Sun Jiagan

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Sun Jiagan (Chinese :孫嘉淦; Hanyu Pinyin :Sūn Jiāgàn; Tongyong Pinyin :Sun Chia-kan, [1] 1683–1753) was a Chinese politician of the Qing dynasty.

Born in Taiyuan, Shanxi, Sun was son of a family that was so poor that he had to work hard all day collecting firewood, and could only study at night.

In 1713, he graduated as a jinshi in the imperial examination during the reign of the Kangxi Emperor [2] and rose to the position of Libu Shilang [note 1] for his frankness and uprightness.

During the reign of the Qianlong Emperor, Sun rose to the position of Xingbu Shangshu [note 2] by 1730[ citation needed ], and later to Libu Shangshu in 1738. [2] He was degraded for disrespect in taking up the Qianlong Emperor's pencil to write with. However, the emperor restored him to office.[ citation needed ]

After holding various posts, in 1741 Sun became Viceroy of Huguang, where he introduced the system of subsidized chiefs, in order to keep the aborigines under control.

In 1743, he was relieved from his position due to shielding his men, [2] yet was recalled to be head of the Imperial Clan Court in 1744. [2] In 1745 he retired[ citation needed ], but resumed office and served as Gongbu Shangshu [note 3] in 1750.

Notes

  1. Li Bu (in Chinese), a ministry (Bu) for selecting civil servants (Li) in feudal China; Shi Lang (in Chinese) is an equivalent of Vice Minister.
  2. Xingbu Shangshu (in Chinese), equivalent to today's Justice Minister.
  3. An equivalent of Interior Minister.

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References

  1. 李景屏, 康國昌 (2000). 乾隆、和珅與劉墉. p. 249. ISBN   9570492376. 案發生於乾隆十六年〔一七五一年)的偽奏稿案,就是對遏制言路的高壓政策的一種反抗。孫[嘉]淦係康熙五十一一年〈一七一三年)進士,曾任侍郎、尚書、督撫等職,為官清廉剛正。
  2. 1 2 3 4 Histories: Sun Jiagan dies (in Chinese). Retrieved 9 Nov 2013.