Sydney Gardner

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Sydney Gardner
Sydney Gardner.jpg
Member of the Australian Parliament
for Robertson
In office
16 December 1922 21 September 1940
Preceded by William Fleming
Succeeded by Eric Spooner
Personal details
Born(1884-06-09)9 June 1884
Aberdeen, New South Wales
Died23 June 1965(1965-06-23) (aged 81)
NationalityAustralian
Political party Nationalist (1922–31)
UAP (1931–40)
OccupationFarmer

Sydney Lane Gardner (9 June 1884 – 23 June 1965) was an Australian politician. He was a member of the Australian House of Representatives from 1922 to 1940, representing the seat of Robertson for the Nationalist Party of Australia (1922–1931) and United Australia Party (1931–1940).

Division of Robertson Australian federal electoral division

The Division of Robertson is an Australian electoral division in the state of New South Wales. The division was proclaimed in 1900, and was one of the original 65 divisions to be contested at the first federal election. The division was named after Sir John Robertson, the fifth Premier of New South Wales.

United Australia Party former Australian political party (1931-1945)

The United Australia Party (UAP) was an Australian political party that was founded in 1931 and dissolved in 1945. The party won four federal elections in that time, usually governing in coalition with the Country Party. It provided two Prime Ministers of Australia – Joseph Lyons (1932–1939) and Robert Menzies (1939–1941).

Gardner was born at Rouchel, near Aberdeen in the Hunter Valley, and was educated at Scone Grammar School and the University of Sydney. He worked as a teacher at Melville, Davis Creek, Ferndale and Stoney Creek schools between 1903 and 1908, when he resigned from the Education Department and returned to farming at his family's property, "Rose Vale". [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] He unsuccessfully sought Liberal Reform Party preselection for a 1910 state by-election, but instead was appointed as organising secretary of the party's Upper Hunter Electorate Council. [8] [9] [10] Gardner was made a justice of the peace in 1913. [11] He unsuccessfully contested Nationalist Party of Australia preselection for the 1919 federal election, again taking on an organiser role. [12] [13] He worked for the federal Department of Taxation for a period before passing his accountants' examination in 1921 and becoming an accountant at Singleton. [14] In public life, he was a member of both the Pastures Protection Board and the Public School Board. [15] [16] [17]

Aberdeen, New South Wales Town in New South Wales, Australia

Aberdeen is a small town in the upper Hunter Region of New South Wales, Australia, in Upper Hunter Shire. It is 12 kilometres north of Muswellbrook on the New England Highway.

Scone Grammar School

Scone Grammar School is a coeducational, independent, P–12, Anglican school, located in the town of Scone, New South Wales, in the Upper Hunter Valley region of Australia.

University of Sydney university in Sydney, Australia

The University of Sydney is an Australian public research university in Sydney, Australia. Founded in 1850, it is Australia's first university and is regarded as one of the world's leading universities. The university is colloquially known as one of Australia's sandstone universities. Its campus is ranked in the top 10 of the world's most beautiful universities by the British Daily Telegraph and The Huffington Post, spreading across the inner-city suburbs of Camperdown and Darlington. The university comprises 9 faculties and university schools, through which it offers bachelor, master and doctoral degrees.

In 1922, he was elected to the Australian House of Representatives as the Nationalist member for Robertson, defeating William Fleming, deputy leader of the Country Party. [7] He increased his majority to 9,000 votes in his re-election in 1925. [18] In 1931, the Nationalist Party became the United Australia Party (UAP), which Gardner joined. In parliament, he was a member of the Joint Committee on Public Accounts and was Government Whip and secretary to the United Australia Party caucus. [15] [19] He held Robertson until 1940, when he was defeated by rival UAP candidate and state UAP minister Eric Spooner after the party decided to endorse two candidates. [20] He returned to farming at Rose Vale after leaving politics. Gardner died in 1965. [16]

William Fleming (Australian politician) Australian politician

William Montgomerie Fleming was an Australian politician, who served in the Australian House of Representatives and the New South Wales Legislative Assembly.

Eric Spooner Australian politician

Eric Sydney Spooner was an Australian politician.

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References

  1. "Rouchel". The Scone Advocate . 23 October 1903. p. 3. Retrieved 6 January 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  2. "Rouchel". The Scone Advocate . 25 August 1905. p. 2. Retrieved 6 January 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  3. "Rouchel". The Scone Advocate . 26 June 1908. p. 2. Retrieved 6 January 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  4. "Davis Creek". The Scone Advocate . 14 August 1908. p. 2. Retrieved 6 January 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  5. "ROUCHEL". The Maitland Daily Mercury . 7128 (5674). 25 March 1912. p. 6. Retrieved 6 January 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  6. "Empire Day". The Scone Advocate . 30 May 1913. p. 2. Retrieved 6 January 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  7. 1 2 "MR. S. L. GARDNER". The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate . LXV (4075). 6 September 1934. p. 14. Retrieved 6 January 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  8. "GLEANINGS". Singleton Argus . 7 October 1909. p. 1. Retrieved 6 January 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  9. "THE—Wuswellbrook Chronicle". The Muswellbrook Chronicle . 26 (83). 5 February 1910. p. 2. Retrieved 6 January 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  10. "—THE—Muswellbrook Chronicle". The Muswellbrook Chronicle . 27 (16). 4 June 1910. p. 2. Retrieved 6 January 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  11. "JUSTICES OF THE PEACE". The Maitland Daily Mercury (13, 144). 1 May 1913. p. 5. Retrieved 6 January 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  12. "Upper Hunter Election". The Scone Advocate . 12 March 1918. p. 2. Retrieved 6 January 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  13. "THE POLITICAL SITUATION". The Scone Advocate . 27 January 1920. p. 2. Retrieved 6 January 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  14. "ACCOUNTANTS' EXAMINATIONS". The Sydney Morning Herald (25, 934). 17 February 1921. p. 6. Retrieved 6 January 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  15. 1 2 "MR. S. L. GARDNER, M.P." The Gloucester Advocate . XXIV (2142). 12 October 1928. p. 4. Retrieved 6 January 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  16. 1 2 Carr, Adam (2008). "Australian Election Archive". Psephos, Adam Carr's Election Archive. Retrieved 25 May 2008.
  17. "UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY". The Sydney Morning Herald (20, 601). 18 March 1904. p. 3. Retrieved 6 January 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  18. "MR. S. L. GARDNER, M.P." The Muswellbrook Chronicle . 7 (82). 12 October 1928. p. 12. Retrieved 6 January 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  19. "MR. S. L. GARDNER". Windsor and Richmond Gazette . 46 (2370). 31 August 1934. p. 10. Retrieved 6 January 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  20. "The Muswellbrook Thronicle". The Muswellbrook Chronicle . 20 (68). 27 August 1940. p. 3. Retrieved 6 January 2017 via National Library of Australia.
Parliament of Australia
Preceded by
William Fleming
Member for Robertson
1922–1940
Succeeded by
Eric Spooner