Switzerland national football team

Last updated

Switzerland
Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg
Nickname(s) A-Team
Nati (National Team)
Rossocrociati (Red Crosses)
Association Swiss Football Association
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Murat Yakin
Captain Granit Xhaka
Most caps Granit Xhaka (123)
Top scorer Alexander Frei (42)
Home stadium Various
FIFA code SUI
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body sui24h.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts sui24h.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
First colours
Kit left arm sui24a.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body sui24a.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm sui24a.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks sui24a.png
Kit socks long.svg
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 19 Steady2.svg (4 April 2024) [1]
Highest3 (August 1993)
Lowest83 (December 1998)
First international
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg  France 1–0 Switzerland  Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg
(Paris, France; 12 February 1905)
Biggest win
Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg   Switzerland 9–0 Lithuania  Flag of Lithuania 1918-1940.svg
(Paris, France; 25 May 1924)
Biggest defeat
Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg   Switzerland 0–9 England  Flag of England.svg
(Basel, Switzerland; 20 May 1909)
Flag of Hungary (1848-1849, 1867-1869).svg  Hungary 9–0 Switzerland  Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg
(Budapest, Hungary; 29 October 1911)
World Cup
Appearances12 (first in 1934 )
Best resultQuarter-finals (1934, 1938, 1954)
European Championship
Appearances6 (first in 1996 )
Best resultQuarter-finals (2020)
Nations League Finals
Appearances1 (first in 2019 )
Best resultFourth place (2019)

The Switzerland national football team (German : Schweizer Fussballnationalmannschaft, Italian : Nazionale di calcio della Svizzera, French : Équipe nationale suisse de football, Romansh : Squadra naziunala da ballape da la Svizra) represents Switzerland in men's international football. The national team is controlled by the Swiss Football Association.

Contents

Switzerland's best performances at the FIFA World Cup have been three quarter-finals appearances, in 1934, 1938 and 1954. They hosted the competitions in 1954, where they played against Austria in the quarter-finals match, losing 7–5, which still stands as the highest scoring World Cup match ever. [2] At the 2006 FIFA World Cup, Switzerland set a FIFA World Cup record by being eliminated from the tournament despite not conceding a single goal, being eliminated by Ukraine after penalties in the round of sixteen. They did not concede a goal until a match against Chile at the 2010 FIFA World Cup, conceding in the 75th minute, setting a World Cup tournament record for consecutive minutes without conceding a goal. [3]

Switzerland and Austria were the co-hosts of UEFA Euro 2008, where the Swiss made their third appearance in the competitions, but failed for a third time to progress from the group stage. [4] [5] However, since then, the Swiss made it to the round of 16 during Euro 2016, and achieved a record-best quarter-finals showing at Euro 2020 after eliminating world champions France. [6] [7]

Overall, Switzerland's best ever result at an official football competitions was the silver medal they earned in 1924, after losing to Uruguay 3–0 in the finals of the 1924 Olympic Games. [8]

History

1924–1966: early years, World Cup host nation

The Uruguay v. Switzerland line-up in the Gold medal match at the 1924 Summer Olympics, held in Paris 1924-URU-SUI 1924-FIN-JO.svg
The Uruguay v. Switzerland line-up in the Gold medal match at the 1924 Summer Olympics, held in Paris

At the 1924 Paris Olympic Games, Switzerland finished with a silver medal after losing to Uruguay in the final, losing 3–0. [8] The team's debut appearance at the World Cup was in 1934, where they reached the quarter-finals after beating the Netherlands 3–2 in the round of sixteen before getting knocked out by Czechoslovakia. [9] [10] Switzerland once again reached the quarter-finals in 1938, after beating Germany in the round of sixteen, winning 4–2 after a replay but were knocked out by Hungary, losing 2–0. [11] [12] [13] At the 1950 World Cup, Switzerland were drawn in a group with Brazil, Yugoslavia and Mexico, where they lost 4–0 to Yugoslavia in the opening match, drew 2–2 with Brazil in their second match and beating Mexico 2–1 in their final group mach, and finished third in their group. [14] On 22 July 1946, Switzerland was awarded the right to host the 1954 World Cup unopposed, in Luxembourg City. [15] At the World Cup, Switzerland finished second in their group behind England; beating Italy and losing to England, [16] but qualified for the quarter-finals after beating Italy in a group play-off. [17] They were knocked out of the tournament after losing 7–5 to Austria. [18] At the 1962 World Cup, Switzerland finished bottom of the group, losing all three games, losing 3–1 to Chile, 2–1 to West Germany and 3–0 to Italy. [19] A similar result occurred at the 1966 World Cup, where Switzerland again finished at the bottom of their group losing all three of their matches, 5–0 to West Germany, 2–1 to Spain and 2–0 to Argentina. [20]

1992–1996: the Roy Hodgson era

In 1992, Switzerland appointed English manager Roy Hodgson as head coach of the national team; at the time of his appointment, the Swiss had not qualified for any major tournament since 1966. [21] Under his guidance, Switzerland rose to 3rd in the FIFA World Ranking in August 1993, which still remains their highest FIFA ranking to this day. [22] Hodgson led Switzerland to the 1994 FIFA World Cup, losing just one game during qualifying, in a group that included Italy, and much fancied Portugal, and Scotland.[ citation needed ] The Swiss won their home tie with Italy, and in the away game, took a 2–0 lead before being pegged back to a 2–2 draw, and also took four points from Scotland, winning 3–1 at home and drawing 1–1 away. [23] [24] [25] Against the Portuguese, Switzerland drew 1–1 at home and lost 1–0 in the away fixture in Porto, their only defeat of the qualifying campaign. [26] [27] Their opening match against hosts United States, on 18 June 1994, was played indoors at the Pontiac Silverdome in Detroit, and the two teams drew 1–1 in the opening match of the World Cup. [28] In the next match, they won 4–1 over Romania, and in their final game against Colombia, the Swiss lost 2–0. [29] [30] Nevertheless, Switzerland still qualified from the group, but were knocked out by Spain, losing 3–0. [31]

2000–2008: the Köbi Kuhn era

At UEFA Euro 1996, Switzerland once again easily qualified for the tournament hosted in England, as they topped their qualifying group, losing just once, which was a 1–2 defeat to Turkey. [32] [33] They were drawn in Group A, but their tournament was disappointing overall; as they finished bottom of the group. [34] Their opening match was against hosts England, and the two sides drew 1–1. [35] In their second match, they lost 2–0 to the Netherlands, and in their final group game, lost 1–0 to Scotland. [36] [37] Switzerland failed to qualify for the 1998 FIFA World Cup, hosted in France, as they finished fourth in their qualifying group, winning three games; 3–2 against Finland, 1–0 against Hungary and 5–0 against Azerbaijan, drawing one game against Hungary (1–1), and losing three games; 1–0 against Azerbaijan and losing both games against Norway, losing 1–0 at home and 5–0 away. [38]

In qualifying for UEFA Euro 2004, Switzerland finished top of a group that featured Russia, the Republic of Ireland, Albania and Georgia. [39] The Swiss finished with 21 points and qualified for the finals in Portugal, where they were drawn in Group B with defending champions France, England and Croatia. They began the tournament with a 0–0 draw with Croatia before succumbing to a 3–0 defeat to England in the next match. [40] [41] They lost their final match against France; losing 3–1 and finishing bottom of the group. [42] [43] Their only goal of the entire tournament was scored by Johan Vonlanthen, who became the youngest ever goalscorer at the Euros when he scored the equalizing goal against France; surpassing the previous record set only four days earlier by Wayne Rooney by three months. [44]

The Swiss managed to qualify for the 2006 FIFA World Cup, overcoming Turkey by the away goals rule in Istanbul, the country's first World Cup since 1994. [45] In the tournament, Switzerland was drawn in Group G with former world champions France, 2002 World Cup's fourth-place finisher South Korea and debutant Togo. In their first encounter, Switzerland bravely held the mighty France and Zinedine Zidane 0–0, [46] before overcoming the Togolese 2–0 in the second match, tied with the South Koreans four points, however the Swiss were inferior to the Koreans by number of goals scored, meaning that the last game a must-win. [47] The Swiss then managed to beat South Korea 2–0 in the final match, occupying first place in their group while knocking the Asians out of the tournament. [48] In the round of sixteen, Switzerland faced Ukraine, but lost on penalty shootout in a match that has been criticized as the worst game in World Cup history. [49] Yet, Switzerland was the only team to be eliminated without conceding a single goal.

Switzerland, along with Austria, were chosen as co-hosts of UEFA Euro 2008. [50] The Swiss were drawn in Group A with Portugal, Turkey and the Czech Republic. [4] Their opening match was a 1–0 loss to the Czech Republic, followed by a 1–2 defeat to Turkey. [51] [5] Their third match was against Portugal, with Switzerland winning 2–0 to ensure that Portugal would top their group with a defeat. [52]

2008–2014: the Ottmar Hitzfeld era

In their first match at the 2010 FIFA World Cup, the team defeated eventual champions Spain 1–0 with a goal by Gelson Fernandes, but they were still eliminated in the group stage. [53] In the second match, a goal scored by Mark González in the 75th minute of the game against Chile ended a 559-minute streak without conceding a goal in World Cup matches, beating the record previously held by Italy by nine minutes. [54] [55] [56] Switzerland did not advance further than the group after a 0–0 draw with Honduras in the third and final group match. [57]

The Switzerland national team line-up before a friendly match against Argentina, 29 February 2012. Switzerland lost 1-3. Swiss national football team - Swiss vs. Argentina, 29th February 2012.jpg
The Switzerland national team line-up before a friendly match against Argentina, 29 February 2012. Switzerland lost 1–3.

Switzerland did not qualify for UEFA Euro 2012; missing out on the tournament for the first time in a decade, as they finished third in the qualifying group, a group featuring England, Montenegro, Wales and Bulgaria. [59] Switzerland's initial start in qualifying was overall poor; losing 1–3 to England in the first game played, in which Xherdan Shaqiri scored his first goal for the national team, followed by a 1–0 defeat to Montenegro. [60] [61] Switzerland then recorded a 4–1 win over Wales before consecutive draws against Bulgaria (0–0) and England (2–2). [62] [63] [64] Switzerland's hopes of qualifying were restored with a 3–1 win over Bulgaria, with a hat-trick from Xherdan Shaqiri. [65] However, following a 2–0 loss to Wales (in which Reto Ziegler earned a red card) and Montenegro's surprising last-minute equalizer against England in a 2–2 draw, Switzerland's hopes of qualifying were mathematically made impossible. [66] [67] In the final game, Switzerland earned redemption against Montenegro as they came out with a 2–0 win. [68] Switzerland's top goalscorer during the qualifying period was Xherdan Shaqiri, with 4 goals. [69]

At the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil, Switzerland were drawn to play France, Honduras and Ecuador in the group stage. [70] They advanced to the round of sixteen with a 3–0 win over Honduras, with a hat-trick from Xherdan Shaqiri. In the knockout match against Argentina, they lost 1–0, conceding to Ángel Di María in the 118th minute. [71] [72]

2016–2021: the Vladimir Petković era

At Euro 2016, Switzerland were selected to play in Group A of the tournament; alongside hosts France, Albania and Romania.[ citation needed ] In the first game, Switzerland won 1–0 over Albania, with the only goal being scored by Fabian Schär in the fifth minute of the game. [73] The next match was a 1–1 draw with Romania, with Switzerland initially conceding from a penalty but equalizing in the second half following a goal from Admir Mehmedi. [74] The final group game was against France, drawing 0–0. However, the game spread notoriety for several Swiss players' jerseys being ripped during challenges with the French players, and also for the ball bursting during a challenge between Antoine Griezmann and Valon Behrami when they both converged on the ball, with the game also attracting attention for its poor surface, which was criticised by both coaches and players of the two teams; after the game, Switzerland's kit manufacturer had blamed "faulty material" for the incidents regarding the jerseys being ripped. [75] [76] [77] Switzerland, due to the draw, finished second in the group to set up a tie against Poland in the round of sixteen; initially the Swiss conceded but managed to find a late equalizer from Xherdan Shaqiri, who scored a bicycle-kick to send the game into extra-time, but the Swiss were knocked out as Granit Xhaka had missed the second penalty during the penalty shootout, as all other players managed to convert their penalties, with Poland winning 5–4 on penalties to go through and knock out the Swiss. [78] [79] [80] In qualifying for the 2018 FIFA World Cup, Switzerland were drawn with Portugal, Hungary, Faroe Islands, Latvia and Andorra. [81] The Swiss began their qualifying group with a shock 2–0 win over European champions Portugal, who had won the tournament less than two months prior to playing with them on 6 September. [82] Afterwards, they beat Hungary 2–3, Andorra 2–1, Faroe Islands 2–0, Latvia 1–0 in the first five games, leading the group on maximum points. [83] [84] [85] [86] In the reverse fixtures, they beat Faroe Islands 2–0, Andorra 3–0, Latvia 3–0 and Hungary 5–2, [87] [88] [89] [90] before facing Portugal in the final group game, where they lost 2–0, [91] meaning they would have to play in the play-offs; where they were ranked as the best second-placed team, [81] [92] and were drawn to play Northern Ireland. In the first leg, played on 9 November, they won 1–0 through a controversial penalty scored by Ricardo Rodríguez, and three days later played in the second leg, drawing 0–0 and advancing to the World Cup finals in Russia with a 1–0 aggregate win. [93] [94] [95] Before the World Cup, Switzerland were ranked 6th in the world ranking, even ranking higher than eventual World Cup winners France. [96]

The Switzerland national team line-up before the game against Sweden, on 3 July 2018, in Saint Petersburg Switzerland national football team World Cup 2018.jpg
The Switzerland national team line-up before the game against Sweden, on 3 July 2018, in Saint Petersburg

At the World Cup, Switzerland were drawn to play Brazil, Serbia and Costa Rica in Group E. [98] They began their campaign with a 1–1 draw with Brazil, [99] before beating Serbia 2–1 through a late winning goal from Xherdan Shaqiri. [100] The game with Serbia sparked controversy for the celebrations performed by goalscorers Xherdan Shaqiri and Granit Xhaka (both ethnic Albanians), along with Stephan Lichtsteiner as the trio performed a celebration where they crossed their hands to depict a double-headed eagle, the official emblem of Albania, considered by many as an Albanian nationalist symbol, however, they were not banned by FIFA for this. [101] [102] [103] [104] Their final group game was with Costa Rica; which they drew 2–2, with Blerim Džemaili and Josip Drmić scoring; thus finishing second in the group. [105] They were drawn to play Sweden in the round of sixteen, a fixture they lost 1–0, getting knocked out of the tournament. [106]

On 23 January 2018, Switzerland were selected to play in the inaugural edition of the UEFA Nations League, a tournament contested by all UEFA member's national teams, being drawn to play in League A, in Group 2, against Belgium and Iceland. [107] [108]

At Euro 2020, postponed to 2021 due to COVID-19, Switzerland finished third in Group A which contained Italy, Wales and Turkey; however, they managed to qualify to the knockout stage as one of the best third-placed teams. In the round of 16, they defeated World Cup champions France on penalties, after finishing 3–3 and overcoming a 1–3 second half deficit, to have their first knockout phase win in a major tournament since the 1938 World Cup. [109] [110] In the subsequent quarter-final game against Spain, they once again took the game to penalties, after trailing 1–0. However, after converting only one of their four penalties, they exited the tournament at this stage. [111]

2021–present: the Murat Yakin era

On 9 August 2021, Yakin became the manager of the Swiss national team. [112] During the 2022 World Cup qualification, Switzerland finished in the first place ahead of Italy in Group C, which granted them a spot in the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar. [113] During the World Cup, Switzerland finished second in Group G to qualify the round of 16, where they lost 6–1 to Portugal. [114] In 2023, Switzerland played against Romania, Israel, Belarus, Kosovo, and Andorra to qualify for Euro 2024. The Swiss finished second behind Romania. [115]

Team image

Kit

The Switzerland national team's traditional home kit is red shirts, white shorts and red socks, with the away kit being reverse with white shirts, red shorts and white socks, although the colours of the shorts and socks are interchangeable if there is a minor clash. Switzerland, since being established in 1895, have always had the same colour code, as tradition and homage to the national colours which are derived from the Swiss flag. The current kit manufacturer is Puma, who have made their kits since 1998.

Kit sponsorship

SupplierPeriod
Flag of France.svg Le Coq Sportif 1970–1975
Flag of Germany.svg Adidas 1976–1989
Flag of Austria.svg Blacky 1990–1992
Flag of Italy.svg Lotto 1992–1998
Flag of Germany.svg Puma 1998–present

Results and fixtures

The following is a list of match results in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

  Win  Draw  Loss  Fixture

2023

16 June 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Andorra  Flag of Andorra.svg1–2Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg   Switzerland Andorra la Vella, Andorra
20:45  UTC+2
  • Vieira Soccerball shade.svg67'
Report Stadium: Estadi Nacional
Attendance: 2,490
Referee: Balázs Berke (Hungary)
19 June 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Switzerland  Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg2–2Flag of Romania.svg  Romania Lucerne, Switzerland
20:45  UTC+2
Report
Stadium: Swissporarena
Attendance: 14,400
Referee: Daniele Orsato (Italy)
9 September 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Kosovo  Flag of Kosovo.svg2–2Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg   Switzerland Pristina, Kosovo
20:45  UTC+2
Report Stadium: Fadil Vokrri Stadium
Attendance: 12,700
Referee: Jakob Kehlet (Denmark)
12 September 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Switzerland  Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg3–0Flag of Andorra.svg  Andorra Sion, Switzerland
20:45  UTC+2
Report Stadium: Stade Tourbillon
Attendance: 9,000
Referee: Elchin Masiyev (Azerbaijan)
15 October 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Switzerland  Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg3–3Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus St. Gallen, Switzerland
18:00  UTC+2
Report Stadium: Kybunpark
Attendance: 17,000
Referee: João Pinheiro (Portugal)
15 November 2023 [note 1] UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Israel  Flag of Israel.svg1–1Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg   Switzerland Felcsút (Hungary) [note 2]
20:45  UTC+1 Report
Stadium: Pancho Aréna
Attendance: 2,024
Referee: Anthony Taylor (England)
18 November 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Switzerland  Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg1–1Flag of Kosovo.svg  Kosovo Basel, Switzerland
20:45  UTC+1
Report
Stadium: St. Jakob-Park
Attendance: 33,000
Referee: António Nobre (Portugal)
21 November 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Romania  Flag of Romania.svg1–0Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg   Switzerland Bucharest, Romania
21:45  UTC+2
Report Stadium: Arena Națională
Attendance: 50,224
Referee: Davide Massa (Italy)

2024

23 March 2024 Friendly Denmark  Flag of Denmark.svg0–0Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg   Switzerland Copenhagen, Denmark
20:00  UTC+1 Report Stadium: Parken Stadium
Attendance: 30,731
Referee: Allard Lindhout (Netherlands)
26 March 2024 Friendly Republic of Ireland  Flag of Ireland.svg0–1Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg   Switzerland Dublin, Ireland
19:45  UTC±0 Report
Stadium: Aviva Stadium
Referee: Paweł Raczkowski (Poland)
4 June 2024 Friendly Switzerland  Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svgvFlag of Estonia.svg  Estonia Lucerne, Switzerland
20:15  UTC+2 Stadium: Swissporarena
8 June 2024 Friendly Switzerland  Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svgvFlag of Austria.svg  Austria St. Gallen, Switzerland
18:00  UTC+2 Stadium: Kybunpark
15 June 2024 UEFA Euro 2024 Hungary  Flag of Hungary.svgvFlag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg   Switzerland Cologne, Germany
15:00  UTC+2 Report Stadium: RheinEnergieStadion
19 June 2024 UEFA Euro 2024 Scotland  Flag of Scotland.svgvFlag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg   Switzerland Cologne, Germany
21:00  UTC+2 Report Stadium: RheinEnergieStadion
23 June 2024 UEFA Euro 2024 Switzerland  Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svgvFlag of Germany.svg  Germany Frankfurt, Germany
21:00  UTC+2 Report Stadium: Waldstadion
5 September 2024 2024–25 UEFA Nations League Denmark  Flag of Denmark.svgvFlag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg   Switzerland Copenhagen, Denmark
20:45  UTC+2 Report Stadium: Parken Stadium
8 September 2024 2024–25 UEFA Nations League Switzerland  Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svgvFlag of Spain.svg  Spain Switzerland
20:45  UTC+2 Report Stadium: TBD
12 October 2024 2024–25 UEFA Nations League Serbia  Flag of Serbia.svgvFlag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg   Switzerland Serbia
20:45  UTC+2 Report Stadium: TBD
15 October 2024 2024–25 UEFA Nations League Switzerland  Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svgvFlag of Denmark.svg  Denmark Switzerland
20:45  UTC+2 Report Stadium: TBD
15 November 2024 2024–25 UEFA Nations League Switzerland  Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svgvFlag of Serbia.svg  Serbia Switzerland
20:45  UTC+1 Report Stadium: TBD
18 November 2024 2024–25 UEFA Nations League Spain  Flag of Spain.svgvFlag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg   Switzerland Spain
20:45  UTC+1 Report Stadium: TBD

Coaching staff

PositionName
Head coach Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Murat Yakin
Assistant coach Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Giorgio Contini [118]
Goalkeeping coach Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Patrick Foletti
Fitness coach Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Oliver Riedwyl
Doctor Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Ludwig Scholzer
Physiotherapist Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Marcel Müllenberger
Match analyst Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Kevin Ehmes
Masseur Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Wolfgang Frei
Nutritionist Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Antonio Molina
Chef Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Francesco Baraldo Sano
Team coordinator Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Diego Benaglio

Coaching history

As of 26 March 2024

Players

Current squad

The following squad was named for friendly matches against Denmark and the Republic of Ireland on 23 and 26 March 2024, respectively.

Caps and goals updated as of 26 March 2024, after the match against the Republic of Ireland. [119] [120]

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
11 GK Yann Sommer (3rd captain) (1988-12-17) 17 December 1988 (age 35)880 Flag of Italy.svg Internazionale
121 GK Yvon Mvogo (1994-06-06) 6 June 1994 (age 29)80 Flag of France.svg Lorient
211 GK David von Ballmoos (1994-12-30) 30 December 1994 (age 29)00 Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Young Boys

22 DF Kevin Mbabu (1995-04-19) 19 April 1995 (age 29)240 Flag of Germany.svg FC Augsburg
32 DF Silvan Widmer (1993-03-05) 5 March 1993 (age 31)413 Flag of Germany.svg Mainz 05
42 DF Nico Elvedi (1996-09-30) 30 September 1996 (age 27)511 Flag of Germany.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach
52 DF Manuel Akanji (1995-07-19) 19 July 1995 (age 28)583 Flag of England.svg Manchester City
132 DF Ricardo Rodriguez (1992-08-25) 25 August 1992 (age 31)1149 Flag of Italy.svg Torino
142 DF Ulisses Garcia (1996-01-11) 11 January 1996 (age 28)70 Flag of France.svg Marseille
152 DF Cédric Zesiger (1998-06-24) 24 June 1998 (age 25)30 Flag of Germany.svg VfL Wolfsburg
182 DF Eray Cömert (1998-02-04) 4 February 1998 (age 26)150 Flag of France.svg Nantes
222 DF Fabian Schär (1991-12-20) 20 December 1991 (age 32)808 Flag of England.svg Newcastle United
242 DF Bećir Omeragić (2002-01-20) 20 January 2002 (age 22)50 Flag of France.svg Montpellier

63 MF Denis Zakaria (1996-11-20) 20 November 1996 (age 27)543 Flag of France.svg Monaco
83 MF Remo Freuler (4th captain) (1992-04-15) 15 April 1992 (age 32)658 Flag of Italy.svg Bologna
103 MF Granit Xhaka (captain) (1992-09-27) 27 September 1992 (age 31)12314 Flag of Germany.svg Bayer Leverkusen
163 MF Uran Bislimi (1999-09-25) 25 September 1999 (age 24)10 Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Lugano
203 MF Michel Aebischer (1997-01-06) 6 January 1997 (age 27)180 Flag of Italy.svg Bologna
233 MF Xherdan Shaqiri (vice-captain) (1991-10-10) 10 October 1991 (age 32)12130 Flag of the United States.svg Chicago Fire
253 MF Vincent Sierro (1995-10-08) 8 October 1995 (age 28)10 Flag of France.svg Toulouse
263 MF Dereck Kutesa (1997-12-06) 6 December 1997 (age 26)10 Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Servette

74 FW Zeki Amdouni (2000-12-04) 4 December 2000 (age 23)136 Flag of England.svg Burnley
94 FW Noah Okafor (2000-05-24) 24 May 2000 (age 23)212 Flag of Italy.svg Milan
114 FW Renato Steffen (1991-11-03) 3 November 1991 (age 32)394 Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Lugano
174 FW Ruben Vargas (1998-08-05) 5 August 1998 (age 25)417 Flag of Germany.svg FC Augsburg
194 FW Dan Ndoye (2000-10-25) 25 October 2000 (age 23)90 Flag of Italy.svg Bologna

Recent call-ups

The following players have also been called up for the team in the last twelve months and are still available for a call up.

Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
GK Gregor Kobel (1997-12-06) 6 December 1997 (age 26)50 Flag of Germany.svg Borussia Dortmund v. Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark , 23 March 2024 INJ
GK Anthony Racioppi (1998-12-31) 31 December 1998 (age 25)00 Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Young Boys v. Flag of Romania.svg  Romania , 21 November 2023
GK Jonas Omlin (1994-01-10) 10 January 1994 (age 30)40 Flag of Germany.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach v. Flag of Israel.svg  Israel , 28 March 2023
GK Jérémy Frick (1993-03-08) 8 March 1993 (age 31)00 Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Servette v. Flag of Israel.svg  Israel , 28 March 2023

DF Loris Benito (1992-01-07) 7 January 1992 (age 32)131 Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Young Boys v. Flag of Romania.svg  Romania , 21 November 2023
DF Jordan Lotomba (1998-09-29) 29 September 1998 (age 25)71 Flag of France.svg Nice v. Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus , 15 October 2023
DF Michael Lang (1991-02-08) 8 February 1991 (age 33)313 Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Basel v. Flag of Israel.svg  Israel , 28 March 2023
DF Dominik Schmid (1998-03-10) 10 March 1998 (age 26)00 Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Basel v. Flag of Israel.svg  Israel , 28 March 2023

MF Filip Ugrinic (1999-01-05) 5 January 1999 (age 25)20 Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Young Boys v. Flag of Romania.svg  Romania , 21 November 2023
MF Edimilson Fernandes (1996-04-15) 15 April 1996 (age 28)302 Flag of Germany.svg Mainz 05 v.Flag of Israel.svg  Israel , 15 November 2023
MF Djibril Sow (1997-02-06) 6 February 1997 (age 27)410 Flag of Spain.svg Sevilla v. Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus , 15 October 2023
MF Ardon Jashari (2002-07-30) 30 July 2002 (age 21)20 Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Luzern v. Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus , 15 October 2023
MF Steven Zuber (1991-08-17) 17 August 1991 (age 32)5210 Flag of Greece.svg AEK Athens v. Flag of Romania.svg  Romania , 19 June 2023
MF Fabian Rieder (2002-02-16) 16 February 2002 (age 22)40 Flag of France.svg Rennes v. Flag of Israel.svg  Israel , 28 March 2023

FW Andi Zeqiri (1999-06-22) 22 June 1999 (age 24)110 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Genk v. Flag of Romania.svg  Romania , 21 November 2023
FW Cedric Itten (1996-12-27) 27 December 1996 (age 27)114 Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Young Boys v. Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus , 15 October 2023
FW Haris Seferovic (1992-02-22) 22 February 1992 (age 32)9325 Flag of the United Arab Emirates.svg Al Wasl v. Flag of Romania.svg  Romania , 19 June 2023
FW Breel Embolo (1997-02-14) 14 February 1997 (age 27)6313 Flag of France.svg Monaco v. Flag of Andorra.svg  Andorra , 16 June 2023 INJ

Notes
  • COV = Player withdrew from the squad due to testing positive for COVID-19.
  • INJ = Player withdrew from the squad due to an injury or illness.
  • PRE = Preliminary squad.
  • RET = Retired from international football.
  • SUS = Serving suspension.

Individual statistics

As of 26 March 2024. [121]
Players in bold are still active with Switzerland.

Most appearances

Granit Xhaka is Switzerland's most-capped player, with 123 appearances. SWE-SWI (18) (cropped).jpg
Granit Xhaka is Switzerland's most-capped player, with 123 appearances.
RankPlayerCapsGoalsCareer
1 Granit Xhaka 123142011–present
2 Xherdan Shaqiri 121302010–present
3 Heinz Hermann 118151978–1991
4 Ricardo Rodriguez 11492011–present
5 Alain Geiger 11221980–1996
6 Stephan Lichtsteiner 10882006–2019
7 Stéphane Chapuisat 103211989–2004
8 Johann Vogel 9421995–2007
9 Haris Seferovic 93252013–present
10 Gökhan Inler 8972006–2015

Top goalscorers

Alexander Frei is Switzerland's top scorer with 42 goals. Alex-frei-2011.jpg
Alexander Frei is Switzerland's top scorer with 42 goals.
RankPlayerGoalsCapsRatioCareer
1 Alexander Frei 42840.52001–2011
2 Kubilay Türkyilmaz 34640.531988–2001
Max Abegglen 34680.51922–1937
4 Xherdan Shaqiri 301210.252010–present
5 André Abegglen 29520.561927–1943
6 Jacques Fatton 28530.531946–1955
7 Adrian Knup 26490.531989–1996
8 Haris Seferovic 25930.272013–present
9 Josef Hügi 22340.651951–1961
Charles Antenen 22560.391948–1962

Competitive record

The best result Switzerland have achieved thus far is the quarter-finals of the World Cup on three occasions, in 1934, 1938 and 1954, while they also reached the same stage at Euro 2020. They earned a silver medal at the 1924 Olympic Games, held in Paris, where they lost 3–0 to Uruguay in the final. [122]

FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup record Qualification record
YearRoundPositionPldWDLGFGASquadPldWDLGFGA
Flag of Uruguay.svg 1930 Did not enterDeclined invitation
Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg 1934 Quarter-finals7th210155 Squad 202044
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg 1938 7th311155 Squad 110021
Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg 1950 Group stage6th311146 Squad 220084
Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg 1954 Quarter-finals8th42021111 Squad Qualified as hosts
Flag of Sweden.svg 1958 Did not qualify4013611
Flag of Chile.svg 1962 Group stage16th300328 Squad 54011110
Flag of England.svg 1966 16th300319 Squad 641173
Flag of Mexico.svg 1970 Did not qualify621358
Flag of Germany.svg 1974 622224
Flag of Argentina.svg 1978 410335
Flag of Spain.svg 1982 8233912
Flag of Mexico.svg 1986 8242510
Flag of Italy.svg 1990 82151014
Flag of the United States.svg 1994 Round of 1616th411257 Squad 10631236
Flag of France (lighter variant).svg 1998 Did not qualify83141112
Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg Flag of Japan.svg 2002 104241812
Flag of Germany.svg 2006 Round of 1610th422040 Squad 125612211
Flag of South Africa.svg 2010 Group stage19th311111 Squad 10631188
Flag of Brazil.svg 2014 Round of 1611th420277 Squad 10730176
Flag of Russia.svg 2018 14th412155 Squad 121011247
Flag of Qatar.svg 2022 12th420259 Squad 8530152
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Flag of Mexico.svg Flag of the United States.svg 2026 To be determinedTo be determined
Flag of Morocco.svg Flag of Portugal.svg Flag of Spain.svg 2030
Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg 2034
TotalQuarter-finals12/2241148195573140683735220150
* Draws include knockout matches decided via penalty shoot-out.
** Red border colour indicates that the tournament was held on home soil.

UEFA European Championship

UEFA European Championship record Qualifying record
YearRoundPositionPldWDLGFGASquadPldWDLGFGA
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg 1960 Did not enterDid not enter
Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg 1964 Did not qualify201124
Flag of Italy.svg 1968 62131713
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg 1972 6411125
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg 1976 6114510
Flag of Italy.svg 1980 8206718
Flag of France (lighter variant).svg 1984 622279
Flag of Germany.svg 1988 815299
Flag of Sweden.svg 1992 8422197
Flag of England.svg 1996 Group stage13th301214 Squad 8521157
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Flag of the Netherlands.svg 2000 Did not qualify842295
Flag of Portugal.svg 2004 Group stage15th301216 Squad 84311511
Flag of Austria.svg Flag of Switzerland (Pantone).svg 2008 9th310233 Squad Qualified as hosts
Flag of Poland.svg Flag of Ukraine.svg 2012 Did not qualify83231210
Flag of France (lighter variant).svg 2016 Round of 1611th413032 Squad 10703248
Flag of Europe.svg 2020 Quarter-finals7th513189 Squad 8521196
Flag of Germany.svg 2024 Qualified104512211
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Flag of Ireland.svg 2028 To be determinedTo be determined
Flag of Italy.svg Flag of Turkey.svg 2032
TotalQuarter-finals6/17183871624110482933194133
* Draws include knockout matches decided via penalty shoot-out.
** Red border colour indicates that the tournament was held on home soil.

UEFA Nations League

UEFA Nations League record
League phaseFinals
SeasonLGGrpPosPldWDLGFGAP/RRKYearPosPldWDLGFGASquad
2018–19 A 2 1st4301145Steady3.svg4th Flag of Portugal.svg 2019 4th201113 Squad
2020–21 A 4 3rd613298Steady3.svg11th Flag of Italy.svg 2021 Did not qualify
2022–23 A 2 3rd630369Steady3.svg9th Flag of the Netherlands.svg 2023
2024–25 A 4 To be determinedFlag of none.svg 2025 To be determined
Total1673629224thTotal201113
* Draws include knockout matches decided via penalty shoot-out.

Olympic Games

Olympic Games record
YearRoundPositionPldWDLGFGASquad
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg 1924 Silver medal2nd6411156 Squad
Flag of the Netherlands.svg 1928 Round of 1613th100104 Squad
Since 1992 See Switzerland national under-23 football team
Total74121510

Head-to-head record

As of 12 June 2022.

  Positive Record  Neutral Record  Negative Record

  1. Includes matches against Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia .
  2. Includes matches against Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany .
  3. Includes matches against Flag of Ireland.svg  Irish Free State .
  4. Includes matches against Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union .
  5. Includes matches against Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia and Flag of Yugoslavia (1992-2003); Flag of Serbia and Montenegro (2003-2006).svg  Serbia and Montenegro .

See also

Notes

  1. The Israel v Switzerland match, originally scheduled to be played at Bloomfield Stadium in Tel Aviv on 12 October 2023, was postponed to 15 November 2023 and relocated to a neutral site due to the Gaza−Israel conflict. [116]
  2. Due to the Gaza−Israel conflict, Israel play their remaining home matches at a neutral venue. [117]

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