Stuart Heisler

Last updated
Stuart Heisler
BornDecember 5, 1896
Los Angeles, California
DiedAugust 21, 1979(1979-08-21) (aged 82)
San Diego, California
Occupation(s) Film director, film editor

Stuart Heisler (December 5, 1896 – August 21, 1979) was an American film and television director. [1] He was a son of Luther Albert Heisler (1855–1916), a carpenter, and Frances Baldwin Heisler (1857–1935). He worked as a motion picture editor from 1921 to 1936, then worked as film director for the rest of his career.

Contents

Heisler directed the 1944 propaganda film The Negro Soldier , a documentary-style recruitment piece aimed at getting African-Americans to enlist in the U.S. military during World War II. [2] He found commercial and critical success in the late forties directing Susan Hayward in two of her breakthrough performances.

He received an Oscar nomination in 1949 for his contribution to the visual effects of the film Tulsa .

Partial filmography

As editor

As director

See also

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References

  1. "Stuart Heisler". Movies & TV Dept. The New York Times . 2014. Archived from the original on 2015-01-01.
  2. Bob Mastrangelo (2015). "The Negro Soldier". Movies & TV Dept. The New York Times . Archived from the original on 2015-04-03.