Statue of Emmeline Pankhurst

Last updated
Rise Up Women
Statue of Emmeline Pankhurst - December 2018 (3).jpg
Artist Hazel Reeves
Year2018
Type Bronze
Location Manchester, M2 3AE
United Kingdom
Coordinates 53°28′40″N2°14′35″W / 53.47778°N 2.24306°W / 53.47778; -2.24306 Coordinates: 53°28′40″N2°14′35″W / 53.47778°N 2.24306°W / 53.47778; -2.24306

The statue of Emmeline Pankhurst (officially called Rise Up Women [1] ) is a bronze sculpture in St Peter's Square, Manchester, depicting Emmeline Pankhurst, a British political activist and leader of the suffragette movement in the United Kingdom.

St Peters Square, Manchester

St Peter's Square is a public square in Manchester city centre, England. The north of the square is bounded by Princess Street and the south by Peter Street. To the west of the square is Manchester Central Library, Midland Hotel and Manchester Town Hall Extension. The square is home to the Manchester Cenotaph, the Emmeline Pankhurst statue, and St Peter's Square Metrolink tram stop and incorporates the Peace Garden. In 1819, the area around the square was the site of the Peterloo Massacre.

Emmeline Pankhurst 19th and 20th-century English suffragette

Emmeline Pankhurst was a British political activist and helper of the British suffragette movement who helped women win the right to vote. In 1999 Time named Pankhurst as one of the 100 Most Important People of the 20th Century, stating "she shaped an idea of women for our time; she shook society into a new pattern from which there could be no going back". She was widely criticised for her militant tactics, and historians disagree about their effectiveness, but her work is recognised as a crucial element in achieving women's suffrage in the United Kingdom.

Suffragette member of the Womans Social and Political Union who advocated for womens right to vote

A suffragette was a member of militant women's organisations in the early 20th century who, under the banner "Votes for Women", fought for the right to vote in public elections, known as women's suffrage. The term refers in particular to members of the British Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU), a women-only movement founded in 1903 by Emmeline Pankhurst, which engaged in direct action and civil disobedience. In 1906 a reporter writing in the Daily Mail coined the term suffragette for the WSPU, from suffragist, in an attempt to belittle the women advocating women's suffrage. The militants embraced the new name, even adopting it for use as the title of the newspaper published by the WSPU.

The statue was unveiled on 14 December 2018, the centenary of the 1918 United Kingdom general election, the first election in the United Kingdom in which women over the age of 30 could vote. [2] It is the first statue honouring a woman erected in Manchester since a statue of Queen Victoria was dedicated more than 100 years ago. [3] [4]

1918 United Kingdom general election

The 1918 United Kingdom general election was called immediately after the Armistice with Germany which ended the First World War, and was held on Saturday, 14 December 1918. The governing coalition, under Prime Minister David Lloyd George, sent letters of endorsement to candidates who supported the coalition government. These were nicknamed "Coalition Coupons", and led to the election being known as the "coupon election". The result was a massive landslide in favour of the coalition, comprising primarily the Conservatives and Coalition Liberals, with massive losses for Liberals who were not endorsed. Nearly all the Liberal M.P.s without coupons were defeated, although party leader H.H. Asquith managed to return to Parliament in a by-election.

Queen Victoria British monarch who reigned 1837–1901

Victoria was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death. On 1 May 1876, she adopted the additional title of Empress of India.

See also

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References

  1. "Our Emmeline – my statue by Hazel Reeves". Hazel Reeves.
  2. "Suffragette statues mark 100 years of women's first vote". BBC News. 14 December 2018. Retrieved 14 December 2018.
  3. "Suffragette Emmeline Pankhurst to get Manchester statue". BBC News. 20 January 2016. Retrieved 20 January 2016.
  4. Britton, Paul (2018-12-14). "Hundreds expected to join march as statue of suffragette leader Emmeline Pankhurst unveiled in Manchester". Manchester Evening News. Retrieved 2018-12-14.