Symptom of the Universe (song)

Last updated
"Symptom of the Universe"
Single by Black Sabbath
from the album Sabotage
A-side "Hard Road"
Released
  • July 28, 1975 (album)
  • October 1978 (single)
RecordedEarly 1975 at Morgan Studios in London, England, UK
Genre
Length6:29
Label
Songwriter(s)

"Symptom of the Universe" is a song by the heavy metal band Black Sabbath, from their 1975 album Sabotage . The song was an early influence on the development of thrash metal.

Contents

Overview

"Symptom of the Universe" was composed largely by guitarist Tony Iommi, with lyrics by Geezer Butler. Its closing passage, very unlike the rest of the song, evolved from an in-studio jam, created spontaneously in a single day. [1]

Live versions can be heard on the albums Past Lives , Cross Purposes Live and Live... Gathered in Their Masses , [2] as well as the Never Say Die! concert video. [3] It is also the opening track on Ozzy Osbourne's 1982 live album, Speak of the Devil .

The song is featured in the video games Skate 2 and Brütal Legend .[ citation needed ]

"Symptom of the Universe" was ranked the 19th best Black Sabbath song by Rock - Das Gesamtwerk der größten Rock-Acts im Check. [4]

Musical style

The main riff to "Symptom of the Universe" is considered to be a structural and sonic predecessor to thrash metal, [5] a heavy metal subgenre which emerged in the early 1980s. Tony Iommi said of the song "It starts with an acoustic bit. Then it goes into the up-tempo stuff to give it that dynamic, and it does have a lot of changes to it, including the jam at the end." [6]

Notable covers

Candlemass did a cover of this song on their 1988 album Ancien Dreams called Black Sabbath Medley

Personnel

Related Research Articles

"War Pigs" is a song by English heavy metal band Black Sabbath. It is the opening track from their 1970 album Paranoid.

<i>Sabotage</i> (Black Sabbath album) 1975 studio album by Black Sabbath

Sabotage is the sixth studio album by English rock band Black Sabbath, released in July 1975. It was recorded in the midst of litigation with their former manager Patrick Meehan and the stress that resulted from the band's ongoing legal woes infiltrated the recording process, inspiring the album's title. It was co-produced by guitarist Tony Iommi and Mike Butcher.

<i>Vol. 4</i> (Black Sabbath album) 1972 studio album by Black Sabbath

Vol. 4 is the fourth studio album by English rock band Black Sabbath, released in September 1972. It was the first album by Black Sabbath not produced by Rodger Bain; guitarist Tony Iommi assumed production duties. Patrick Meehan, the band's then-manager, was listed as co-producer, though his actual involvement in the album's production was minimal.

Iron Man (song) song by Black Sabbath

"Iron Man" is a song written and performed by the English heavy metal band Black Sabbath, released on their 1970 album Paranoid. The lyrics tell the story of a man who time travels into the future and sees the apocalypse. In the process of returning to the present, he is turned into steel by a magnetic storm. He is rendered mute, unable verbally to warn people of his vision of impending destruction. His attempts to communicate are ignored and mocked. This causes Iron Man to become furious, and drives his revenge on mankind, causing the apocalypse seen in his vision.

Paranoid (Black Sabbath song) song by Black Sabbath

"Paranoid" is a song by the British heavy metal band Black Sabbath, featured on their second album Paranoid (1970). It is the first single from the album, while the B-side is the song "The Wizard". It reached number 4 on the UK Singles Chart and number 61 on the Billboard Hot 100.

"N.I.B." is a song released by British rock band Black Sabbath. It first appeared as the fourth track on the band's 1970 debut album, Black Sabbath. The lyrics are in the first person from the point of view of Lucifer. Lyricist Geezer Butler has said that "the song was about the devil falling in love and totally changing, becoming a good person."

"Black Sabbath" is a song by the British heavy metal band Black Sabbath, written in 1969 and released on their self titled debut album. In 1970, it was released as a four-track 12-inch single, with "The Wizard" also on the A-side and "Evil Woman" and "Sleeping Village" on B-side, on the Philips Records label Vertigo. It is widely considered to be the first heavy metal song.

The Wizard (Black Sabbath song) song by Black Sabbath

"The Wizard" is a song by the British rock band Black Sabbath, taken from their 1970 album Black Sabbath. It is the second track on the record. The song was composed by all four members of the group and was produced by Rodger Bain. "The Wizard" was the B-side to the title track of the band's second album Paranoid.

"Sweet Leaf" is a song by Black Sabbath from their third studio album Master of Reality, released in 1971. It is considered as one of the band's signature songs. It was included on their initial greatest hits compilation We Sold Our Soul for Rock 'n' Roll (1976).

"Changes" is a song by Black Sabbath. It first appeared on Vol. 4 which was released in 1972.

<i>Symptom of the Universe: The Original Black Sabbath 1970–1978</i> 2002 greatest hits album by Black Sabbath

Symptom of the Universe: The Original Black Sabbath 1970–1978 is a compilation album released by heavy metal band Black Sabbath in 2002.

"Heaven and Hell" is the title track of Black Sabbath's ninth studio album. The music was written mainly by guitarist Tony Iommi, but – as with almost all Sabbath albums – credit is given to the entire band. The lyrics were written entirely by then newcomer Ronnie James Dio.

"Fairies Wear Boots" is a song by the English heavy metal band Black Sabbath, appearing on their 1970 album Paranoid. It was released in 1971 as the B-side to the single "After Forever".

Sabbath Bloody Sabbath (song) single

"Sabbath Bloody Sabbath" is the opening title track of British heavy metal band Black Sabbath's fifth album, released in 1973.

Children of the Grave song by Black Sabbath

"Children of the Grave" is a song by British heavy metal band Black Sabbath, from their 1971 album Master of Reality. The song lyrically continues with the same anti-war themes brought on by "War Pigs" and "Electric Funeral" from Paranoid, adding in Geezer Butler's pacifist ideals of non-violent civil disobedience. Two previously unreleased versions of this song are released on the deluxe edition of Master of Reality. The first is a version with alternate lyrics, the second an instrumental version.

"Children of the Sea" is a song by heavy metal band Black Sabbath, from their ninth studio album, Heaven and Hell (1980).

<i>The Collection</i> (Black Sabbath album) 1992 compilation album by Black Sabbath

The Collection is a compilation album released by English heavy metal band Black Sabbath in 1992. The album was released on the label Castle, who released two CD versions of this album in the UK, both with the same cover art and songs. The album includes greatest songs of Black Sabbath with Ozzy Osbourne prior to his dismissal in 1979, from the eponymous album to Never Say Die!. The album has 15 tracks, two from Black Sabbath, two from Paranoid, one from Master of Reality, two from Black Sabbath Vol. 4, two from Sabbath Bloody Sabbath, two from Sabotage, two from Technical Ecstasy and two from Never Say Die!.

<i>Stoneage</i> (Stone album) 1998 compilation album by Stone

Stoneage is a compilation album from Finnish thrash metal band Stone which was originally released in 1998. It was rereleased under the title Stoneage 2.0 in 2008, and included the bonus track "Symptom of the Universe", a Black Sabbath cover.

God Is Dead? single by Black Sabbath

"God Is Dead?" is a song by heavy metal band Black Sabbath featured on the album 13. It is the first single from the album, and the first with Ozzy Osbourne since 1998's "Psycho Man" and "Selling My Soul" from Reunion. The song was released via an MP3 download on Amazon. It was also available as a free download to those who pre-ordered the full album on iTunes. The song in its entirety was posted on the official YouTube channel in promotion of this. Both the song title and figure on the single's cover, by Heather Cassils, are a reference to Friedrich Nietzsche, a German philosopher who is famous for saying that "God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him. How shall we comfort ourselves, the murderers of all murderers?". It is Black Sabbath's longest song.

End of the Beginning (song) 2013 single by Black Sabbath

"End of the Beginning" is a song by English rock band Black Sabbath featured on the album 13. According to lyricist Geezer Butler, the song deals with the fear of how "technology is going to completely take over the human race", inspired particularly by cloning: "It seems like eventually, people are going to clone the Beatles and stuff like that. I mean, it’s already happening now with a "Tupac" at Coachella, using holograms. But eventually I think they’ll start cloning people like the Beatles, and sending them out on endless tours." Music Scholar and Black Sabbath fanatic, Nolan Stolz, notes that there are apparent similarities between "End of the Beginning" and "Black Sabbath", the first song off of the first album released by Black Sabbath. It is probable that this was an artistic statement signifying the band getting back to their roots.

References

  1. Iommi, Tony (2011). Iron Man: My Journey Through Heaven and Hell with Black Sabbath . Da Capo Press. ISBN   978-0-30681-9551.
  2. "Cross Purposes Live (Album) – Black Sabbath –". Last.fm. Retrieved 2014-05-19.
  3. "Black Sabbath: Never Say Die". Sanctuary Records Group. Archived from the original on 2006-09-29.
  4. Rehe, Christoph (2013). Rock - Das Gesamtwerk der größten Rock-Acts im Check: alle Alben, alle Songs. Ein eclipsed-Buch (in German). Sysyphus Sysyphus Verlags GmbH. ISBN   3868526463.
  5. Rakhmanin, Vladimir (September 22, 2012). "Thrash Metal – An Introduction". University Times Magazine. Retrieved September 6, 2013.
  6. Iommi, Tony (2012). Iron Man: My Journey Through Heaven and Hell with Black Sabbath . Simon & Schuster. p.  146. ISBN   0306822318.