TR-1 Temp

Last updated
TR-1 Temp
SS-12 Scaleboard
9P120 Temp-s.jpg
9P120 launcher with 9M76 rocket of missile complex Temp-S
Type Theatre ballistic missile
Short-range ballistic missile
Place of originUSSR
Service history
In service1969 - 1989
Used by Soviet Armed Forces
Production history
Designer Nadiradze OKB
Manufacturer Votkinsk Machine Building Plant
Specifications
Mass9,700 kg (21,400 lb)
Length12.4 m (41 ft)
Diameter1.01 m (3 ft 4 in)
WarheadSingle 500  kt warhead

EngineSingle-stage liquid propellant
Operational
range
800 km (500 mi) (SS-12)
900 km (560 mi) (SS-22) [1]
Guidance
system
Inertial
Accuracy750 m (0.47 mi) CEP (SS-12)
370 m (0.23 mi) CEP (SS-22) [1]
Launch
platform
Road-mobile TEL
TransportRoad-mobile TEL

The TR-1 Temp (Russian : Темп-С, Temp-S, meaning "Speed") was a mobile theatre ballistic missile developed and deployed by the Soviet Union during the Cold War. It was assigned the NATO reporting name SS-12 Scaleboard and carried the industrial designation 9M76 and the GRAU index 9К76. A modified version was initially identified by NATO as a new design and given the SS-22 reporting name, but later recognized it as merely a variant of the original and maintained the name Scaleboard. The Temp entered service in the mid-1960s.

Contents

The TR-1 was designed as a mobile weapon to give theatre (Front) commanders nuclear strike capability. The weapon used the same mobile launcher (MAZ-543) as the R-17 Scud missile but had an environmental protective cover that split down the middle and was only opened when the missile was ready to fire. All were decommissioned in 1988–1989. [1]

Operators

Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
The Soviet Armed Forces were the only operator of the TR-1 Temp. It was also placed in countries of Warsaw Pact for example Hranice (39) in Czechoslovakia, and Königsbrück (19), Bischofswerda (8), Waren (22) and Wokuhl (5) in East Germany. [2] Its active reach from there covered whole West Germany, parts of Scandinavia, France and Netherlands.

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 TR-1 / SS-12 SCALEBOARD. Federation of American Scientists .
  2. "Treaty between the United States of America and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics on the Elimination of their Intermediate-Range and Shorter-Range Missiles - Memorandum of Understanding". State Department web site. Retrieved November 7, 2013.