Stuttgarter Kickers

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Stuttgarter Kickers
Stuttgarter Kickers Logo.svg
Full nameSportverein Stuttgarter Kickers e.V.
Nickname(s)Die Blauen (The Blues),
Die Blauen-Götter (The Blue-Gods)
Founded21 September 1899;124 years ago (21 September 1899)
Ground Gazi-Stadion auf der Waldau
Capacity11,410
PresidentRainer Lorz
Head coachMustafa Ünal
League Regionalliga Südwest
2022–23 Oberliga Baden-Württemberg 1st of 18 (promoted)
Website Club website

Stuttgarter Kickers is a German association football club that plays in Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg, founded on 21 September 1899 as FC Stuttgarter Cickers.

Contents

History

In its early years the club had a decent local squad that played in the Südkreis-Liga, Kreisliga Württemberg and then in the Bezirksliga Württemberg. With the reorganization of German football during the Third Reich in 1933, the team – now known as SV Stuttgarter Kickers – found itself in the Gauliga Württemberg, one of sixteen top tier regional leagues established in the country during that time. It continued to have good results locally, but was unable to impress beyond its own area. In the final year of World War II the Kickers fielded a combined wartime squad with Sportfreunde Stuttgart.

Historical chart of Stuttgarter Kickers league performance Stuttgarter Kickers Performance Chart.png
Historical chart of Stuttgarter Kickers league performance

After the war the club resumed play in the Oberliga Süd and performed as a mid-table team early on. By 1950 it had slipped to the lower half of the table with a seemingly solid grip in 14th place, constantly struggling to avoid relegation throughout the decade. Kickers spent the early 60s in tier II football, but after the formation of the Bundesliga, Germany's new professional league, in 1963, the club was moved to the Regionalliga Süd. In 1974, that league went professional and became the 2. Bundesliga. Between 1963 and the late 1980s the team had varying results, but finally stabilized in the upper half of the standings toward the end of that period. It has one losing appearance to its credit in the DFB-Pokal in 1987 and in 1988–89 it made it to the Bundesliga for the first time. It ended a run of 28 years as a second division outfit. The team was immediately relegated after a 17th-place finish, but continued to deliver some of its best performances. Die Blauen advanced to the semi-finals of the 2000 DFB-Pokal and then had a second turn in the Bundesliga in 1991–92, but with the same result as its earlier time up. Over the next decade the club played largely in the second division, before slipping to the Regionalliga Süd (III) in 2001, where they remained until 2008, when a tenth-place finish narrowly qualified them for the new 3. Liga. They finished last (20th) in the 3. Liga in 2008–09 and were relegated to the Regionalliga Süd. After three seasons at Regionalliga level, the Kickers returned to the 3. Liga in 2012 where they played for four seasons until relegation at the end of 2015–16, now dropping down to the Regionalliga Südwest. In 2018 they were relegated once more to the Oberliga Baden-Württemberg.

Other departments

The Stuttgarter Kickers also have handball, athletics, table tennis, cheerleading, and lacrosse departments. The association is also recognized for its training of football referees and other game officials. They had a field hockey department too, which in 1957 became independent under the name of HTC Stuttgarter Kickers.

Players

Current squad

As of 3 September 2023 [1]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No.Pos.NationPlayer
1 GK Flag of Germany.svg  GER Felix Dornebusch
3 DF Flag of Germany.svg  GER David Kammerbauer
4 DF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Mathis Bruns(on loan from 1. FC Union Berlin)
5 DF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Marcel Schmidts
6 DF Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  BIH Melvin Ramusović
7 FW Flag of Germany.svg  GER Loris Maier
8 MF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Luigi Campagna
9 MF Flag of Turkey.svg  TUR Sinan Tekerci
10 FW Flag of Germany.svg  GER Kevin Dicklhuber
11 DF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Marian Riedinger
13 MF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Jonas Kohler
15 MF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Nico Blank
16 GK Flag of Germany.svg  GER Maximilian Otto
17 FW Flag of Germany.svg  GER Konrad Riehle
18 DF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Niklas Kolbe
No.Pos.NationPlayer
19 DF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Cedric Guarino
20 MF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Leon Maier
21 GK Flag of Germany.svg  GER Ramon Castellucci
22 FW Flag of Germany.svg  GER David Braig
23 MF Flag of Croatia.svg  CRO Marko Pilic
25 DF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Paul Polauke
27 FW Flag of Austria.svg  AUT Daniel Kalajdžić
28 MF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Lukas Kiefer
29 FW Flag of Germany.svg  GER David Stojak
33 FW Flag of Germany.svg  GER Niklas Antlitz
34 FW Flag of Turkey.svg  TUR Halim Eroglu
35 GK Flag of Germany.svg  GER Léon Neaimé
37 FW Flag of Germany.svg  GER Flamur Berisha
38 MF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Christian Mauersberger

Out on loan

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No.Pos.NationPlayer
DF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Malte Moos(at Astoria Walldorf until 30 June 2024)
No.Pos.NationPlayer
MF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Ivo Ćolić(at FV Ravensburg until 30 June 2024)

Reserve team

The Stuttgarter Kickers II, historically also known as Stuttgarter Kickers Amateure, have been playing in the Oberliga Baden-Württemberg since 2000. Previously, the team fluctuated between the Landesliga and Verbandsliga Württemberg.

Honours

The club's honours:

Recent seasons

The recent season-by-season performance of the club: [2] [3]

Key

Promoted Relegated

Presidential history

The club's presidents: [4]

Coaching history

The club's coaches: [5]

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References

  1. "Kader". stuttgarter-kickers.de. Retrieved 24 August 2023.
  2. Das deutsche Fußball-Archiv (in German) Historical German domestic league tables, accessed: 20 September 2014
  3. Fussball.de – Ergebnisse (in German) Tables and results of all German football leagues, accessed: 20 September 2014
  4. http://www.stuttgarter-kickers.de/verein/vereinsgeschichte/prasidenten (in German) stuttgarter-kickers.de, accessed: 3 May 2017
  5. Stuttgarter Kickers .:. Trainer von A-Z (in German) weltfussball.de, accessed: 17 September 2011