in New England states is typically weak at best, and in some states nonexistent. Connecticut, for example, has no county governments, nor does Rhode Island. Both of those states retain counties only as geographic subdivisions with no governmental authority, while Massachusetts has abolished eight of fourteen county governments so far. With few exceptions, counties serve mostly as dividing lines for the states' judicial systems.

New Hampshire State of the United States of America

New Hampshire is a state in the New England region of the northeastern United States. It is bordered by Massachusetts to the south, Vermont to the west, Maine and the Atlantic Ocean to the east, and the Canadian province of Quebec to the north. New Hampshire is the 5th smallest by area and the 10th least populous of the 50 states. Concord is the state capital, while Manchester is the largest city in the state. It has no general sales tax, nor is personal income taxed at either the state or local level. The New Hampshire primary is the first primary in the U.S. presidential election cycle. Its license plates carry the state motto, "Live Free or Die". The state's nickname, "The Granite State", refers to its extensive granite formations and quarries.

Upper Ammonoosuc River river in the United States of America

The Upper Ammonoosuc River is a tributary of the Connecticut River that flows through Coös County in northern part of the northeastern U.S. state of New Hampshire. Despite its name, the river is not an upstream portion of the Ammonoosuc River, but instead a separate tributary of the Connecticut River flowing from 20 to 60 miles to the north of the Ammonoosuc.

Contents

Stark is part of the Berlin, NH VT Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Berlin, New Hampshire City in New Hampshire, United States

Berlin is a city along the Androscoggin River in Coös County in northern New Hampshire, United States. It is the northernmost city in New Hampshire. The population was 10,051 at the 2010 census. As of July 1, 2017, the estimated population was 10,225. It includes the village of Cascade in the south part of the city. Located in New Hampshire's Great North Woods Region or "North Country", Berlin sits at the edge of the White Mountains, and the city's boundaries extend into the White Mountain National Forest. Berlin is home to the Berlin and Coos County Historical Society's Moffett House Museum & Genealogy Center, Service Credit Union Heritage Park, the Berlin Fish Hatchery, and the White Mountains Community College, member of the Community College System of New Hampshire.

Vermont State of the United States of America

Vermont is a state in the New England region of the northeastern United States. It borders the U.S. states of Massachusetts to the south, New Hampshire to the east, New York to the west, and the Canadian province of Quebec to the north. Vermont is the second-smallest by population and the sixth-smallest by area of the 50 U.S. states. The state capital is Montpelier, the least populous state capital in the United States. The most populous city, Burlington, is the least populous city to be the most populous city in a state. As of 2015, Vermont was the leading producer of maple syrup in the United States. In crime statistics, it was ranked since 2016 as the safest state in the country.

History

General John Stark General John Stark.GIF
General John Stark

Granted in 1774, Stark was originally named Percy, after Hugh Percy, 1st Duke of Northumberland. The town was incorporated in 1795, and renamed Stark in 1832, after General John Stark, author of New Hampshire's motto, "Live Free or Die".[ citation needed ]

Hugh Percy, 1st Duke of Northumberland English peer, landowner, and art patron

Hugh Percy, 1st Duke of Northumberland,, was an English peer, landowner, and art patron.

John Stark American Revolutionary War general from New Hampshire

John Stark was a New Hampshire native who served as an officer in the British Army during the French and Indian war and a major general in the Continental Army during the American Revolution. He became widely known as the "Hero of Bennington" for his exemplary service at the Battle of Bennington in 1777.

World War II POW camp

In early 1944, the remains of a former Civilian Conservation Corps camp in the town were converted to form Camp Stark, which would hold about 250 German POWs. This was the only World War II POW camp located in New Hampshire. Most of the men in the camp performed hard labor in the nearby forests, supplying wood for the paper mills in Berlin, New Hampshire. Some of the men eventually came back to live in the United States and Canada after the war ended, and the camp was closed in 1946.

Civilian Conservation Corps public work relief program

The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was a voluntary public work relief program that operated from 1933 to 1942 in the United States for unemployed, unmarried men. Originally for young men ages 18–25, it was eventually expanded to ages 17–28. Robert Fechner was the first director of this agency, succeeded by James McEntee following Fechner's death. The CCC was a major part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal that provided unskilled manual labor jobs related to the conservation and development of natural resources in rural lands owned by federal, state, and local governments. The CCC was designed to provide jobs for young men and to relieve families who had difficulty finding jobs during the Great Depression in the United States. Maximum enrollment at any one time was 300,000. Through the course of its nine years in operation, 3 million young men participated in the CCC, which provided them with shelter, clothing, and food, together with a wage of $30 per month.

World War II 1939–1945 global war

World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. A state of total war emerged, directly involving more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. The major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease, and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.

Canada Country in North America

Canada is a country in the northern part of North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering 9.98 million square kilometres, making it the world's second-largest country by total area. Canada's southern border with the United States, stretching some 8,891 kilometres (5,525 mi), is the world's longest bi-national land border. Its capital is Ottawa, and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver. As a whole, Canada is sparsely populated, the majority of its land area being dominated by forest and tundra. Consequently, its population is highly urbanized, with over 80 percent of its inhabitants concentrated in large and medium-sized cities, with 70% of citizens residing within 100 kilometres (62 mi) of the southern border. Canada's climate varies widely across its vast area, ranging from arctic weather in the north, to hot summers in the southern regions, with four distinct seasons.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 59.6 square miles (154 km2), of which 58.7 square miles (152 km2) is land and 0.9 square miles (2.3 km2) is water, comprising 1.52% of the town. [2] The town includes the eastern edge of the Pilot Range in the White Mountains, including several peaks higher than 3,000 feet (910 m) above sea level. The highest point in Stark is 3,730-foot (1,140 m) Mount Hutchins, on the border with Northumberland.

United States Census Bureau Bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

The Pilot Range is located in the White Mountains of New Hampshire in the United States. The Pilot Range extends southeast-northwest about 15 miles (24 km). The highest peak in the range is Mount Cabot, with an elevation of 4,160 feet (1,270 m).

White Mountains (New Hampshire) mountain range in New England, United States

The White Mountains are a mountain range covering about a quarter of the state of New Hampshire and a small portion of western Maine in the United States. They are part of the northern Appalachian Mountains and the most rugged mountains in New England. The range is heavily visited due to its proximity to Boston and, to a lesser extent, New York City and Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1840 349
1850 41819.8%
1860 4261.9%
1870 4648.9%
1880 69048.7%
1890 7031.9%
1900 7334.3%
1910 448−38.9%
1920 339−24.3%
1930 329−2.9%
1940 3527.0%
1950 3736.0%
1960 327−12.3%
1970 3434.9%
1980 47037.0%
1990 51810.2%
2000 516−0.4%
2010 5567.8%
Est. 2017500 [3] −10.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [4]

As of the census [5] of 2000, there were 516 people, 194 households, and 147 families residing in the town. The population density was 8.7 people per square mile (3.4/km²). There were 384 housing units at an average density of 6.5 per square mile (2.5/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 97.48% White, 1.36% Asian, 0.19% from other races, and 0.97% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.39% of the population.

Census Acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population

A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. This term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include agriculture, business, and traffic censuses. The United Nations defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every 10 years. United Nations recommendations also cover census topics to be collected, official definitions, classifications and other useful information to co-ordinate international practice.

Population density A measurement of population numbers per unit area or volume

Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and most of the time to humans. It is a key geographical term. In simple terms population density refers to the number of people living in an area per kilometer square.

There were 194 households out of which 33.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.3% were married couples living together, 6.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.2% were non-families. 17.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 2.99.

In the town, the population was spread out with 26.6% under the age of 18, 5.8% from 18 to 24, 28.5% from 25 to 44, 26.2% from 45 to 64, and 13.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.5 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $37,946, and the median income for a family was $40,089. Males had a median income of $35,833 versus $24,750 for females. The per capita income for the town was $17,168. About 2.5% of families and 5.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including none of those under age 18 and 6.2% of those age 65 or over.

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References

  1. United States Census Bureau, American FactFinder, 2010 Census figures. Retrieved March 23, 2011.
  2. "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001) - Stark town, New Hampshire". U.S. Census Bureau American Factfinder. Retrieved November 9, 2011.
  3. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2017 (PEPANNRES): Minor Civil Divisions – New Hampshire" . Retrieved November 14, 2018.
  4. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2016.
  5. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.

Further reading