Stuart Heisler

Last updated
Stuart Heisler
Born December 5, 1896
Los Angeles, California
Died August 21, 1979(1979-08-21) (aged 82)
San Diego, California
Occupation Film director, film editor

Stuart Heisler (December 5, 1896 – August 21, 1979) was an American film and television director. [1] He was a son of Luther Albert Heisler (1855-1916), a carpenter, and Frances Baldwin Heisler (1857-1935). He worked as a motion picture editor from 1921 to 1936, then dedicated the rest of his career to that of a film director.

Film sequence of images that give the impression of movement

A film, also called a movie, motion picture, moving picture, or photoplay, is a series of still images that, when shown on a screen, create the illusion of moving images.

A television director is in charge of the activities involved in making a television program or section of a program. They are generally responsible for decisions about the editorial content and creative style of a program, and ensuring the producer's vision is delivered. Their duties may include originating program ideas, finding contributors, writing scripts, planning 'shoots', ensuring safety, leading the crew on location, directing contributors and presenters, and working with an editor to assemble the final product. The work of a television director can vary widely depending on the nature of the program, the practices of the production company, whether the program content is factual or drama, and whether it is live or recorded.

Contents

He directed the 1944 propaganda film The Negro Soldier , a documentary style recruitment piece targeting African-Americans. [2] He received an Oscar nomination in 1949 for his contribution to the visual effects of the film Tulsa .

Propaganda is information that is not objective and is used primarily to influence an audience and further an agenda, often by presenting facts selectively to encourage a particular synthesis or perception, or using loaded language to produce an emotional rather than a rational response to the information that is presented. Propaganda is often associated with material prepared by governments, but activist groups, companies, religious organizations and the media can also produce propaganda.

<i>The Negro Soldier</i> 1944 film by Stuart Heisler

The Negro Soldier is a 1944 documentary created by the United States Army during World War II. The film was produced by Frank Capra as a follow up to his successful film series Why We Fight. The army used this film as propaganda to convince Black Americans to enlist in the army and fight in the war. Most people regarded the film very highly, some going as far as to say that The Negro Soldier was "one of the finest things that ever happened to America". Due to both high reviews and great cinematography, The Negro Soldier proved to be a breakout film influencing army members and civilians of all races. In 2011, it was chosen to be preserved in the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress.

Academy Awards American awards given annually for excellence in cinematic achievements

The Academy Awards, also known as the Oscars, are a set of awards for artistic and technical merit in the film industry, given annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), to recognize excellence in cinematic achievements as assessed by the Academy's voting membership. The various category winners are awarded a copy of a golden statuette, officially called the "Academy Award of Merit", although more commonly referred to by its nickname "Oscar". The award was originally sculpted by George Stanley from a design sketch by Cedric Gibbons. AMPAS first presented it in 1929 at a private dinner hosted by Douglas Fairbanks in the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel.

Partial filmography

As editor

<i>The Love Light</i> 1921 film directed by Frances Marion

The Love Light is a 1921 American silent drama film starring Mary Pickford. The film was written and directed by Frances Marion.

Cytherea is a lost 1924 American silent romantic drama film directed by George Fitzmaurice and starring Alma Rubens, Constance Bennett, and Norman Kerry. Based on the novel Cytherea, Goddess of Love, by Joseph Hergesheimer and was adapted for the screen by Frances Marion. Cytherea features two dream sequences filmed in an early version of the Technicolor color film process.

<i>Tarnish</i> (film) 1924 silent film directed by George Fitzmaurice

Tarnish is a lost 1924 American silent drama film directed by George Fitzmaurice based upon the play of the same name by Gilbert Emery and starring May McAvoy, Ronald Colman, and Marie Prevost.

As director

Straight from the Shoulder is a 1936 American drama film directed by Stuart Heisler, written by Lucian Cary and Madeleine Ruthven, and starring Ralph Bellamy, Katherine Locke, David Holt, Andy Clyde, Purnell Pratt and Onslow Stevens. It was released on August 28, 1936, by Paramount Pictures.

<i>The Hurricane</i> (1937 film) 1937 film by Stuart Heisler, John Ford

The Hurricane is a 1937 film set in the South Seas, directed by John Ford and produced by Samuel Goldwyn Productions, about a Polynesian who is unjustly imprisoned. The climax features a special effects hurricane. It stars Dorothy Lamour and Jon Hall, with Mary Astor, C. Aubrey Smith, Thomas Mitchell, Raymond Massey, John Carradine, and Jerome Cowan. James Norman Hall, Jon Hall's uncle, co-wrote the novel of the same name on which The Hurricane is based.

The Biscuit Eater is a 1940 children's film starring Billy Lee and Cordell Hickman as two kids who raise a runt of a dog. It was named one of the Top Ten Films of 1940 by the National Board of Review. Walt Disney Productions made a 1972 remake under the same title.

See also

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