Supersport World Championship

Last updated
Supersport World Championship
Current season, competition or edition:
Sports current event.svg 2018 Supersport World Championship
WorldSSlogo.png
Sport Motorcycle sport
Founded 1997 (World Series)
1999 (World Championship)
Country Worldwide
Most recent
champion(s)
Sandro Cortese (rider)
Yamaha (manufacturer)
Gianluca Vizziello riding the RG Team Yamaha YZF-R6 at Phillip Island Motorcycle phillip island.jpg
Gianluca Vizziello riding the RG Team Yamaha YZF-R6 at Phillip Island

The Supersport World Championship, short WorldSSP, is a motorcycle racing competition on paved surfaces, based on mid-sized sports motorcycles. Competition machines are based on 600-750cc - depending on the number of cylinders - production-based motorcycles. The championship runs as a support class to the Superbike World Championship, which is similarly based on large production-based sports motorcycles. The championship, organized and promoted as its parent series by FGSport—renamed Infront Motor Sports in 2008 [1] —until 2012 and by Dorna from the 2013 season onwards, [2] is sanctioned by the FIM.

Motorcycle racing racing sport using motorcycles

Motorcycle racing is the motorcycle sport of racing motorcycles. Major genres include motorcycle road racing and off-road racing, both either on circuits or open courses, and track racing. Other categories include hill climbs, drag racing and land speed record trials.

Superbike World Championship is a motorsport road racing series for modified production motorcycles also known as superbike racing. The championship was founded in 1988. The Superbike World Championship consists of a series of rounds held on permanent racing facilities. Each round has two races and the results of each race are combined to determine two annual World Championships, one for riders and one for manufacturers.

Dorna Sports, S.L. is the commercial rights holder for the motorcycling sport of MotoGP.

Contents

Overview

Supersport was introduced as a support class to the Superbike World Championship in 1990 as a European Championship. The series allows four-cylinder engines up to 600 cubic centimetres (37 cu in), three-cylinder engines up to 675 cubic centimetres (41.2 cu in), and twin-cylinder power plants up to 750 cubic centimetres (46 cu in). In 1997 the championship became a "World Series" and the European title was given to the European Motorcycle Union's European Road Racing Championship. The full title Supersport World Championship was introduced in 1999. [3] Supersport racing has also been one of the most popular classes of national racing for many years.

Several riders who were successful in World Supersport have moved on to high-level competitions, notably, Cal Crutchlow, Chaz Davies, and Chris Vermeulen, though others such as Fabien Foret and Kenan Sofuoğlu have spent several years in this championship.

Cal Crutchlow British motorcycle racer

Cal Crutchlow is a British professional motorcycle road racer, who currently competes in the MotoGP World Championship for CWM LCR Honda. In early 2017, the RAC awarded Crutchlow the Torrens Trophy, an accolade made in recognition of "outstanding contribution to motorcycling in the United Kingdom". When making the award, the RAC spokesperson cited "the first Brit to win a premier class race since Barry Sheene in 1981".

Chaz Davies British motorcycle racer

Chaz Davies, is a British motorcycle racer. He is the 2011 World Supersport champion and also the 2011 BBC Wales Sports Personality of the Year.

Chris Vermeulen Australian motorcycle racer

Chris Vermeulen is an Australian motorcycle racer who last competed in the World Superbike Championship for the works Kawasaki team.

Competition in the championship is typically fierce, and season domination by a single competitor is unusual. The 2001 championship was particularly notable in this respect, the champion being Andrew Pitt who did not win a single race, but amassed a championship-winning total of points by finishing near the front of the field in almost every race.

Andrew Pitt Australian motorcycle racer

Andrew Pitt is a retired motorcycle racer. He is a double World Supersport Champion, and has also won a World Superbike race and competed in MotoGP. He lives in Peel on the Isle of Man.

Regulations

Technical regulations

In 2012, to be eligible for Supersport World Championship, a motorcycle must satisfy FIM's homologation requirements and have a four-stroke engine in one of the following configurations: [4]

Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme international sport governing body

The Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme is the global governing/sanctioning body of motorcycle racing. It represents 113 national motorcycle federations that are divided into six regional continental unions.

Homologation is the granting of approval by an official authority. This may be a court of law, a government department, or an academic or professional body, any of which would normally work from a set of strict rules or standards to determine whether such approval should be given. The word may be considered very roughly synonymous with accreditation, and in fact in French and Spanish may be used with regard to academic degrees. Certification is another possible synonym, while to homologate is the infinitive verb form.

As of 2015, the homologated motorcycles are Honda CBR600RR, Kawasaki ZX-6R, MV Agusta F3 675, Suzuki GSX-R600, Triumph Daytona 675 and Yamaha YZF-R6; [5] formerly homologated motorcycles include Bimota YB9, Ducati 748, Ducati 749, Honda CBR600F, Triumph Daytona 600 and Yamaha YZF600R. [6] [7]

Honda CBR600RR motorcycle

The Honda CBR600RR is a 599 cc (36.6 cu in) sport bike, part of the CBR series that was introduced by Honda in 2003 as a race replica version of Honda's CBR600F series. It won every Supersport World Championship title from 2002 to 2008, and again in 2010 and 2014. The engine for the Moto2 World Championship in MotoGP was also based on the CBR600RR since the class débuted in 2010, and was used until the end of the 2018 season before they are replaced by 765cc triple engines supplied by Triumph Motorcycles for the 2019 season.

Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R

The Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R is a 600 cc class motorcycle in the Ninja sport bike series from the Japanese manufacturer Kawasaki. It was introduced in 1995, and has been constantly updated throughout the years in response to new products from Honda, Suzuki, and Yamaha. The ZX series is what was known as the Ninja line of Kawasaki motorcycles in the 1980s and still carries the name today.

Suzuki GSX-R600

The Suzuki GSX-R600 is a 600 cc class, or supersport, sport bike in Suzuki's GSX-R series of motorcycles.

Supersport regulations are much tighter than in Superbikes. The chassis of a supersport machine must remain largely as standard, while engine tuning is possible but tightly regulated. For instance, the displacement capacity, bore and stroke must remain at the homologated size. Modifying the bore and stroke to reach class limits is not allowed. [4] As in World Superbike, a control tyre is used, although World Supersport regulations dictate that the tyres must be road legal and therefore slicks are not allowed.

Sporting regulations

A Supersport World Championship race takes place at almost every Superbike World Championship round. Starting positions are decided by the riders' fastest laps from two 45-minute qualifying sessions. Each race is approximately 100 kilometres (62 mi) long. Typically, the race takes place between the two Superbike races.

The points system is the same for the riders' championship and the manufacturers' championship, but only the highest-finishing motorcycle by a particular manufacturer is awarded the points for the latter championship.

Points scoring system
Position123456789101112131415
Points252016131110987654321

Champions

SeasonRider champion [8] TeamMotorcycleManufacturer champion [9]
World Series
1997 Flag of Italy.svg Paolo Casoli Gio.Ca.Moto Ducati 748 Ducati
1998 Flag of Italy.svg Fabrizio Pirovano Team Alstare Corona Suzuki GSX-R600 Suzuki
World Championship
1999 Flag of France.svg Stéphane Chambon Suzuki Alstare F.S. Suzuki GSX-R600 Yamaha
2000 Flag of Germany.svg Jörg Teuchert Alpha Technik Yamaha Yamaha YZF-R6 Yamaha
2001 Flag of Australia.svg Andrew Pitt Fuchs Kawasaki Kawasaki ZX-6R Yamaha
2002 Flag of France.svg Fabien Foret Ten Kate Honda Honda CBR600F Suzuki
2003 Flag of Australia.svg Chris Vermeulen Ten Kate Honda Honda CBR600RR Honda
2004 Flag of Australia.svg Karl Muggeridge Ten Kate Honda Honda CBR600RR Honda
2005 Flag of France.svg Sébastien Charpentier Winston Ten Kate Honda Honda CBR600RR Honda
2006 Flag of France.svg Sébastien Charpentier Winston Ten Kate Honda Honda CBR600RR Honda
2007 Flag of Turkey.svg Kenan Sofuoğlu Hannspree Ten Kate Honda Honda CBR600RR Honda
2008 Flag of Australia.svg Andrew Pitt Hannspree Ten Kate Honda Honda CBR600RR Honda
2009 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Cal Crutchlow Yamaha World Supersport Yamaha YZF-R6 Honda
2010 Flag of Turkey.svg Kenan Sofuoğlu Hannspree Ten Kate Honda Honda CBR600RR Honda
2011 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Chaz Davies Yamaha ParkinGO Team Yamaha YZF-R6 Yamaha
2012 Flag of Turkey.svg Kenan Sofuoğlu Kawasaki Lorenzini Kawasaki ZX-6R Honda
2013 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sam Lowes Yakhnich Motorsport Yamaha YZF-R6 Kawasaki
2014 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van der Mark PATA Honda World Supersport Honda CBR600RR Honda
2015 Flag of Turkey.svg Kenan Sofuoğlu Kawasaki Puccetti Racing Kawasaki ZX-6R Kawasaki
2016 Flag of Turkey.svg Kenan Sofuoğlu Kawasaki Puccetti Racing Kawasaki ZX-6R Kawasaki
2017 Flag of France.svg Lucas Mahias GRT Yamaha Official WorldSSP Team Yamaha YZF-R6 Yamaha
2018 Flag of Germany.svg Sandro Cortese Kallio Racing Yamaha YZF-R6 Yamaha
By rider
RiderChampionshipsYear
Flag of Turkey.svg Kenan Sofuoğlu 5 2007, 2010, 2012, 2015, 2016
Flag of France.svg Sébastien Charpentier 2 2005, 2006
Flag of Australia.svg Andrew Pitt 2 2001, 2008
Flag of Italy.svg Paolo Casoli 1 1997
Flag of Italy.svg Fabrizio Pirovano 1 1998
Flag of France.svg Stéphane Chambon 1 1999
Flag of Germany.svg Jörg Teuchert 1 2000
Flag of France.svg Fabien Foret 1 2002
Flag of Australia.svg Chris Vermeulen 1 2003
Flag of Australia.svg Karl Muggeridge 1 2004
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Cal Crutchlow 1 2009
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Chaz Davies 1 2011
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Sam Lowes 1 2013
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Michael van der Mark 1 2014
Flag of France.svg Lucas Mahias 1 2017
Flag of Germany.svg Sandro Cortese 1 2018
By manufacturer
ManufacturerChampionshipsYear
Flag of Japan.svg Honda 10 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2012, 2014
Flag of Japan.svg Yamaha 6 1999, 2000, 2001, 2011, 2017, 2018
Flag of Japan.svg Kawasaki 3 2013, 2015, 2016
Flag of Japan.svg Suzuki 2 1998, 2002
Flag of Italy.svg Ducati 1 1997

See also

Related Research Articles

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Leandro Mercado Argentine motorcycle racer

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MotoAmerica

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The FIM Asia Road Racing Championship is the regional motorcycle road racing championship for Asia, held since 1996.

References

  1. "Infront rebrands leading promoter in motor sport, FGSport, as Infront Motor Sports". infrontsports.com. Infront Sports & Media. 31 October 2008. Retrieved 20 March 2015.
  2. Sam Tremayne (2 October 2012). "Dorna to organise both World Superbikes and MotoGP from 2013". autosport.com. Haymarket Media Group . Retrieved 20 March 2015.
  3. "110th FIM anniversary – Flash Back 1996–1999". fim-live.com. Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme. 8 December 2014. Retrieved 20 March 2015.
  4. 1 2 "Road Racing FIM Superbike & Supersport World Championships & FIM Superstock Cup regulations 2012" (PDF). v2-fim-live.com. Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme . Retrieved 8 November 2012.
  5. "Listing of FIM homologated motorcycles for 2015". fim-live.com. Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme. 15 February 2015. Retrieved 20 March 2015.
  6. "Superbike/Supersport World Championships: rules, time schedule, wild-card riders in Kyalami, list of homologated motorcycles". fim.ch. Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme. 18 March 1999. Archived from the original on 11 October 1999. Retrieved 20 March 2015.
  7. "Listing of FIM homologated motorcycles for 2007" (PDF). v2-fim-live.com. Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme. 5 April 2007. Retrieved 20 March 2015.
  8. "Supersport Champions - Riders". oldsbk.perugiatiming.com. Superbike World Championship. Archived from the original on 7 February 2015. Retrieved 20 March 2015.
  9. "Supersport Champions - Manufacturers". oldsbk.perugiatiming.com. Superbike World Championship. Archived from the original on 7 February 2015. Retrieved 20 March 2015.