Taira no Munemori

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Taira no Munemori

Taira no Munemori(平 宗盛, 1147 – June 19, 1185) was heir to Taira no Kiyomori, and one of the Taira clan's chief commanders in the Genpei War.

Taira no Kiyomori Japanese samurai

Taira no Kiyomori was a military leader of the late Heian period of Japan. He established the first samurai-dominated administrative government in the history of Japan.

Genpei War conflict during late-Heian period of Japan

The Genpei War (1180–1185) was a national civil war between the Taira and Minamoto clans during the late-Heian period of Japan. It resulted in the downfall of the Taira and the establishment of the Kamakura shogunate under Minamoto no Yoritomo in 1192.

As his father Taira no Kiyomori lay on his deathbed, Kiyomori declared, among his last wishes, that all affairs of the clan be placed in Munemori's hands. His favorite, and eldest, son, Shigemori, had died, and so Munemori was next in line. [1]

Taira no Shigemori eldest son of the Taira clan patriarch, Taira no Kiyomori

Taira no Shigemori was the favorite son of the Taira clan patriarch, Taira no Kiyomori. He supported his father in the Heiji Rebellion. He died, "some said of grief at his father's stubborn and misguided treatment of his opponents." He was the ancestor of Oda Nobunaga by his grandson, Taira no Chikazane. His sons were Taira no Koremori and Taira no Sukemori.

In 1183, the rival Minamoto clan gained power, with Minamoto no Yoshinaka and Minamoto no Yukiie besieging the capital city. Following the defection of Emperor Go-Shirakawa to the Minamoto side, Munemori led his forces in escaping the capital city to the west, along with the young Emperor Antoku. [1] :293-294

Minamoto no Yoshinaka general

Minamoto no Yoshinaka, Kiso no Yoshinaka, or Lord Kiso was a general of the late Heian period of Japanese history. A member of the Minamoto samurai clan, Minamoto no Yoritomo was his cousin and rival during the Genpei War between the Minamoto and the Taira clans. He was born in Musashi province.

Minamoto no Yukiie One of the commanders of the Minamoto forces in the Genpei War

Minamoto no Yukiie was the brother of Minamoto no Yoshitomo, and one of the commanders of the Minamoto forces in the Genpei War at the end of the Heian period of Japanese history.

Emperor Go-Shirakawa Emperor of Japan

Emperor Go-Shirakawa was the 77th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. His reign spanned the years from 1155 through 1158, while he remained effectively in power for almost 37 years.

In September, the Taira established a temporary Court in Kyūshū and then Yashima. [1]

Takamatsu, Kagawa Core city in Shikoku, Japan

Takamatsu is a city located in central Kagawa Prefecture on the island of Shikoku in Japan, and is the capital city of the prefectural government. It is designated a core city by the Japanese Government. It is a port city located on the Seto Inland Sea, and is the closest port to Honshu from Shikoku island. For this reason it flourished under the daimyōs as a castle town in the fiefdom of Takamatsu, during the Edo period. Takamatsu is a city with a large concentration of nationwide companies' branch offices, which play a large role in its economy, and it contains most of the national government's branch offices for Shikoku. The castle tower formerly used as the symbol of the city was destroyed during the Meiji period. In 2004, construction of the Symbol Tower, the new symbol of Takamatsu, was completed. The Symbol Tower is located in the Sunport area of the city. The Symbol Tower is the tallest building in Takamatsu, and is right next to another tall building The JR Clement Hotel, which is also part of the Sunport complex.

Munemori took part in nearly every battle of the war, [2] and was captured at the Battle of Dan-no-ura, and executed in 1185. [1] :303,314

Battle of Dan-no-ura

The battle of Dan-no-ura was a major sea battle of the Genpei War, occurring at Dan-no-ura, in the Shimonoseki Strait off the southern tip of Honshū. On April 25, 1185, the fleet of the Minamoto clan (Genji), led by Minamoto no Yoshitsune, defeated the fleet of the Taira clan (Heike). The morning rip tide was an advantage to the Taira in the morning but turned to their disadvantage in the afternoon. The young Emperor Antoku was one of those who perished amongst the Taira nobles.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 Sansom, George (1958). A History of Japan to 1334. Stanford University Press. p. 287. ISBN   0804705232.
  2. The Tales of the Heike. Translated by Burton Watson. Columbia University Press. 2006. p. 122-123. ISBN   9780231138031.