Tāmaki Makaurau

Last updated
Tamaki Makaurau electorate boundaries used since the 2008 election Tamaki Makaurau electorate, 2014.svg
Tāmaki Makaurau electorate boundaries used since the 2008 election

Tāmaki Makaurau is a New Zealand parliamentary Māori electorate returning one Member of Parliament to the New Zealand House of Representatives. It was first formed for the 2002 election. The electorate covers the Auckland area and was first held by Labour's John Tamihere before going to Dr Pita Sharples of the Māori Party for three terms from 2005 to 2014. After Sharples' retirement, the electorate was won by Peeni Henare of the Labour Party in the 2014 election.

Contents

Population centres

In its current boundaries, Tāmaki Makaurau contains the Western Beaches of Waitakere City, all of West Auckland south of Te Atatu, the entire Auckland Isthmus, and the South Auckland suburbs of Mangere, Otara, Pakuranga and Manurewa. It does not contain Great Barrier or Rangitoto islands, as they are in Te Tai Tokerau; both Papakura and Waiheke Island are in Hauraki-Waikato. [1]

In the review of boundaries in 2007, the southern part of Manurewa shifted from Tāmaki Makaurau to the Hauraki-Waikato electorate. [2] The 2013/14 redistribution did not further alter the boundaries of the electorate. [3]

Tribal areas

The main iwi of Tāmaki Makaurau are Ngāti Whātua, Kawerau a Maki, Tainui, Ngāti Pāoa, Wai-O-Hua and Ngāti Rehua, [4] though a pan-Māori organisation called Ngāti Akarana exists for urbanised Māori with no knowledge of their actual iwi; and, through a population trend whereby many rural Māori moved to the cities, the largest iwi affiliation in the seat are Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Porou, Waikato and Ngāti Maniapoto, all iwi local to other areas of New Zealand. [5]

History

Tāmaki Makaurau derives its name from the Māori-language name for Auckland, meaning "Tāmaki desired by many", in reference to the desirability of its natural resources and geography. [6]

Tāmaki Makaurau was formed for the 2002 election from the northern part of the Hauraki electorate. John Tamihere of the Labour Party was the representative for Hauraki, and he also won the first election in the Tāmaki Makaurau electorate in 2002. Tamihere spent his six-year parliamentary career dogged by controversy that often overshadowed his work as a minister and, at the 2005 election came ten percent behind Māori Party co-leader Pita Sharples. Because Tamihere had chosen not to seek a list placing, his parliamentary career was terminated. Sharples remained the current representative for the electorate until his retirement, [7] when the Labour's Peeni Henare won the seat. [8]

Members of Parliament for Tāmaki Makaurau

Unless otherwise stated, all MPs terms began and ended at a general election.

Key

  Labour     Māori     Green   

ElectionWinner
2002 election John Tamihere
2005 election Pita Sharples
2008 election
2011 election
2014 election Peeni Henare
2017 election

List MPs from Tāmaki Makaurau

Members of Parliament elected from party lists in elections where that person also unsuccessfully contested the Tāmaki Makaurau electorate. Unless otherwise stated, all MPs terms began and ended at general elections.

ElectionWinner
2002 election Metiria Turei
2011 Louisa Wall 1
2011 election Shane Jones
2015 Marama Davidson 2
2017 election

1Wall was elected from the party list in April 2011 following the resignation of Darren Hughes.
2Davidson was elected from the party list in November 2015 following the resignation of Russel Norman.

Election results

2017 election

2017 general election: Tamaki Makaurau [9]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Peeni Henare 9,39647.51+10.0312,22059.34+18.59
Māori Shane Taurima5,58728.25-1.962,25810.96-1.76
Green Marama Davidson 4,26821.58+5.981,4907.24-4.45
NZ First  1,9639.53-4.45
National  1,3486.55-4.17
Opportunities  4772.32+2.32
Mana  3641.77-8.95
Legalise Cannabis  1530.74-0.22
ACT  320.16-0.03
People's Party  250.12+0.12
Conservative  240.12-0.49
Ban 1080  100.05+0.03
United Future  60.03-0.05
Outdoors  40.02+0.02
Democrats  30.01-
Internet  30.01+0.01
Informal votes526213
Total Valid votes19,77720,593
Labour holdMajority3,80919.26+11.99

2014 election

2014 general election: Tāmaki Makaurau [10]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Peeni Henare 7,53337.48+2.398,43240.45-1.05
Māori Rangi McLean6,07130.21-10.192,65112.72-2.73
Green Marama Davidson 3,13615.60+7.142,43811.69+1.98
Mana Kereama Pene2,62413.06-2.98
Independent Raewyn Harrison3171.58+1.58
NZ First  2,91413.98+3.53
Internet Mana  2,23410.72-2.96
National  1,5757.55-0.86
Legalise Cannabis  2000.96-0.10
Conservative  1280.61+0.11
ACT  390.19+0.04
United Future  160.08+0.03
Focus  60.03+0.03
Ban 1080  50.02+0.02
Independent Coalition  40.02+0.02
Democrats  10.005-0.005
Civilian  10.005+0.005
Informal votes417204
Total Valid votes20,09820,848
Labour gain from Māori Majority1,4627.27+1.96

2011 election

2011 general election: Tāmaki Makaurau [11]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Māori Green check.svgY Pita Sharples 7,12040.40-25.582,69414.45-14.16
Labour Shane Jones 6,18435.09+7.757,73941.50-8.23
Mana Kereama Pene2,82716.04+16.042,55113.68+13.68
Green Mikaere Curtis1,4918.46+3.691,8109.71+5.67
NZ First  1,94810.45+4.56
National  1,5698.41+1.00
Legalise Cannabis  1971.06-0.08
Conservative  940.50+0.50
ACT  280.15-0.53
United Future  100.05-0.08
Libertarianz  40.02+0.01
Alliance  20.01-0.01
Democrats  20.01+0.01
Informal votes717327
Total Valid votes17,62218,648
Māori holdMajority9365.31-33.33

Electorate (as at 26 November 2011): 35,347 [12]

2008 election

2008 general election: Tāmaki Makaurau [5] [13]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Māori Green check.svgY Pita Sharples 12,87665.98+13.635,80128.61+1.13
Labour Louisa Wall 5,33627.34-13.9010,08449.73-5.41
Green Mikaere Curtis9314.778194.04-2.55
Kiwi Vapi Kupenga1290.66280.14
Independent Kane Te Waaka1220.63
Independent Marama Nathan1200.61
National  1,5047.42+3.39
NZ First  1,1935.88+0.56
Family Party  2841.40
Legalise Cannabis  2301.13+0.42
ACT  1370.68+0.47
Bill and Ben  710.35
Progressive  380.19-0.15
Pacific  360.18
United Future  270.13-0.31
RAM  100.05
Workers Party  100.05
Alliance  50.02-0.05
Libertarianz  20.01-0.01
Democrats  00.00-0.01
RONZ  00.00-0.01
Informal votes480247
Total Valid votes19,51420,279
Turnout 20,82358.48-3.57
Māori holdMajority7,54038.64+27.53

2005 election

2005 general election: Tamaki Makaurau [14]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Māori Pita Sharples 10,02452.355,45727.48
Labour Red x.svgN John Tamihere 7,89741.24-32.1110,95155.14
Destiny Tauwehi Hemahema-Tāmati6753.535202.62
NZ First  1,0575.32
National  8014.03
Green  6523.28
Legalise Cannabis  1410.71
United Future  870.44
Progressive  670.34
ACT  420.21
Family Rights  200.10
Direct Democracy  180.09
Christian Heritage  140.07
Alliance  130.07
99 MP  90.05
One NZ  50.03
Libertarianz  30.02
Democrats  10.01
RONZ  10.01
Informal votes363199
Total Valid votes19,14719,859
Turnout 20,44062.05+7.83
Māori gain from Labour Majority2,12711.11

2002 election

2002 general election: Tamaki Makaurau [5]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour John Tamihere 11,44573.359,05255.97
Green Metiria Turei 2,00112.821,65910.26
National George Rongokino Ngatai7855.035163.19
Alliance Janice Smith5503.524702.91
Christian Heritage Tuhimareikura Vaha'akolo4723.022401.48
Progressive Sue Wharewhaka-Topia Watts3512.252281.41
NZ First  2,43015.03
Mana Māori  4642.87
Legalise Cannabis  4232.62
United Future  4112.54
ACT  2231.38
ORNZ  510.32
One NZ  40.02
NMP  20.01
Informal votes380122
Total Valid votes15,60416,173
Turnout 16,68854.22
Labour win new seatMajority9,44460.52

Related Research Articles

Tariana Turia New Zealand politician

Dame Tariana Turia is a New Zealand politician. She gained considerable prominence during the foreshore and seabed controversy, and eventually broke with her party as a result. She resigned from parliament, and successfully contested a by-election in her former electorate as a candidate of the newly formed Māori Party. She retired from Parliament in 2014.

Māori Party New Zealand political party promoting indigenous rights

The Māori Party is an indigenous rights-based centre-left political party in New Zealand. Tariana Turia founded the party in 2004 after resigning from the governing centre-left Labour Party, in which she was a minister, over the foreshore and seabed ownership controversy. She and Pita Sharples, a high-profile academic, became the first co-leaders.

Māori electorates

In New Zealand politics, Māori electorates, colloquially known as the Māori seats, are a special category of electorate that gives reserved positions to representatives of Māori in the New Zealand Parliament. Every area in New Zealand is covered by both a general and a Māori electorate; as of 2002, there are seven Māori electorates. Since 1967 candidates in Māori electorates have not needed to be Māori themselves, but to register as a voter in the Māori electorates people need to declare they are of Māori descent.

John Henry Tamihere is a New Zealand former politician, media personality, and political commentator. He was member of Parliament from 1999 to 2005. He served as a Cabinet minister in the Labour Party from August 2002 to 3 November 2004. He was intending to stand again for Parliament in the 2014 election, but decided not to. In January 2019, he announced his intention to stand for Auckland mayor in the 2019 election, which he lost to Phil Goff.

Ngāti Kahungunu Māori iwi (tribe) in Aotearoa New Zealand

Ngāti Kahungunu is a Māori iwi (tribe) located along the eastern coast of the North Island of New Zealand. The iwi is traditionally centred in the Hawke's Bay and Wairārapa regions.

Pita Sharples New Zealand politician

Sir Pita Russell Sharples is a New Zealand Māori academic and politician, who was a co-leader of the Māori Party from 2004 to 2013, and a minister outside Cabinet in the National Party-led government from 2008 to 2014. He was the member of Parliament for the Tāmaki Makaurau electorate in Auckland from 2005 to 2014. He stepped down as co-leader role of the Māori Party in July 2013.

Mangere Suburb in Auckland Council, New Zealand

Mangere, is one of the largest suburbs in Auckland, in northern New Zealand. It is located on mainly flat land on the northeastern shore of the Manukau Harbour, to the northwest of Manukau City Centre and 15 kilometres south of the Auckland city centre. It is the location of Auckland Airport, which lies close to the harbour's edge to the south of the suburb.

Māori politics Politics of the Māori people

Māori politics is the politics of the Māori people, who were the original inhabitants of New Zealand and who are now the country's largest minority. Before the arrival of Pākehā (Europeans) in New Zealand, Māori society was based largely around tribal units, and chiefs provided political leadership. With the British settlers of the 19th century came a new British-style government. From the outset, Māori sought representation within this government, seeing it as a vital way to promote their people's rights and improve living standards. Modern Māori politics can be seen as a subset of New Zealand politics in general, but has a number of distinguishing features. Many Māori politicians are members of major, historically European-dominated, political parties, but several Māori parties have been formed.

The Nga Iwi Morehu Movement was a New Zealand Māori political party. Its name literally translates as "the surviving people" or "the remnant people". It contested the 1996 election as an unregistered party, running a single candidate and gaining 194 votes. It ran two candidates in the 2002 election, winning 522 votes. In the 1999 election, members of Nga Iwi Morehu stood under the banner of the Freedom Movement.

Te Ururoa Flavell New Zealand politician

Te Ururoa James William Ben Flavell, also known as Hemi Flavell, is a New Zealand politician who has been a co-leader of the Māori Party since 2013 and represented the Waiariki electorate for the party in Parliament from 2005-2017.

Te Tai Tokerau Current New Zealand Māori electorate

Te Tai Tokerau is a New Zealand parliamentary Māori electorate that was created out of the Northern Maori electorate ahead of the first Mixed Member Proportional (MMP) election in 1996. It was first held by Tau Henare representing New Zealand First for one term, and then Dover Samuels of the Labour Party for two terms. From 2005 to 2014, it was held by MP Hone Harawira. Initially a member of the Māori Party, Harawira resigned from both the party and then Parliament, causing the 2011 by-election. He was returned under the Mana Party banner in July 2011 and confirmed at the November 2011 general election. In the 2014 election, he was beaten by Labour's Kelvin Davis, ending the representation of the Mana Party in Parliament.

Te Tai Tonga Māori electorate, returning one Member of Parliament to the New Zealand House of Representatives

Te Tai Tonga is a New Zealand parliamentary Māori electorate, returning one Member of Parliament to the New Zealand House of Representatives. The current MP for Te Tai Tonga is Rino Tirikatene of the Labour Party, who in 2011 defeated Rahui Katene of the Māori Party, who in turn had won the seat in 2008.

Waiariki (New Zealand electorate)

Waiariki is a New Zealand parliamentary Māori electorate that was first established for the 1999 election. Since the 2017 election, it has been held by former broadcaster Tamati Coffey after he defeated Te Ururoa Flavell.

Te Tai Hauāuru

Te Tai Hauāuru is a New Zealand parliamentary Māori electorate, returning one Member of Parliament to the New Zealand House of Representatives, that was first formed for the 1996 election. The electorate was represented by Tariana Turia from 2002 to 2014, first for the Labour Party and then for the Māori Party. Turia retired and was succeeded in 2014 by Labour's Adrian Rurawhe who again retained the seat in 2017.

Louisa Wall New Zealand Member of Parliament

Louisa Hareruia Wall is the New Zealand Member of Parliament for Manurewa, having stood for the New Zealand Labour Party. She has represented New Zealand in both netball as a Silver Fern and rugby union as a member of the Black Ferns.

Hauraki-Waikato

Hauraki-Waikato is a New Zealand parliamentary Māori electorate first established for the 2008 election. It largely replaced the Tainui electorate. Nanaia Mahuta of the Labour Party, formerly the MP for Tainui, became MP for Hauraki-Waikato in the 2008 general election and was re-elected in 2011, 2014 and 2017.

Ngāti Pāoa Māori iwi (tribe) in Aotearoa New Zealand

Ngāti Pāoa is a Māori iwi (tribe) of the Hauraki region of New Zealand. Its traditional lands stretch from the western side of the Hauraki Plains to Auckland. They also settled on Hauraki Gulf islands such as Waiheke.

Peeni Henare New Zealand politician

Peeni Ereatara Gladwyn Henare is a New Zealand Labour Party politician who has been a member of the New Zealand parliament for the Tāmaki Makaurau Māori electorate since the 2014 general election.

Hauraki was a New Zealand parliamentary Māori electorate returning one Member of Parliament to the New Zealand House of Representatives. It existed for one parliamentary term from 1999 to 2002, and was held by John Tamihere.

Te Ākitai Waiohua

Te Ākitai Waiohua is a Māori iwi of the southern part of the Auckland Region of New Zealand.

References

  1. "Find my Electorate". Electoral Commission . Retrieved 12 September 2014.
  2. Report of the Representation Commission 2007 (PDF). Representation Commission. 14 September 2007. p. 11. ISBN   978-0-477-10414-2 . Retrieved 2 October 2014.
  3. Report of the Representation Commission 2014 (PDF). Representation Commission. 4 April 2014. p. 11. ISBN   978-0-477-10414-2 . Retrieved 2 October 2014.
  4. "Tāmaki Makaurau". Te Puni Kōkiri. 6 March 2012. Retrieved 12 September 2014.
  5. 1 2 3 "Tāmaki Makaurau - Electorate Profile" (PDF). New Zealand Parliamentary Library. September 2012. Retrieved 12 September 2014.
  6. "About Auckland". The Auckland Plan 2050. Retrieved 3 January 2019.
  7. "Hon Dr Pita Sharples". New Zealand Parliament. 22 September 2014. Retrieved 2 October 2014.
  8. Ropiha, Billie Jo (20 September 2014). "Peeni Henare presents humble victory speech". Māori Television . Retrieved 2 October 2014.
  9. "Official Count Results -- Tamaki Makaurau". Wellington: New Zealand Electoral Commission. Retrieved 24 December 2017.
  10. "Official Count Results -- Tāmaki Makaurau". Electoral Commission. 10 October 2014. Retrieved 20 December 2016.
  11. "Official Count Results -- Tāmaki Makaurau". Electoral Commission. 10 December 2011. Retrieved 12 September 2014.
  12. "Enrolment statistics". Electoral Commission. 26 November 2011. Retrieved 27 November 2011.
  13. "Official Count Results -- Tāmaki Makaurau". Electoral Commission. 22 November 2008. Retrieved 12 September 2014.
  14. "Official Count Results -- Tāmaki Makaurau". Electoral Commission. 1 October 2005. Retrieved 12 September 2014.

Coordinates: 36°50′25″S174°44′24″E / 36.8404°S 174.7399°E / -36.8404; 174.7399