Susuwat

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Susuwat is a traditional Filipino ethnic Moro weapon. It is light and devastating used by the indigenous people of Mindanao. It is a single blade with a wide tipped and a triple prong designed for forward cutting. The sword is about 24 to 28 inches in length with a hooked grip to prevent slipping when wet. [1]

Filipinos people native to or citizens of the islands of the Philippines

Filipinos are the people who are native to or identified with the country of the Philippines. Filipinos come from various Austronesian ethnolinguistic groups. Currently, there are more than 175 ethnolinguistic groups, each with its own language, identity, culture and history. The modern Filipino identity, with its Austronesian roots, was mainly influenced by China, the United States and Spain.

Mindanao second largest island of the Philippines

Mindanao or still commonly known as Southern Philippines, is the second-largest island in the Philippines. Mindanao and the smaller islands surrounding it make up the island group of the same name. Located in the southern region of the archipelago, as of the 2010 census, the main island was inhabited by 20,281,545 people, while the entire Mindanao island group had an estimated total of 25,537,691 (2018) residents.


Reference

  1. Lawrence, Marc. "Filipino Weapons from A-Z" (PDF). Steven K. Dowrd. Retrieved 26 September 2019.


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