Steve Kazor

Last updated
Steve Kazor
Current position
Title Scout
Team Los Angeles Rams
Biographical details
Born1948
New Kensington, Pennsylvania
Playing career
1966–1969 Westminster (UT)
Position(s) Nose tackle
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1970 Westminster (UT) (assistant)
1971–1972 Camden Military Academy (SC)
1973 College of Emporia (assistant)
1974 Texas–Arlington (assistant)
1975 Colorado State (DL)
1976 Southern Utah State (DC)
1977–1978 Texas (DB)
1979–1980 UTEP (LB/RC)
1982–1992 Chicago Bears (STC/DA/TE/AHC)
1993 Iowa Wesleyan
1994–1996 Detroit Lions (TE/OL/ST)
1998–1999 McPherson
2000–2003 Wayne State (MI)
2004–2005 College of DuPage
2006 Ottawa Renegades (OL)
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1981 Dallas Cowboys (scout)
2007–present St. Louis / Los Angeles Rams (scout)
Head coaching record
Overall33–40 (college)

Steven Kazor (born 1948) is an American football scout and former coach. He is currently a scout with the Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League (NFL). Kazor served as the head football coach at Iowa Wesleyan College (1993), McPherson College (1998–1999), and Wayne State University (2000–2003), compiling a career college football record of 33–40. He was assistant coach in the NFL with the Chicago Bears from 1982 to 1992 and the Detroit Lions from 1994 to 1996. Working under head coach Mike Ditka, Kazor was a member of the coaching staff for the 1985 Chicago Bears, champions of Super Bowl XX.

Contents

Early life and playing career

Kazor was born in 1948 in New Kensington, Pennsylvania. [1] [2] A native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, he graduated from Rancho High School in North Las Vegas, Nevada. He attended Westminster College in Salt Lake City, Utah, where he lettered for four years on the football team, playing as a nose tackle, and was tri-captain in his senior year. [3]

Coaching career

After graduating from Westminster College, Kazor coached at Camden Military Academy in Camden, South Carolina. In 1973, he was named head football coach at the College of Emporia in Emporia, Kansas, but the school was closed in 1974. [4] Kazor spent the 1974 season at the University of Texas at Arlington as an assistant coach. The following year he was hired as defensive line coach at Colorado State University. [5] After working for a year at Colorado State under head coach Sark Arslanian, Kazor was hired in 1976 as the defensive coordinator at Southern Utah State College—now known as Southern Utah University—under head coach Tom Kingsford. In 1977, he moved to the University of Texas at Austin as an aide to head coach Fred Akers. [6]

Kazor was the linebackers coach at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) in 1979 and 1980 under head coach Bill Michael before moving to the National Football League (NFL) in 1981 to work as a scout for the Dallas Cowboys. In 1982, he was hired as the special teams coach for the NFL's Chicago Bears by newly appointed head coach Mike Ditka. [7]

After 11 seasons with the Bears, Kazor returned to the college football ranks, in 1993, when he was hired as the head football coach at Iowa Wesleyan College—now known as Iowa Wesleyan University. [8] Kazor was the head football coach at McPherson College in McPherson, Kansas for the 1998 and 1999 seasons. [9] His coaching record at McPherson was 12–8. [10] In February 2000, Kazor was named the head football coach at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. [11]

Head coaching record

College

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Iowa Wesleyan Tigers (NAIA Division II independent)(1993)
1993 Iowa Wesleyan8–3
Iowa Wesleyan:8–3
McPherson Bulldogs (Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference)(1998–1999)
1998 McPherson5–54–4T–4th
1999 McPherson7–35–3T–3rd
McPherson:12–89–7
Wayne State Warriors (Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference)(2000–2003)
2000 Wayne State4–64–6T–8th
2001 Wayne State3–73–6T–7th
2002 Wayne State3–83–7T–9th
2003 Wayne State3–82–8T–11th
Wayne State:13–2912–27
Total:33–40

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References

  1. "Steve Kazor; Special Teams". Chicago Tribune . Chicago, Illinois. January 3, 1986. p. 126. Retrieved June 3, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  2. "Steve Kazor". Chicago Tribune . Chicago, Illinois. September 7, 1986. Retrieved June 26, 2019.
  3. "Kazor Gets SUSC post". The Daily Spectrum. St. George, Utah. August 13, 1976. p. 7. Retrieved June 7, 2018 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  4. "Presbies". Emporia Gazette . Emporia, Kansas. December 19, 1973. p. 15. Retrieved June 26, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  5. "Kazor Moves". The High Point Enterprise. High Point, North Carolina. Associated Press. August 15, 1975. p. 15. Retrieved June 26, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  6. "SUSC Seeks Grid Aide". Daily Herald . Provo, Utah. March 31, 1977. p. 9. Retrieved June 26, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  7. "Ex-Miner coach joins Chicago Bear's staff". El Paso Times . El Paso, Texas. May 8, 1982. p. 19. Retrieved June 26, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  8. "Iowa Wesleyan hires Ditka staffer". Iowa City Press-Citizen . Iowa City, Iowa. August 2, 1993. p. 22. Retrieved June 26, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  9. "McPherson name Kazor as its coach". The Salina Journal . Salina, Kansas. May 28, 1998. p. 20. Retrieved June 26, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  10. "McPherson College Football Media Guide 2010" (PDF). McPherson College Athletics. Retrieved November 10, 2010.
  11. "Wayne State hires ex-Bears aide". Chicago Tribune . Chicago, Illinois. February 13, 2000. p. 34. Retrieved June 26, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .