Steve Stivers

Last updated

In November 2007, Stivers announced he would run for election to Congress in Ohio's 15th District, a seat held by retiring Republican member Deborah Pryce. He won the Republican nomination and ran against Democratic Franklin County Commissioner Mary Jo Kilroy, who had nearly unseated Pryce in 2006, Libertarian Mark Noble and Independent Don Elijah Eckhart. Stivers lost by 2,311 votes, conceding on December 7, 2008, after a long vote recount. [10]

2010

John Boehner, the then-House Minority Leader, campaigning for fellow Ohio Congressman Steve Stivers (left) during the 2010 midterm elections Boehnerandstivers.jpg
John Boehner, the then-House Minority Leader, campaigning for fellow Ohio Congressman Steve Stivers (left) during the 2010 midterm elections

Stivers won the Republican primary with 82% of the vote. [11] [12] He again faced Democratic incumbent Mary Jo Kilroy along with Constitution Party nominee David Ryon and Libertarian nominee William J. Kammerer. On November 2, 2010, Kilroy conceded to Stivers, who won by a 54% to 42% margin. [10]

2012

Redistricting after the 2010 census made the 15th much friendlier to Stivers. During his first term, he represented a fairly compact district covering all of Union and Madison counties, as well as most of downtown and western Columbus. The new map, however, pushed the 15th into more rural and exurban territory south and west of the capital.[ citation needed ]

Stivers ran again in 2012 against Democratic nominee Pat Lang. [13] He was endorsed by the NRA, National Right to Life, Ohio State Medical Association and United States Chamber of Commerce. Stivers was re-elected by 76,397 votes. [14]

2014

Stivers ran in 2014 against Democratic Scott Wharton. Gaining more than 66 percent of the vote, he was reelected for a third term. [15]

2016

Stivers ran in 2016 against Democrat Scott Wharton for the OH-15 seat. Winning 66.2% (222,847) of the vote to Wharton's 33.8% (113,960). [16]

Tenure

The Lugar Center and the McCourt School of Public Policy ranked Stivers as the 36th and 37th most bipartisan member of the U.S. House during the 114th (2015–17) and 115th Congresses. [17] [18] His resignation triggered a special election in 2021 which was won by fellow republican Mike Carey.

Budget, taxation, and other economic issues

Stivers has voted against raising the debt limit when there was no offset or systemic reform and supports prioritizing spending in the event that the debt limit is reached. [19] [20] Stiver voted in favor of a Balanced Budget Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. [21] Stivers voted to offset the costs of disaster relief spending through discretionary budget cuts. [20]

Stivers took a pledge to not support any tax raises. [19] He voted in favor of the Trump administration's 2017 tax legislation. [21]

Stivers voted in favor of legislation to dismantle financial regulations enacted by the Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. [21] He voted to repeal a rule that would have barred some financial services companies from including mandatory arbitration clauses in contracts. [21]

He voted to audit the Federal Reserve System. [19]

Stivers voted in favor of a stopgap funding measure to end the January 2018 federal government shutdown, but during the December 2018 to January 2019 partial federal government shutdown, Stivers voted against several pieces of legislation to reopen the federal government without appropriating money for a U.S.-Mexico border wall. [21]

In March 2021, all House Republicans including Stivers voted against the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021, an economic stimulus bill aimed at speeding up the United States' recovery from the economic and health effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and the ongoing recession. [22]

Health care

Stivers voted in favor of the American Health Care Act of 2017, legislation that would have partially repealed the Affordable Care Act. [21]

Energy and environment

Stivers voted against a measure to block President Trump from withdrawing the United States from the Paris Agreement on climate change. [21] Stivers voted against carbon tax. [21] He voted in favor of Congressional Review Act legislation that repealed the Stream Protection Rule, and voted in favor of a measure to delay implementation of the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) program. [21] He opposes federal regulations on efficiency standards. [19]

Gun control

Stivers voted against legislation to require universal background checks for firearm purchases. [21] He voted in favor of making concealed-carry permits issued in one state valid in other states. [21] He voted against a measure to grant law enforcement agencies additional time to conduct firearm-purchase background checks. [21]

Foreign policy

In 2019, Stivers voted against legislation to halt U.S. military assistance to the Saudi Arabian-led intervention in Yemen. [21] He voted in favor of 2017 legislation to impose additional sanctions against Russia, Iran, and North Korea, which passed on a 419–3 vote. [21]

Immigration and travel

Stivers opposed President Donald Trump's issuance of Executive Order 13769, which imposed a temporary ban on entry to the U.S. to citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries, in 2017. Stivers stated: "I believe the executive order risks violating our nation's values and fails to differentiate mainstream Islamic partners from radical Islamic terrorists — setting back our fight against radical Islam. I urge the Administration to quickly replace this temporary order with permanent improvements in the visa vetting process." [23]

In 2019, Stivers voted against overriding Trump's veto of a bill to overturn Trump's declaration of an emergency to direct funding for the construction of a U.S.-Mexico border wall. [21]

Privacy and technology

Stivers voted to rescind a Federal Communications Commission regulation that barred Internet service providers from sharing data on the Web activities of their customers. [21] Stivers voted in favor of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978 Amendments Act of 2008, including a provision reauthorizing a warrantless spying program. [21] Strivers voted against a measure that would have curtailed the power of officials to "search and read private messages collected incidentally" under Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act authorities. [21]

Stivers voted against the restoration of the net neutrality rule. [21]

Social issues

Stivers voted in favor of federal legislation to ban abortion after the 20th week of pregnancy. [21] He voted against repealing a rule that barred state and local governments from refusing to distribute federal funds to any Federally Qualified Health Center on the basis that that health center also performed abortions. [21] Stivers voted against a measure to oppose the Trump administration's ban on openly transgender Americans serving in the U.S. military. [21]

Social Security

In 2018, Stivers called for some form of bipartisan Social Security reform. [24]

National Republican Congressional Committee

Stivers beat Representative Roger Williams to be elected to chair the National Republican Congressional Committee in November 2016. As the leader of the NRCC, which is charged with helping elect Republican House candidates, Stivers said his goal was to "defy history" by protecting his party's House majority in the 2018 elections. [25] In June 2018, Stivers did not denounce the use of hacked materials in election campaigns, saying that as chair of the National Republican Congressional Committee he wouldn't "run down one of my candidates for using something that's in the public domain." [26] In a later interview in September 2018, Stivers made it clear he did not condone the use of hacked material, telling the press, "We are not seeking stolen or hacked material, we do not want to be stolen or hacked material, we have no intention of using stolen or hacked material." [27]

In the aftermath of the 2018 election, in which Republicans lost their House majority, Stivers announced that he would not run for re-election as NRCC chair. [28]

Candidate conduct

In response to congressional candidate Greg Gianforte being charged with assault on the eve of Montana's special election, [29] Stivers characterized the assault as "out of character." He said, "we all make mistakes" and "need to let the facts surrounding this incident unfold." [30] The assault was witnessed by four Fox News reporters and the victim's account corroborated by their audio recording. [31]

In July 2018, Stivers and the NRCC withdrew support from New Jersey candidate Seth Grossman following reports he shared a post from a white supremacist. [32]

Additionally, days before the midterm elections, Stivers sent a tweet condemning white nationalist comments and actions from Congressman Steve King, saying "We must stand up against white supremacy and hate in all forms can and I strongly condemn this behavior." [33]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Electoral history

Steve Stivers
Steve Stivers, Official Portrait, 112th Congress.jpg
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from Ohio's 15th district
In office
January 3, 2011 May 16, 2021
Election results [40]
YearOfficeElectionSubjectPartyVotes%OpponentPartyVotes%OpponentPartyVotes%OpponentPartyVotes%
2004 Ohio Senate General Steve Stivers Republican 95,25157.58%Katherine Thomsen Democratic 55,65633.65%Don Eckhart Independent 14,5098.77%
2008 U.S. House of Representatives General Steve Stivers Republican 137,27245.18% Mary Jo Kilroy Democratic 139,58445.94%Mark M. Noble Libertarian 14,0614.63%Don Eckhart Independent 12,9154.25%*
2010 U.S. House of Representatives General Steve Stivers Republican 119,47154.16% Mary Jo Kilroy Democratic 91,07741.29%William Kammerer Libertarian 6,1162.77%David Ryon Constitution 3,8871.76%**
2012 U.S. House of Representatives General Steve Stivers Republican 205,27761.56%Pat Lang Democratic 128,18838.44%
2014 U.S. House of Representatives General Steve Stivers Republican 128,49666.02%Scott Wharton Democratic 66,12533.98%
2016 U.S. House of Representatives General Steve Stivers Republican 222,84766.17%Scott Wharton Democratic 113,96033.84%
2018 U.S. House of Representatives General Steve Stivers Republican 166,63258.54%Rick Neal Democratic 112,54639.54%Jonathan Miller Libertarian 5,4771.92%
2020 U.S. House of Representatives General Steve Stivers Republican 243,10363.43%Joel Newby Democratic 140,18336.57%

*Write-in candidate Travis Casper received 6 votes (0.00197%)
**Write-in candidate Bill Buckel received 45 votes (0.02%)

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References

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  2. "Steve Stivers ancestry" . Retrieved January 1, 2016.
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  4. "Home - Steve Stivers for Congress". Steve Stivers for Congress. Retrieved October 31, 2018.
  5. "Prominent Alumni". www.deltau.org. Retrieved December 21, 2020.
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  25. Wehrman, Jessica (November 15, 2016). "GOP picks Ohio Rep. for campaign post". Dayton Daily News. Retrieved May 25, 2017.
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  27. Rebecca Berg (September 8, 2018). "Talks break down for bipartisan pledge to reject using hacked materials". CNN.
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Ohio Senate
Preceded by Member of the Ohio Senate
from the 16th district

2003–2008
Succeeded by
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's 15th congressional district

2011–2021
Succeeded by
Party political offices
Preceded by Chair of the National Republican Congressional Committee
2017–2019
Succeeded by
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded byas Former US Representative Order of precedence of the United States
as Former US Representative
Succeeded byas Former US Representative