Talladega, Alabama

Last updated
Talladega, Alabama
Talladega Alabama Courthouse Square.JPG
Talladega Courthouse Square Historic District
Talladega County Alabama Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Talladega Highlighted 0174592.svg
Location of Talladega in Talladega County, Alabama.
Coordinates: 33°26′5″N86°6′5″W / 33.43472°N 86.10139°W / 33.43472; -86.10139 Coordinates: 33°26′5″N86°6′5″W / 33.43472°N 86.10139°W / 33.43472; -86.10139
Country United States
State Alabama
County Talladega
Government
  MayorTimothy Ragland [1] [2] [3] [4]
Area
[5]
  Total26.13 sq mi (67.69 km2)
  Land26.05 sq mi (67.48 km2)
  Water0.08 sq mi (0.21 km2)
Elevation
558 ft (170 m)
Population
 (2020)
  Total15,861
  Density608.82/sq mi (235.06/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP codes
35160-35161
Area code(s) 256/938.
FIPS code 01-74592
GNIS feature ID0160707
Website www.talladega.com

Talladega ( /ˌtæləˈdɪɡə/ , also /ˌtæləˈdɡə/ ) [6] is the county seat of Talladega County, [7] Alabama, United States. It was incorporated in 1835. [8] At the 2020 census, the population was 15,861. Talladega is approximately 50 miles (80 km) east of one of the state’s biggest cities, Birmingham.

Contents

The city is home to the Alabama Institute for the Deaf and Blind and the Talladega Municipal Airport, a public general aviation airport. The Talladega Superspeedway, Talladega College and the International Motorsports Hall of Fame are located nearby. The First National Bank of Talladega (now First Bank of Alabama) is the oldest bank in the State of Alabama, being founded in 1848. [9]

Etymology

The name Talladega is derived from a Muscogee language, a Native American language of the Muscogee. It comes from the word Tvlvtēke, from Muscogee tvlwv, meaning "town", and vtēke, meaning "border", indicating its location on the border between Muscogee and Natchez. [10]

Geography

Talladega is located in east central Alabama at 33° 26′ 5″ N, 86° 6′ 5″ W (33.434722 N, -86.101389 W). [11] Alabama State Routes 21, 77, and 275 are the main routes through the city. AL-77 runs through the downtown area from north to south, leading north 14 mi (23 km) to Lincoln along Interstate 20 and southeast 24 mi (39 km) to Ashland. AL-21 runs from southwest to northeast through the city, leading northeast 23 mi (37 km) to Oxford and southwest 21 mi (34 km) to Sylacauga. AL-275 runs to the north and west of the city as a bypass of the downtown area.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 24.1 square miles (62.3 km2), of which 24.0 square miles (62.1 km2) is land and 0.077 square miles (0.2 km2), or 0.30%, is water. [12]

Climate

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Talladega has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps. [13]

The data below were accessed via the WRCC. They were compiled over the time period from 1888 to when this chart was created (July 2018). [14]

Talladega's record high of 109 °F (42.8 °C) occurred in September 1925 (Alabama's record high of 112 °F was recorded in Centreville that same month), July 1930, June 1931, and July 1933. The record low of -10 °F (-23.3 °C) occurred in February 1899. [14]

Climate data for Talladega, Alabama (1991–2020 normals, extremes 1893–present)
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)82
(28)
84
(29)
90
(32)
98
(37)
98
(37)
109
(43)
109
(43)
107
(42)
109
(43)
100
(38)
89
(32)
80
(27)
109
(43)
Average high °F (°C)54.2
(12.3)
58.5
(14.7)
66.7
(19.3)
74.8
(23.8)
81.9
(27.7)
87.9
(31.1)
90.8
(32.7)
90.1
(32.3)
85.6
(29.8)
75.7
(24.3)
64.9
(18.3)
56.7
(13.7)
74.0
(23.3)
Daily mean °F (°C)42.4
(5.8)
46.0
(7.8)
53.1
(11.7)
60.5
(15.8)
68.9
(20.5)
76.2
(24.6)
79.5
(26.4)
78.7
(25.9)
73.3
(22.9)
62.1
(16.7)
51.5
(10.8)
45.0
(7.2)
61.4
(16.3)
Average low °F (°C)30.6
(−0.8)
33.6
(0.9)
39.6
(4.2)
46.3
(7.9)
55.8
(13.2)
64.5
(18.1)
68.2
(20.1)
67.2
(19.6)
60.9
(16.1)
48.6
(9.2)
38.1
(3.4)
33.3
(0.7)
48.9
(9.4)
Record low °F (°C)−5
(−21)
−10
(−23)
6
(−14)
21
(−6)
32
(0)
39
(4)
48
(9)
46
(8)
35
(2)
23
(−5)
5
(−15)
0
(−18)
−10
(−23)
Average precipitation inches (mm)5.27
(134)
6.02
(153)
5.79
(147)
4.77
(121)
4.65
(118)
4.67
(119)
4.69
(119)
3.90
(99)
3.49
(89)
3.41
(87)
4.69
(119)
5.20
(132)
56.55
(1,436)
Average snowfall inches (cm)0.3
(0.76)
0.0
(0.0)
0.6
(1.5)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.9
(2.3)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in)10.29.910.08.78.610.110.69.26.56.47.410.9108.5
Source: NOAA [15] [16]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1850 1,320
1870 1,933
1880 1,233−36.2%
1890 2,06367.3%
1900 5,056145.1%
1910 5,85415.8%
1920 6,54611.8%
1930 7,59616.0%
1940 9,29822.4%
1950 13,13441.3%
1960 17,74235.1%
1970 17,662−0.5%
1980 19,1288.3%
1990 18,175−5.0%
2000 15,143−16.7%
2010 15,6763.5%
2020 15,8611.2%
U.S. Decennial Census [17]

2000 census

At the 2000 census, there were 15,143 people in 5,836 households, including 3,962 families, in the city. The population density was 634.4 inhabitants per square mile (244.9/km2). There were 6,457 housing units at an average density of 270.5 per square mile (104.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 56.15% White, 42.28% Black or African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.30% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.37% from other races, and 0.70% from two or more races. 0.90% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 5,836 households 30.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.7% were married couples living together, 19.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.1% were non-families. 29.5% of households were one person and 13.2% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 2.97.

The age distribution was 25.6% under the age of 18, 10.6% from 18 to 24, 25.2% from 25 to 44, 22.8% from 45 to 64, and 15.8% 65 or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 85.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 79.0 males.

The median household income was $29,617 and the median family income was $36,296. Males had a median income of $27,951 versus $21,326 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,733. About 14.1% of families and 19.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.4% of those under age 18 and 17.5% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

At the 2010 census, there were 15,676 people in 5,719 households, including 3,722 families, in the city. The population density was 653.2 inhabitants per square mile (252.2/km2). There were 6,611 housing units at an average density of 275.5 per square mile (106.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 48.7% Black or African American, 47.7% White, 0.3% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0% Pacific Islander, 1.6% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. 3.4% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 5,719 households 26.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.0% were married couples living together, 23.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.9% were non-families. 30.9% of households were one person and 12.0% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 2.96.

The age distribution was 23.2% under the age of 18, 10.8% from 18 to 24, 25.6% from 25 to 44, 25.9% from 45 to 64, and 14.5% 65 or older. The median age was 37.4 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 102.7 males.

The median household income was $32,449 and the median family income was $38,147. Males had a median income of $31,957 versus $24,209 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,146. About 22.7% of families and 25.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 38.8% of those under age 18 and 19.0% of those age 65 or over.

2020 census

Talladega racial composition [18]
RaceNum.Perc.
White (non-Hispanic)6,62041.74%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic)8,24752.0%
Native American 290.18%
Asian 750.47%
Pacific Islander 50.03%
Other/Mixed 4272.69%
Hispanic or Latino 4582.89%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 15,861 people, 5,553 households, and 3,334 families residing in the city.

Landmarks and places of interest

Talladega includes a number of properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places, including the J. L. M. Curry House and Swayne Hall, both listed as National Historic Landmarks. [19] [20] The main listed historic districts are the Silk Stocking District, which includes the Dr. Samuel Welch House, Talladega College Historic District, and Talladega Courthouse Square Historic District. [21] Also included is the Talladega Superspeedway, which is a 2.66 miles (4.28 km) long race track. It hosts two NASCAR races annually. In 2020, the Dr. William R. Harvey Museum of Art opened at Talladega College.

Education

Talladega County Schools is the local school district.

Alabama Institute for the Deaf and Blind, the statewide boarding school for the blind and deaf, is in Talladega, being established as a educational institution in 1858.

Notable people

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Clay County, Alabama</span> County in Alabama, United States

Clay County is a county in the east central part of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2020 census the population was 14,236. Its county seat is Ashland. Its name is in honor of Henry Clay, famous American statesman, member of the United States Senate from Kentucky and United States Secretary of State in the 19th century. It was the last dry county in Alabama with no wet cities within its boundaries, until a vote on March 1, 2016, approved the sale of alcohol in Lineville and Ashland.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Calhoun County, Alabama</span> County in Alabama, United States

Calhoun County is a county in the east central part of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2020 census, the population was 116,441. Its county seat is Anniston. It was named in honor of John C. Calhoun, noted politician and US Senator from South Carolina.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Cherokee County, Alabama</span> County in Alabama, United States

Cherokee County, Alabama is a county located in the northeastern part of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2020 census, the population was 24,971. Its county seat is Centre. The county is named for the Cherokee tribe.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Coosa County, Alabama</span> County in Alabama, United States

Coosa County is located in the east central portion of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2020 census the population was 10,387. Its county seat is Rockford. Its name derives from a town of the Creek tribe and the Coosa River, which forms one of the county borders.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Cullman County, Alabama</span> County in Alabama, United States

Cullman County is a county located in the north central portion of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2020 census, the population was 87,866. Its county seat and largest city is Cullman. Its name is in honor of Colonel John G. Cullmann.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Talladega County, Alabama</span> County in Alabama, United States

Talladega County is a county located in the east central portion of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2020 census, the population was 82,149. Its county seat is Talladega.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Muscogee County, Georgia</span> County in Georgia, United States

Muscogee County is a county located on the central western border of the U.S. state of Georgia; its western border with the state of Alabama is formed by the Chattahoochee River. As of the 2010 census, the population was 189,885. Its county seat and only city is Columbus, with which it has been a consolidated city-county since the beginning of 1971.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Centreville, Alabama</span> City in and county seat of Bibb County, Alabama

Centreville is a city in Bibb County, Alabama, United States. At the 2020 census, the population was 2,800. The city is the county seat of Bibb County.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Union Springs, Alabama</span> City in Alabama, United States

Union Springs is a city in and county seat of Bullock County, Alabama, United States. The population was 3,980 at the 2010 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Edwardsville, Alabama</span> Town in Alabama, United States

Edwardsville is a town in Cleburne County, Alabama, United States. At the 2020 census, the population was 206. From 1867 to 1906, it served as the Cleburne County Seat. In 1880 and 1890, it was the most populous community in the county. It reached its population zenith of 448 in 1900 when it fell behind Heflin, to which it also lost the county seat to six years later. It has not had more than 226 persons since 1920.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Brewton, Alabama</span> City in and county seat of Escambia County, Alabama

Brewton is a city in and the county seat of Escambia County, Alabama, United States. At the 2020 census, the population was 5,276. Brewton is located in south central Alabama, just north of the Florida Panhandle.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Boaz, Alabama</span> City in Alabama, United States

Boaz is a city in Marshall and Etowah counties in the U.S. state of Alabama. The Marshall County portion of the city is part of the Albertville Micropolitan Statistical Area. As of the 2020 census, the city's population was 10,107. Boaz was known for its outlet shops.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Greensboro, Alabama</span> City in Alabama, United States

Greensboro is a city in Hale County, Alabama, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 2,497, down from 2,731 at the 2000 census. The city is the county seat of Hale County, Alabama, which was not organized until 1867. It is part of the Tuscaloosa, Alabama Metropolitan Statistical Area.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Phenix City, Alabama</span> City in Alabama, United States

Phenix City is a city in Lee and Russell counties in the U.S. state of Alabama, and the county seat of Russell County. As of the 2020 Census, the population of the city was 38,816.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Smiths Station, Alabama</span> City in Alabama, United States

Smiths Station is a city in Lee County, Alabama. It is part of the Columbus metropolitan area, Georgia. At the time of the 2000 census, it was still a census-designated place (CDP), and its population was 6,756. The area that incorporated as Smiths Station in 2001 was much smaller than the CDP, and contained a population of 4,926 by the 2010 census. Smiths Station, known to locals as "Smiths", is a bedroom community of Columbus, Georgia and Phenix City, Alabama. Smiths Station High School has an enrollment of over 1,800 students and is the 11th-largest high school in the state.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Wedowee, Alabama</span> Town in Alabama, United States

Wedowee is a town in Randolph County, Alabama, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 823, up from 818 in 2000. The small town is the county seat of Randolph County. It was initially incorporated in 1836, but its charter lapsed by the late 19th century. It was reincorporated in 1901.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Childersburg, Alabama</span> City in Alabama, United States

Childersburg is a city in Talladega County in the U.S. state of Alabama. It was incorporated in 1889. At the 2020 census, the population was 4,754. It has a history dating back before 1540, when it was noted as a village of the Coosa Nation visited by the Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto. It is said a member of De Soto’s crew fell ill and was left to settle in the area of present day Childersburg where the Coosa people cared for the ill explorer. The Alabama Army Ammunition Plant, important during World War II, was located 4 miles (6 km) north of Childersburg.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lincoln, Alabama</span> City in Alabama, United States

Lincoln is a city in Talladega County, Alabama, United States. It was incorporated in 1911. At the 2020 census, the population was 6,845. It was named for Major General Benjamin Lincoln, who served in the American army during the Revolutionary War.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Talbotton, Georgia</span> City in Georgia, United States

Talbotton is a city in Talbot County, Georgia, United States. The population was 970 at the 2010 census. The city is the county seat of Talbot County.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bibb City, Georgia</span> Place in Georgia, United States

Bibb City is a former company town of the Bibb Manufacturing Company in Muscogee County, Georgia, United States. At the 2000 census, it had a total population of 510. The entire city area, consisting of historic Columbus Mill area and the associated mill village owned by the Bibb Manufacturing Company, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as Bibb City Historic District.

References

  1. "Talladega swears in first black mayor".
  2. "Talladega swears-in first African-American mayor". 4 November 2019.
  3. "HISTORY MADE!: Talladega elects its first African-American mayor (With photos) (Free content)".
  4. "Alabama Man, Tim Ragland, Makes Double History as Youngest and First Black Mayor of Talladega, Alabama". 9 October 2019.
  5. "2020 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  6. Daniel, Tom. "Pronouncing Talladega". Talladega is, and always has been, located in Alabama. There’s not another one. It was named by Alabamians based on a Creek Indian word that meant 'border town,' and has always been pronounced as TAL-uh-DIGG-uh by Alabamians. The town, everything in it, and everything around it is named 'Talladega' and is correctly pronounced TAL-uh-DIGG-uh.
  7. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  8. Herbert J. "Jim" Lewis, Birmingham, Alabama. "Talladega". Encyclopedia of Alabama. Retrieved 2016-07-25.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  9. "History of First Bank of Alabama". www.firstbankal.com. Retrieved 2022-11-06.
  10. Joel A. Nevis (2006). "From Arbacoochee to Yazoo: Conjuring Up Consonants In Muskogean Place-Names Of The South" (PDF). New York City. p. 8.
  11. "GeoHack - Talladega, Alabama".
  12. "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Talladega city, Alabama". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Archived from the original on February 12, 2020. Retrieved January 22, 2013.
  13. "Talladega, Alabama Köppen Climate Classification". Weatherbase.com. Retrieved 2016-07-25.
  14. 1 2 "TALLADEGA, ALABAMA - Climate Summary". wrcc.dri.edu. Retrieved 2018-07-21.
  15. "NowData – NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  16. "Station: Talladega, AL". U.S. Climate Normals 2020: U.S. Monthly Climate Normals (1991-2020). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  17. United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved November 20, 2013.
  18. "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved 2021-12-11.
  19. "Curry, J. L. M., Home". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Archived from the original on 2011-06-06. Retrieved 2011-04-12.
  20. "Swayne Hall, Talladega College". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Archived from the original on 2008-02-10. Retrieved 2007-10-25.
  21. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. January 23, 2007.
  22. "Alabama Governor William Woodward Brandon". National Governors Association. Retrieved Aug 29, 2013.