Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Pop Conference 2017 - Stephen Thomas Erlewine 01.jpg
Erlewine in 2017
Born (1973-06-18) June 18, 1973 (age 48)
Other namesTom Erlewine
Alma mater University of Michigan
Occupation Music critic
Employer AllMusic, freelancer
Spouse(s)Stephanie Erlewine (m. 2017)
Relatives Michael Erlewine (uncle)

Stephen Thomas Erlewine ( /ˈɜːrlwn/ ; born June 18, 1973) is an American music critic and senior editor for the online music database AllMusic. He is the author of many artist biographies and record reviews for AllMusic, as well as a freelance writer, occasionally contributing liner notes. [1] [2]

Erlewine was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and is a nephew of the former musician and AllMusic founder Michael Erlewine. [3] [4] He studied at the University of Michigan, where he majored in English, and was a music editor (1993–94) and then arts editor (1994–1995) of the school's paper The Michigan Daily , and DJ'd at the campus radio station, WCBN. [5] He has contributed to a number of books, including All Music Guide to Rock: The Definitive Guide to Rock, Pop, and Soul [6] and All Music Guide to Hip-Hop: The Definitive Guide to Rap & Hip-Hop. [7]

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References

  1. Credits for Stephen Thomas Erlewine at AllMusic . Retrieved June 14, 2015.
  2. Walters, John (June 17, 2003). "All About the Music: Web Site a Treasure Trove of Reviews, Bios". Redeye. The Chicago Tribune. p. 28.
  3. Jenkins, Terry. Biography of Michael Erlewine at AllMusic . Retrieved 2012-05-11.
  4. Smith, Ernie (September 24, 2016). "The Story of AllMusic, the Internet's Largest, Most Influential Music Database". Vice. Vice Media Group. Retrieved June 6, 2021. By the way, Stephen is related to Michael Erlewine—his nephew, to be exact.
  5. Walters, John (July 7, 2003). "Guide Editor: All Music, All the Time". The Hartford Courant. p. D4.
  6. Bogdanov, Vladimir; Woodstra, Chris; Erlewine, Stephen Thomas (2003). All music guide to the blues: the definitive guide to the blues. San Francisco, CA; Berkeley, CA; Milwaukee, WI: Backbeat Books ; Distributed to the Book trade in the U.S. and Canada by Publishers Group West ; Distributed to the music trade in the U.S. and Canada by Hal Leonard. ISBN   978-0-87930-736-3. OCLC   51389035.
  7. "All Music Guide to Hip-Hop". Backbeat Books . Hal Leonard Books . Retrieved April 24, 2011.