Sviatoslav Olgovich

Last updated

Sviatoslav Olgovich (Russian : Святослав Ольгович; died February 14, 1164) was the Prince of Novgorod (1136–1138); Novgorod-Seversky (1139); Belgorod Kievsky (1141–1154); and Chernigov (1154–1164). He was the son of Oleg Sviatoslavich, Prince of Chernigov with an unnamed daughter of Asaduk, Khan of Khumans.

Russian language East Slavic language

Russian is an East Slavic language, which is official in the Russian Federation, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, as well as being widely used throughout Eastern Europe, the Baltic states, the Caucasus and Central Asia. It was the de facto language of the Soviet Union until its dissolution on 25 December 1991. Although, nowadays, nearly three decades after the breakup of the Soviet Union, Russian is used in official capacity or in public life in all the post-Soviet nation-states, as well as in Israel and Mongolia, the rise of state-specific varieties of this language tends to be strongly denied in Russia, in line with the Russian World ideology.

The Prince of Novgorod was the chief executive of Novgorod the Great. The office was originally an appointed one until the late eleventh or early twelfth century, then became something of an elective one until the fourteenth century, after which the Prince of Vladimir was almost invariably the Prince of Novgorod as well.

Belgorod Kievsky Ruined city-castle of Kievan Rus

Bilhorod Kyivsky was a legendary city-castle of Kievan Rus' that was located on the right bank of Irpin River and was mentioned in chronicles.

March to Chernigov; Sviatoslav Olgovich in his deathbed, with his wife and sons.jpg

After the death of their older brother, Vsevolod II, Sviatoslav and his brother Igor were driven out of Kiev by Iziaslav Mstislavich. Sviatoslav escaped, but Igor was captured and eventually killed in 1147. Sviatoslav fled to Chernigov but was ordered to relinquish his city, Novgorod-Seversky, to his cousins, Iziaslav Davidovich and Vladimir Davidovich. With the assistance of his ally, Yuri Dolgoruki, and his father-in-law, Aepa Khan, Sviatoslav began a war against his cousins, but was forced to flee to Karachev. There on January 16, 1147, Sviatoslav defeated the Davidovichi brothers.

Vsevolod II of Kiev Ruler of Kievan Rus

Vsevolod II Olgovich was the Prince (Knyaz) of Chernigov (1127–1139) and Grand Prince of Kiev (1139–1146), son of Oleg Svyatoslavich, Prince of Chernigov.

Igor II of Kiev Russian prince

Igor II Olgovich , Prince of Chernigov and Grand Prince of Kiev (1146). Son of Oleg Svyatoslavich of Chernigov. Saint - feast day: 5 June.

Iziaslav II of Kiev Grand Prince of Kiev

Iziaslav II Mstislavich, was the oldest son of Mstislav Vladimirovich,, and Christina Ingesdotter of Sweden. He was baptized as Panteleimon. Izyaslav is considered to be progenitor of the Monomakhovychi Volhynian branch.

Family

In 1108, Sviatoslav married a Cuman princess, daughter of Aepa Khan, who gave him a daughter and a son, Oleg. In 1136 Svyatoslav married a second time, to a woman of Novgorod, who bore his famous son, Igor Sviatoslavich.

Related Research Articles

Vsevolod I of Kiev Ruler of Kievan Rus

Vsevolod I Yaroslavich, ruled as Grand Prince of Kiev from 1078 until his death.

Yuri Dolgorukiy Grand Prince of Kiev

Yuri I Vladimirovich, known under his soubriquet Yuri Dolgorukiy, was a Rurikid prince and founder of the city of Moscow. He reigned as Velikiy Kniaz of Kiev from September 1149 to April 1151 and then again from March 1155 to May 1157. Yuri played a key role in the transition of political power from Kiev to Suzdal following the death of his elder brother Mstislav the Great in 1132.

Iziaslav I of Kiev Grand Prince of Kiev

Iziaslav Yaroslavich Kniaz' (Prince) of Turov, Veliki Kniaz.

Sviatoslav II Iaroslavich or Sviatoslav II Yaroslavich was Grand Prince of Kiev between 1073 and 1077. He was born as a younger son of Grand Prince Yaroslav the Wise. His baptismal name was Nicholas.

Yaropolk II of Kiev Grand Prince of Kiev

Yaropolk II Vladimirovich, Prince of Pereyaslav (1114–1132), Velikiy Kniaz of Kiev (1132–1139), son of Vladimir II Monomakh and Gytha of Wessex. He fought in several campaigns against the Polovtsy (Cumans), once in 1103 and again in 1116.

Rostislav Mstislavich, Kniaz' (Prince) of Smolensk (1125–1160), Novgorod (1154) and Velikiy Kniaz of Kiev. He was the son of Mstislav I of Kiev and Christina Ingesdotter of Sweden.

Sviatoslav III Vsevolodovich, Prince of Turov, Vladimir and Volyn (1141–1146), Pinsk (1154), Novgorod-Seversky (1157–1164), Chernigov (1164–1177), Grand Prince of Kiev. He was the son of Vsevolod II Olgovich.

Oleg Svyatoslavich was a Rurikid prince whose equivocal adventures ignited political unrest in Kievan Rus' at the turn of the 11th and 12th centuries.

Sviatoslav or Svyatoslav is a Russian and Ukrainian given name of Slavic origin. Cognates include Svetoslav, Svatoslav, Świętosław, Svetislav. It has a Pre-Christian pagan character and means "one who worships the light". In Christian times the name's meaning started to be associated with the roots "sveat'" (holy) + "slava" (worship), to be explained as "One who worships the Holy". A diminutive form for Sviatoslav is Svetlyo (Bulgarian), Slava (Russian), Świętek (Polish), Slavik (Ukrainian). Its feminine form is Sviatoslava. The name may refer to:

The Grand Duchy of Ryazan existed from 1078 when it was separated from the Chernigov Principality as the provincial Murom Principality.

The Battle of Alta River was a 1068 clash on the Alta River between Cuman army on the one hand and Kievan Rus' forces of Grand Prince Iziaslav I of Kiev, Prince Sviatoslav of Chernigov, and Prince Vsevolod of Periaslavl on the other in which the Rus' forces were routed and fled back to Kiev and Chernigov in some disarray. The battle led to an uprising in Kiev that briefly deposed Grand Prince Iziaslav. That incident supposedly shows the power of the Kiev veche and how common people gathering influenced princely politics in Kievan Rus'

Prince of Novgorod-Seversk was the kniaz, the ruler or sub-ruler, of the Principality of Novgorod-Seversk. It may have been created in 1139, the date of one modern authority, and is most famous for Igor Sviatoslavich, hero of the Old Russian Tale of Igor's Campaign.

The Prince of Chernigov was the kniaz, the ruler or sub-ruler, of the Rus' Principality of Chernigov, a lordship which lasted four centuries straddling what are now parts of Ukraine, Belarus and the Russian Federation.

The Prince of Murom was the kniaz, the ruler or sub-ruler, of the Rus' Principality of Murom, a lordship based on the city of Murom, now in Vladimir Oblast, Russia.

The Principality of Murom was a medieval Rus' lordship based on the city of Murom, now in Vladimir Oblast, Russia. Murom lay in an area that was strongly Finno-Ugric for much of its medieval history, located in the homeland of the Muromians. It appears to have been an important Finnic settlement in the ninth-century, with an archaeologically noticeable Scandinavian presence from the tenth-century, as evidenced by Frankish swords, a tortoiseshell brooch and a sword chape.

Oleg III Svyatoslavich was a Rus' prince. His baptismal name was Feodosy. He was prince of Vshchizh, of Novgorod-Seversk (1200–1201), and of Chernigov (1201/1202–1204).

Yaroslav II Vsevolodovich was a Rus’ prince. He was prince of Ropesk, of Starodub (1166–1176), and of Chernigov (1176–1198). When he became a monk before his death, he took the name Vasily.

Vladimir III Svyatoslavich was a Rus' prince. His baptismal name was Boris. He was prince of Gomiy (1164-?), of Novgorod, of Karachev (1194–?), and probably of Novgorod-Seversk (1198–1200).

References