Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 1974

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Eurovision Song Contest 1974
CountryFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
National selection
Selection processMelodifestivalen 1974
Selection date(s)9 February 1974
Selected entrant ABBA
Selected song"Waterloo"
Selected songwriter(s)
Finals performance
Final result1st, 24 points
Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest
◄197319741975►

The Swedish national selection for the Eurovision Song Contest was called Melodifestivalen 1974. It was, by far, won by the group ABBA, consisting of Anni-Frid Lyngstad, Agnetha Fältskog, Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus. Their song was called "Waterloo", which was written by Björn and Benny. It was originally written in Swedish, but for the ESC final, it was translated into English, which the rules allowed the years 1973-1976.

Contents

ABBA was one of the favorites to win ESC, held in Brighton, United Kingdom. They sang as #08. In the voting, they received high points from the first jury to vote (Finland), but it was a close race until the second last jury, Switzerland, which gave Sweden enough points to practically secure victory. Sweden got a total of 24 points, compared to runner-up Italy's 18. [1] This was Sweden's first victory. In 2005, in the 50th anniversary show Congratulations , Waterloo was chosen the best Eurovision song ever.

Before Eurovision

Melodifestivalen 1974

Melodifestivalen 1974 (on-screen title Melodifestival 1974) was the selection for the 15th song to represent Sweden at the Eurovision Song Contest. It was the 14th time that this system of picking a song had been used. 10 songwriters were selected by SR for the competition. The final was presented by Johan Sandström and was broadcast on TV1 but was not broadcast on radio. ABBA went on to win that year's Eurovision Song Contest in Brighton, Sweden's first Eurovision win.

DrawArtistSongSongwriter(s)PlacePoints
1Lena Ericsson"En enda jord"Håkan Elmquist1853rd
2 Östen Warnerbring "En mysig vals" Bengt Hallberg, Östen Warnerbring 1010th
3Göran Fristorp"Jag minns dej nog" Georg Riedel, Stig Claesson 167th
4 Titti Sjöblom "Fröken Ur sång" Torgny Söderberg 1484th
5 ABBA "Waterloo" Benny Andersson, Björn Ulvaeus, Stig Anderson 3021st
6 Lasse Berghagen "Min kärleksång till dig" Lasse Berghagen 2112nd
7Inger Öst"En grön dröm om dej"Bo Sylvén, Bo Carlgren, Bitte Carlgren615th
8 Sylvia Vrethammar and Göran Fristorp"En dröm är en dröm"Lars Färnlöf, Lasse Bagge316th
9Lena Bergqvist"Den sista sommaren av mitt liv" Björn Isfält, Lena Bergqvist119th
10Glenmarks"I annorlunda land" Bengt-Arne Wallin, Anja-Notini-Wallin158th

Voting

Song
Total score
Luleå
Falun
Karlstad
Gothenburg
Umeå
Örebro
Norrköping
Malmö
Sundsvall
Växjö
Stockholm
"En enda jord"185102015611103021152423
"En mysig vals"1050000004100
"Jag minns det nog"1670010200006
"Fröken Ur sång"14812181414142010127157
"Waterloo"3022627243541263416322417
"Min kärleksång till dej"2112621202517181214221818
"En grön dröm om dej"61219349411936
"En dröm är en dröm"3110050109348
"Den sista sommaren av mitt liv"1100203400002
"I annorlunda land"1513110003123

At Eurovision

Voting

Every country had a jury of ten people. Every jury member could give one point to his or her favourite song.

Congratulations: 50 Years of the Eurovision Song Contest

"Waterloo" was one of fourteen Eurovision songs chosen by fans to compete in the Congratulations 50th anniversary special in 2005. The contest was broadcast on SVT with commentary by Pekka Heino. It was the only Swedish entry featured in the show, although several Swedish entrants were featured (including Swedish winners Carola and Richard Herrey of Herreys). "Waterloo" appeared seventh in the running order, following "Nel blu dipinto di blu" by Domenico Modugno and preceding "Fly on the Wings of Love" by the Olsen Brothers. At the end of the first round, it was announced that "Waterloo" had advanced to the second round along with four other songs. It was later revealed that "Waterloo" won the first round with 331 points. This included 18 sets of the maximum twelve points, including from Sweden (who, unlike in usual contests, were allowed to vote for their own entry). Coincidentally, the first proper competing Eurovision song to receive a record 18 top marks was a Swedish entry: "Euphoria" by Loreen, the winning song of the 2012 contest.

"Waterloo" went on to win the second round and the anniversary contest as a whole, scoring 329 points.

Voting

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References

  1. "Final of Brighton 1974". Eurovision Song Contest. Archived from the original on 9 April 2021. Retrieved 9 April 2021.
  2. 1 2 "Results of the Final of Brighton 1974". Eurovision Song Contest. Archived from the original on 9 April 2021. Retrieved 9 April 2021.
  3. "Congratulations: Results from the voting (Round 1)" (PDF). Eurovision Song Contest. Archived from the original (PDF) on 25 May 2006. Retrieved 27 March 2021.
  4. "Congratulations: Results from the voting (Round 2)" (PDF). Eurovision Song Contest. Archived from the original (PDF) on 25 May 2006. Retrieved 27 March 2021.