Taiheiyo Cement

Last updated
Taiheiyo Cement Corporation
Type Public KK
TYO: 5233
FSE: 5233
Nikkei 225 Component
Industry Construction materials
Founded(May 1881;139 years ago (1881-05))
HeadquartersDaiba Garden City Building, 2-3-5, Daiba, Minato-ku, Tokyo 135-8578 Japan
Key people
Keiji Tokuue
(Chairman of the Board)
Shuji Fukuda
(President)
Products
RevenueIncrease2.svg US$ 8.16 billion (FY 2014) (¥ 840.28 billion) (FY 2014)
Increase2.svg US$ 342.27 million (FY 2014) (¥ 35.22 billion) (FY 2014)
Number of employees
13,087 (consolidated as of June 2014)
Website Official website
Footnotes /references
[1] [2] [3]

Taiheiyo Cement Corporation ("Pacific Ocean Cement Corporation") (太平洋セメント株式会社, Taiheiyō Semento Kabushiki-gaisha) is a Japanese cement company. It was formed in 1998 with the merger of Chichibu Onoda (itself a merger of Chichibu Cement and Onoda Cement) and Nihon Cement (formerly Asano Cement).

Contents

Business segments and products

The company is organized into the following business segments and products: [4]

In the U.S., the Federal Mine Safety and Health Administration's Data Retrieval System (DRS) shows Taiheiyo Cement Corp. controlling 29 facilities and mines under the jurisdiction of the Mine Safety and Health Administration. [5]

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References

  1. "Corporate Data". Taiheiyo Cement. Archived from the original on September 12, 2014. Retrieved September 11, 2014.
  2. "Consolidated Financial Results for Fiscal 2014" (PDF). Taiheiyo Cement. May 13, 2014. Retrieved September 11, 2014.
  3. "Company Summary". Google Finance . Retrieved September 11, 2014.
  4. "Company Snapshot". Bloomberg Businessweek . Retrieved September 11, 2014.
  5. Mine Safety and Health Administration