Sunshine 60

Last updated
Sunshine 60
サンシャイン60
Sunshine 60.JPG
Sunshine 60
General information
Type Mixed-use
Location3-1-1 Higashi-Ikebukuro
Toshima, Tokyo, Japan
Coordinates 35°43′46.5″N139°43′4″E / 35.729583°N 139.71778°E / 35.729583; 139.71778 Coordinates: 35°43′46.5″N139°43′4″E / 35.729583°N 139.71778°E / 35.729583; 139.71778
Construction startedJuly 1973
Completed1978
OpeningMarch 1978
Owner Mitsubishi Estate Co.
Height
Roof239.7 m (786 ft)
Technical details
Floor count60 above ground
5 below ground
Floor area241,546 m2 (2,599,980 sq ft)
Design and construction
ArchitectMitsubishi Estate Co.
DeveloperMitsubishi Estate Co.

Sunshine 60 (サンシャイン60, Sanshain rokujū) is a 60-story, mixed-use skyscraper located in Ikebukuro, Toshima, Tokyo, adjoining the Sunshine City complex. At the time of its completion in 1978, the 239.7 m (786 ft) building was the tallest in Asia, a title it held until 1985 when it was surpassed by the 63 Building in Seoul. Sunshine 60 was also the tallest building in Tokyo and Japan until the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building was completed in 1991, [1] and housed the world's fastest elevators (at 600 metres per minute (2,000 ft/min)) until the opening of the Yokohama Landmark Tower in 1993; Mitsubishi Electric installed the elevators at the former's highest-rise bank (partially from designs MELCO licensed from the Westinghouse Electric Corporation)[ clarification needed ] as well as the latter, and Mitsubishi Estate owns both buildings.

Contents

Construction

Sunshine 60's foundation is made of reinforced concrete. The lower segment of the building is also reinforced concrete with a steel skeleton. The upper tower is a steel skeleton with "slitted shear walls". These unique walls were inserted between columns in the core, allowing the walls to conform to deformations in the steel frame caused by earthquakes and wind shear helping to assure structural integrity. A rigid framing structural system creates the frame. Mechanical equipment is located directly above the core of the structure on its rooftop.

Sunshine 60 was erected over the site of the destroyed Sugamo Prison, famously used to hold senior Japanese war criminals during the occupation. On December 23, 1948, seven high-ranking, convicted war criminals (including former Prime Minister Hideki Tojo) were hanged at the prison. It was also the site of the hanging of Soviet spy Richard Sorge during the war. In popular modern lore, the area is rumored to be haunted. [1]

Facilities

As a mixed-use high-rise, Sunshine 60's space is used for a variety of purposes. Floors 1 through 9 are used as commercial space and house a post office, banks, showrooms, cafeterias, a health care center and a day care center. Office space occupies floors 10 through 57. Restaurants are located on the 58th and 59th floors.

From the 60th floor, visitors can see as far as 100 km on a clear day from Sunshine 60's observation deck (admission fee up to ¥620 [2] ). To get visitors to the observation deck quickly, the observation deck bank of the tower's 40 elevators takes passengers directly from the lobby at a speed of 600 meters per minute (36 km/h, 22 mph). Between its opening and 1993 (the opening of Yokohama Landmark Tower), the observation deck elevators were the fastest in the world. [3]

Office tenants

The office floors house the headquarters of Credit Saison, FamilyMart, NTT Plala and Sammy Corporation, among other office tenants.

See also

Related Research Articles

Bank of China Tower (Hong Kong) Skyscraper in Central, Hong Kong

The Bank of China Tower is a skyscraper located in Central, Hong Kong. Located at 1 Garden Road on Hong Kong Island, the tower houses the headquarters of the Bank of China Limited. One of the most recognisable landmarks in Hong Kong, the building is notable for its distinct shape and design, consisting of triangular frameworks covered by glass curtain walls.

Empire State Building Office skyscraper in Manhattan, New York

The Empire State Building is a 102-story Art Deco skyscraper in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States. It was designed by Shreve, Lamb & Harmon and built from 1930 to 1931. Its name is derived from "Empire State", the nickname of the state of New York. The building has a roof height of 1,250 feet (380 m) and stands a total of 1,454 feet (443.2 m) tall, including its antenna. The Empire State Building stood as the world's tallest building until the construction of the World Trade Center in 1970; following its collapse in 2001, the Empire State Building was again the city's tallest skyscraper until 2012. As of 2020, the building is the seventh-tallest building in New York City, the ninth-tallest completed skyscraper in the United States, the 49th-tallest in the world, and the sixth-tallest freestanding structure in the Americas.

Skyscraper High-rise building

A skyscraper is a tall continuously habitable building having multiple floors. Modern sources currently define skyscrapers as being at least 100 metres or 150 metres in height, though there is no universally accepted definition. Historically, the term first referred to buildings with between 10 and 20 stories when these types of buildings began to be constructed in the 1880s. Skyscrapers may host offices, hotels, residential spaces, and retail spaces.

John Hancock Center

The John Hancock Center is a 100-story, 1,128-foot supertall skyscraper located in Chicago, Illinois. Located in the Magnificent Mile district, its name was changed to 875 North Michigan Avenue on February 12, 2018. Despite this, the building is still colloquially called the John Hancock Center.

Tokyo Tower Telecommunications and observation tower in Tokyo, Japan

The Tokyo Tower is a communications and observation tower in the Shiba-koen district of Minato, Tokyo, Japan. At 332.9 meters (1,092 ft), it is the second-tallest structure in Japan. The structure is an Eiffel Tower-inspired lattice tower that is painted white and international orange to comply with air safety regulations.

Taipei 101 Skyscraper located in Xinyi District, Taipei, Taiwan

The Taipei 101, formerly known as the Taipei World Financial Center (臺北國際金融中心), is an extremely tall skyscraper designed by C.Y. Lee and C.P. Wang in Xinyi, Taipei, Taiwan. This building was officially classified as the world's tallest from its opening in 2004 until the 2009 completion of the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, UAE.

Columbia Center Office skyscraper in Seattle, Washington, United States. Tallest building in Washington (state).

The Columbia Center, formerly named the Bank of America Tower and Columbia Seafirst Center, is a skyscraper in downtown Seattle, Washington, United States. The 76-story structure is the tallest building in Seattle and the state of Washington, reaching a height of 933 ft (284 m). At the time of its completion, the Columbia Center was the tallest structure on the West Coast; as of 2017 it is the fourth-tallest, behind buildings in Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Jin Mao Tower Skyscraper in Shanghai

The Jin Mao Tower, also known as the Jinmao Building or Jinmao Tower, is a 420.5-meter-tall (1,380 ft), 88-story landmark skyscraper in Lujiazui, Pudong, Shanghai, China. It contains a shopping mall, offices and the Grand Hyatt Shanghai hotel which starts from the 53rd floor, which at the time of completion was the highest hotel in the world. Along with the Oriental Pearl Tower, the Shanghai World Financial Center and the Shanghai Tower it is part of the Lujiazui skyline seen from the Bund. It was the tallest building in China from its completion in 1999 until 2007, when it was surpassed by the Shanghai World Financial Center which is located close by. The Shanghai Tower, a 121-story building located next to these two buildings, surpassed the height of both these buildings in 2015, creating the world's first trio of adjacent supertall skyscrapers.

30 Rockefeller Plaza Office skyscraper in Manhattan, New York

30 Rockefeller Plaza is a skyscraper that forms the centerpiece of Rockefeller Center in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. Completed in 1933, the 66-story, 850 ft (260 m) building was designed in the Art Deco style by Raymond Hood, Rockefeller Center's lead architect. 30 Rockefeller Center was formerly known as the RCA Building from its opening to 1988 and as the GE Building from 1988 to 2015. It was renamed the Comcast Building in 2015, following the transfer of ownership to new corporate owner Comcast. The building's name is sometimes shortened to 30 Rock, a nickname that inspired an NBC sitcom of the same name.

Shanghai World Financial Center Skyscraper in Shanghai

The Shanghai World Financial Center is a supertall skyscraper located in the Pudong district of Shanghai. It was designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox and developed by the Mori Building Company, with Leslie E. Robertson Associates as its structural engineer and China State Construction Engineering Corp and Shanghai Construction (Group) General Co. as its main contractor. It is a mixed-use skyscraper, consisting of offices, hotels, conference rooms, observation decks, and ground-floor shopping malls. Park Hyatt Shanghai is the tower's hotel component, comprising 174 rooms and suites occupying the 79th to the 93rd floors, which at the time of completion was the highest hotel in the world. It is now the third-highest hotel in the world after the Ritz-Carlton, Hong Kong, which occupies floors 102 to 118 of the International Commerce Centre.

85 Sky Tower Skyscraper in Lingya, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

85 Sky Tower, formerly known as the T & C Tower or Tuntex Sky Tower, is an 85-story skyscraper in Lingya District, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. The structure is 347.5 m (1,140 ft) high. An antenna increases the pinnacle height to 378 m (1,240 ft). Constructed from 1994 to 1997, it is the tallest skyscraper in Kaohsiung, and was the tallest in Taiwan until the completion of Taipei 101 in 2004.

Southeast Financial Center Real estate development in Miami, Florida

Southeast Financial Center is a two-acre development in Miami, Florida, United States. It consists of a 765 feet (233 m) tall office skyscraper and its 15-story parking garage. It was previously known as the Southeast Financial Center (1984–1992), the First Union Financial Center (1992–2003) and the Wachovia Financial Center (2003–2011). In 2011, it retook its old name of Southeast Financial Center as Wachovia merged with Wells Fargo and moved to the nearby Wells Fargo Center.

Yokohama Landmark Tower

The Yokohama Landmark Tower is the second tallest building and 4th tallest structure in Japan, standing 296.3 m (972 ft) high. Until surpassed by Abeno Harukas in 2012, it stood as the tallest building in Japan. It is located in the Minato Mirai 21 district of Yokohama city, next to the Yokohama Museum of Art.

63 Building Skyscraper in South Korea

The 63 Building, officially called 63 SQUARE, is a skyscraper on Yeouido island, overlooking the Han River in Seoul, South Korea. It was designed by Harry D Som and Helen W Som, principals of Som and Associates of San Francisco. At 249 meters (817 ft) high, it was the tallest building outside North America when it opened in July 27, 1985, and remains the tallest gold-clad structure in the world. It stood as South Korea's tallest building until the Hyperion Tower surpassed it in 2003, but remained the country's tallest commercial building until the Northeast Asia Trade Tower was topped-out in 2009. Lotte World Tower in 2017 became Korea's tallest skyscraper.

Skyscraper design and construction

The design and construction of skyscrapers involves creating safe, habitable spaces in very high buildings. The buildings must support their weight, resist wind and earthquakes, and protect occupants from fire. Yet they must also be conveniently accessible, even on the upper floors, and provide utilities and a comfortable climate for the occupants. The problems posed in skyscraper design are considered among the most complex encountered given the balances required between economics, engineering, and construction management.

Sunshine City, Tokyo Building in Tokyo

Sunshine City is a building complex located in East Ikebukuro, Toshima, Tokyo, Japan. It has the 240-metre tall Sunshine 60 skyscraper at its centre. Sunshine City consists of four buildings: Sunshine 60, the main and tallest building, which includes corporate offices as well as restaurants; the Prince Hotel; the World Import Mart; and the Bunka Kaikan building. The complex sits on land that was once occupied by Sugamo Prison.

Shanghai Tower Skyscraper in Shanghai

Shanghai Tower is a 128-story, 632-meter (2,073 ft)-tall megatall skyscraper in Lujiazui, Pudong, Shanghai. It is the world's second-tallest building by height to architectural top and it shares the record of having the world's highest observation deck within a building or structure at 562 m. It had the world's second-fastest elevators at a top speed of 20.5 meters per second until 2017, when it was surpassed by the Guangzhou CTF Finance Center, with its top speed of 21 meters per second. Designed by international design firm Gensler and owned by the Shanghai Municipal Government, it is the tallest of the world's first triple-adjacent supertall buildings in Pudong, the other two being the Jin Mao Tower and the Shanghai World Financial Center. Its tiered construction, designed for high energy efficiency, provides nine separate zones divided between office, retail and leisure use.

Shinjuku Sumitomo Building

Shinjuku Sumitomo Building is a high-rise building in Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku, Tokyo.

Mitsubishi Logistics

Mitsubishi Logistics, Inc. is a logistics company with its headquarters in Shinkawa, Chuo-ku, Tokyo. It is a member of the Mitsubishi group and a participant of Mitsubishi Kinyokai and Mitsubishi Public Affairs Committee.

Owl Tower

The Owl Tower (アウルタワー) is a residential building in the Toshima special ward of Tokyo, Japan. Completed in January 2011, it stands at 189.2 m (621 ft) tall, with the top floor located at 182.8 m (600 ft). It is the 38th tallest building in Tokyo and the 55th tallest building in Japan.

References

  1. 1 2 "Sunshine 60". Skyscraperpage.com. Retrieved 2008-09-25.
  2. "Sunshine 60 Observatory pamphlet" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-04-12. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  3. "Six of the World's 10 Fastest Elevators Are in Asia". asianoffbeat.com. 2007-10-17. Archived from the original on 2012-08-31. Retrieved 2008-09-25.
Records
Preceded by
Shinjuku Mitsui Building
Tallest building in Japan
240 m (786 ft)
19781990
Succeeded by
Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building No. 1
Tallest building in Tokyo
240 m (786 ft)
19781990