Te Atatū (New Zealand electorate)

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Te Atatu electorate boundaries used since the 2014 election Te Atatu electorate, 2014.svg
Te Atatū electorate boundaries used since the 2014 election

Te Atatū (before 2008 spelled Te Atatu, without a macron) is a parliamentary electorate, returning one Member of Parliament to the New Zealand House of Representatives. The current MP for Te Atatū is Phil Twyford of the Labour Party. [1]

A macron is a diacritical mark: it is a straight bar (¯) placed above a letter, usually a vowel. Its name derives from Greek, Modern μακρόν (makrón), meaning 'long', since it was originally used to mark long or heavy syllables in Greco-Roman metrics. It now more often marks a long vowel. In the International Phonetic Alphabet, the macron is used to indicate a mid-tone; the sign for a long vowel is instead a modified triangular colon ⟨ː⟩.

New Zealand electorates voting district for elections to the New Zealand Parliament

An electorate is a geographical constituency used for electing members to the New Zealand Parliament. In informal discussion, electorates are often called seats. The most formal description, electoral district, is used in legislation. The size of electorates is determined on a population basis such that all electorates have approximately the same population.

New Zealand House of Representatives Sole chamber of New Zealand Parliament

The New Zealand House of Representatives is a component of the New Zealand Parliament, along with the Sovereign. The House passes all laws, provides ministers to form a Cabinet, and supervises the work of the Government. It is also responsible for adopting the state's budgets and approving the state's accounts.

Contents

Population centres

The 1977 electoral redistribution was the most overtly political since the Representation Commission had been established through an amendment to the Representation Act in 1886, initiated by Muldoon's National Government. [2] As part of the 1976 census, a large number of people failed to fill in an electoral re-registration card, and census staff had not been given the authority to insist on the card being completed. This had little practical effect for people on the general roll, but it transferred Māori to the general roll if the card was not handed in. Together with a northward shift of New Zealand's population, this resulted in five new electorates having to be created in the upper part of the North Island. [3] The electoral redistribution was very disruptive, and 22 electorates were abolished, while 27 electorates were newly created (including Te Atatu) or re-established. These changes came into effect for the 1978 election. [4]

Robert Muldoon 31st Prime Minister of New Zealand

Sir Robert David Muldoon, also known as Rob Muldoon, was a New Zealand politician who served as the 31st Prime Minister of New Zealand, from 1975 to 1984, while Leader of the National Party.

Third National Government of New Zealand

The Third National Government of New Zealand was the government of New Zealand from 1975 to 1984. It was an economically and socially conservative government, which aimed to preserve the Keynesian economic system established by the First Labour government while also being socially conservative. Throughout its three terms it was led by Robert Muldoon, a populist but antagonistic politician who was sometimes described as his party's best asset and worst liability.

Māori people Indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand

The Māori are the indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand. Māori originated with settlers from eastern Polynesia, who arrived in New Zealand in several waves of canoe voyages some time between 1250 and 1300. Over several centuries in isolation, the Polynesian settlers developed a unique culture, with their own language, a rich mythology, and distinctive crafts and performing arts. Early Māori formed tribal groups based on eastern Polynesian social customs and organisation. Horticulture flourished using plants they introduced; later, a prominent warrior culture emerged.

Te Atatū comprises the suburbs of Waitakere City on the western side of the Whau River in Auckland. The main parts of the seat are the suburbs of Glendene, Te Atatu, Lincoln and Massey. Boundary changes in the leadup to the 2008 election have seen the northern boundary edge northwards to include Massey East, with a small southern block transferred to the neighbouring Waitakere seat.

Waitakere City human settlement

Waitakere City is a former territorial authority district in the west of Auckland, New Zealand, which was governed by the Waitakere City Council from 1989 to 2010. It was New Zealand's fifth largest city, with an annual growth of about 2%. In 2010 the council was amalgamated with other regional authorities into one new Auckland Council.

Whau River river in New Zealand

The Whau River is an estuarial arm of the southwestern Waitemata Harbour within the Auckland metropolitan area in New Zealand. It flows north for 5.7 kilometres (3.5 mi) from its origin at the confluence of the Avondale Stream and Whau Stream to its mouth between the Te Atatu peninsula and the long, thin Rosebank Peninsula in Avondale. It is 800 metres (2,600 ft) at its widest and 400 metres (1,300 ft) wide at its mouth.

Auckland Metropolitan area in North Island, New Zealand

Auckland is a city in the North Island of New Zealand. Auckland is the largest urban area in the country, with an urban population of around 1,628,900. It is located in the Auckland Region—the area governed by Auckland Council—which includes outlying rural areas and the islands of the Hauraki Gulf, resulting in a total population of 1,695,900. A diverse and multicultural city, Auckland is home to the largest Polynesian population in the world. The Māori-language name for Auckland is Tāmaki or Tāmaki-makau-rau, meaning "Tāmaki with a hundred lovers", in reference to the desirability of its fertile land at the hub of waterways in all directions.

The makeup of Te Atatū shows that while its population is composed roughly inline with the national average: It is roughly the same ages as the nation (with slightly more residents over fifty), and its average income ($22627) is only slightly lower than the rest of New Zealand. Its main point of demographic difference with its country is ethnic – it has more Asian New Zealanders and more Pacific Islanders than the rest of the country.

History

The Te Atatu electorate was created ahead of the 1978 election by pulling apart the seat of Waitemata; its first MP was future cabinet minister Dr Michael Bassett, who had been the MP for Waitemata from 1972 until 1975 before an anti-labour landslide cost him his job. Bassett held the seat until his retirement in 1990, when a toxic battle to succeed Bassett in an already lean year for Labour passed one of their safe seats into the hands of Brian Neeson. Neeson himself never represented the same seat twice in succession, (having jumped ship to Waitakere in 1993, Waipareia in 1996, to a new, larger Waitakere seat in 1999 before being denied the chance to contest Helensville in 2002), and his departure in 1993, coupled with a reversal of electoral fortune for the National Party (down from 47.8 to 35.1 percent) lead to a victory for incoming Labour MP Chris Carter. In his first three years in Parliament, Carter made news for being the first openly gay member of Parliament.

1978 New Zealand general election

The 1978 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to elect the 39th New Zealand Parliament. It saw the governing National Party, led by Robert Muldoon, retain office, but the opposition Labour Party won the largest share of the vote. Reorganisation of the enrolment system caused major problems with the electoral rolls, which left a legacy of unreliable information about voting levels in this election.

Waitemata was a New Zealand parliamentary electorate, from 1871 to 1946, and then from 1954 to 1978. It was represented by 18 members of parliament.

Michael Bassett New Zealand politician

Michael Edward Rainton Bassett is a former Labour Party member of the New Zealand House of Representatives and cabinet minister in the reformist fourth Labour government. He is also a noted New Zealand historian, and has published a number of books on New Zealand politics, including biographies of Prime Ministers Peter Fraser, Gordon Coates and Joseph Ward.

With the introduction of MMP voting in 1996, Te Atatū was scrapped in favour of a new seat called Waipareira, which covered the same area as Te Atatū, but also included the wealthy harbourside suburbs to the north of the seat. Neeson and Carter were rematched, when the presence of former Labour MP for West Auckland turned New Zealand First candidate Jack Elder, undermined Carter's chances and handed the seat to Neeson by fewer than a thousand votes.

The former New Zealand parliamentary electorate on the western inner city of Auckland, was known as City of Auckland West from 1861 to 1890, and then Auckland West from 1905 to 1946.

New Zealand First, commonly abbreviated to NZ First, is a nationalist and populist political party in New Zealand. It was founded in July 1993, following the resignation on 19 March 1993 of its leader and founder, Winston Peters, from the then-governing National Party. It has formed governments with both major parties in New Zealand: first with the National Party from 1996 to 1998, and then with the Labour Party from 2005 to 2008 and from 2017 to present.

Hon. Jack Arnold Elder is a New Zealand former politician. He was an MP from 1984 to 1999, representing the Labour Party, New Zealand First and Mauri Pacific.

Three years later, Te Atatu was re-established, with the new seat focused more on the working class suburbs at the southern end of Waitakere City and Carter had no such trouble using the seat to springboard back into Parliament. In 2002 and 2005, because the electoral climate favoured Labour, Carter and his party dominated the seat, winning at least 49 percent of the candidate and list vote, but the Labour vote was reduced in the 2008 election.

2002 New Zealand general election

The 2002 New Zealand general election was held on 27 July 2002 to determine the composition of the 47th New Zealand Parliament. It saw the reelection of Helen Clark's Labour Party government, as well as the worst-ever performance by the opposition National Party.

2005 New Zealand general election general election

The 2005 New Zealand general election on Saturday 17 September 2005 determined the membership of the 48th New Zealand Parliament. One hundred and twenty-one MPs were elected to the New Zealand House of Representatives: 69 from single-member electorates, including one overhang seat, and 52 from party lists.

2008 New Zealand general election election

The 2008 New Zealand general election was held on 8 November 2008 to determine the composition of the 49th New Zealand parliament. The conservative National Party, headed by its parliamentary leader John Key, won the largest share of votes and seats, ending nine years of government by the social-democratic Labour Party, led by Helen Clark. Key announced a week later that he would lead a National minority government with confidence-and-supply support from the ACT, United Future and Māori parties. The Governor-General swore Key in as New Zealand's 38th Prime Minister on 19 November 2008. This marked an end to nine years of Labour Party government, and the beginning of the Fifth National Government of New Zealand which would govern for 9 years, until its loss to the Labour Party in the 2017 general election.

Members of Parliament

Key

  Labour     National     Independent     Alliance   

ElectionWinner
1978 election Michael Bassett
1981 election
1984 election
1987 election
1990 election Brian Neeson
1993 election Chris Carter
(Electorate abolished 1996–1999, see Waipareira)
1999 election Chris Carter
2002 election
2005 election
2008 election
2011 election Phil Twyford
2014 election
2017 election

List MPs

Members of Parliament elected from party lists in elections since 1999 where that person also unsuccessfully contested the Te Atatū electorate. Unless otherwise stated, all MPs' terms began and ended at general elections.

ElectionWinner
1999 election Laila Harré
2005 election Tau Henare 1
2008 election
2011 election
2014 election Alfred Ngaro
2017 election
Golriz Ghahraman

Election results

2017 election

2017 general election: Te Atatu [5]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Phil Twyford 16,77415,40643.8
National Alfred Ngaro 13,59014,51441.2
NZ First David Wilson1,6092,256
Green Golriz Ghahraman 1,4131,715
ACT Stephen Fletcher240170
Conservative Marilyn Johnson164120
Independent Tua Schuster133
Opportunities  451
Māori  161
Legalise Cannabis  104
People's Party  42
United Future  25
Mana  15
Outdoors  15
Internet  14
Ban 1080  13
Democrats  8
Informal votes381170
Total Valid votes34,30435,199
Labour holdMajority3,184

2014 election

2014 general election: Te Atatū [6]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Phil Twyford 15,67648.11−5.7211,60334.81−4.10
National Alfred Ngaro 12,86339.48+4.0313,61440.84−0.35
Green Gary Stewart1,6184.97−0.952,6848.05+0.81
Conservative Paddy O'Rourke9652.96−0.791,2433.73+0.97
ACT Stephen Fletcher4161.28+0.234501.35+0.47
Legalise Cannabis Adrian McDermott3281.01+1.011220.37−0.18
Internet Chris Yong3000.92+0.92
NZ First  2,7848.35+1.60
Internet Mana  3801.14+1.14
Māori  1420.43−0.20
United Future  520.16−0.23
Ban 1080  120.04+0.04
Independent Coalition  120.04+0.04
Democrats  90.03−0.04
Civilian  50.01+0.01
Focus  00.000.00
Informal votes416223
Total Valid votes32,58233,335
Labour holdMajority2,8138.63−9.75

2011 election

2011 general election: Te Atatū [7]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Phil Twyford 15,86053.83+0.3911,99938.91-2.59
National Tau Henare 10,44435.45-0.7912,70141.19-0.35
Green Gary Stewart1,7445.92+2.662,2317.24+3.23
Conservative Cynthia Liu1,1063.75+3.758512.76+2.76
ACT Dominic Costello3081.05-1.852710.88-2.28
NZ First  2,0816.75+2.56
Māori  1930.63-0.21
Legalise Cannabis  1690.55+0.20
Mana  1590.52+0.52
United Future  1210.39-0.48
Alliance  240.08-0.01
Democrats  210.07+0.04
Libertarianz  140.05+0.02
Informal votes1,067356
Total Valid votes29,46230,835
Labour holdMajority5,41618.38+1.18

Electorate (as at 26 November 2011): 43,746 [8]

2008 election

2008 general election: Te Atatu [9]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Chris Carter 16,45953.4413,17141.50
National Tau Henare 11,16136.2413,18341.54
Green Xavier Goldie1,0033.261,2704.00
ACT Lech Beltowski8912.891,0023.16
Pacific Fiasili Jackueline Ah Tong4351.413621.14
Kiwi Jo van Kempen2600.841230.39
United Future Talei Solomon-Mua2500.812780.88
Progressive Pavitra Roy2440.792670.84
Alliance Bob van Ruyssevelt940.31270.09
NZ First  1,3284.18
Māori  2640.83
Bill and Ben  1800.57
Family Party  1340.42
Legalise Cannabis  1110.35
Workers Party  120.04
Democrats  80.03
Libertarianz  80.03
RAM  60.02
RONZ  40.01
Informal votes480174
Total Valid votes30,79731,738
Labour holdMajority5,29817.20

2005 election

2005 general election: Te Atatu [10]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Chris Carter 18,08759.37-3.1216,20952.03
National Tau Henare 7,64025.08+10.639,46630.38
NZ First Moetu Davis1,01611.141,8305.87
United Future Jo van Kemp8972.949563.07
Green Kath Dewar8492.791,0643.42
Māori Kelvin Martin2500.822190.70
Progressive Patriva Roy2260.743471.11
Christian Heritage Betty Jenkins2050.67970.31
Alliance Bob van Ruyssevelt1040.34240.08
Independent Adele Hughes860.28
Family Rights Stella Te Paeru Brown-Knowles770.251010.32
Direct Democracy Gregory Trichon560.18230.07
ACT  3791.03
Destiny  1070.29
Legalise Cannabis  520.17
One NZ  60.02
RONZ  60.02
Libertarianz  50.02
99 MP  40.01
Democrats  40.01
Informal votes370176
Total Valid votes30,46331,154
Labour holdMajority10,44734.29-13.75

2002 election

2002 general election: Te Atatu [11]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Chris Carter 16,82162.0314,12851.39
National Tau Henare 3,88914.343,59513.07
NZ First Christine Ritchie1,8116.672,95310.74
United Future Anne Drake1,5405.672,1007.63
ACT Ted Erskine-Legget8753.221,3815.02
Alliance Bob van Ruyssevelt6542.416182.24
Christian Heritage Matthew Flannagan5842.154731.72
Progressive Pasene Taulialo-O-Lilomaiava3651.344901.78
IndependentHelen Wiseman-Dare1970.72
Green  1,2484.54
ORNZ  1740.63
Legalise Cannabis  1320.48
One NZ  160.05
Mana Māori  80.02
NMP  30.01
Informal votes378169
Total Valid votes27,11427,488
Labour holdMajority12,93247.69

1999 election

Refer to Candidates in the New Zealand general election 1999 by electorate#Te Atatu for a list of candidates.

1993 election

1993 general election: Te Atatu [12]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Chris Carter 6,889 36.78
Alliance Laila Harré 5,50129.37
National Tracey Adams4,72425.22
NZ First Peter Brown1,1215.98
Christian Heritage Alan Broadbent3421.82
McGillicuddy Serious Aaron Lloyd Franklin890.47
Workers Rights Bill Bradford360.19
Natural Law Judith Ann Boock270.14
Majority1,3887.41
Turnout 18,72996.90+20.33
Registered electors 22,588

1990 election

1990 general election: Te Atatu [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
National Brian Neeson 8,662 44.75 +3.48
Labour Dan McCaffrey7,29237.67
Green Warwick Pudney1,6278.40
NewLabour Sue Pockett1,2776.59
Democrats Marilyn Jackson3231.66-3.13
McGillicuddy Serious Kit Boyes1290.66
Majority1,3707.07
Turnout 19,35576.57-7.30
Registered electors 25,277

1987 election

1987 general election: Te Atatu [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Michael Bassett 10,044 53.18 -1.38
National Brian Neeson 7,79541.27
Democrats Marilyn Jackson9064.79-0.72
NZ Party G M Oxton1400.74
Majority2,24911.90-13.34
Turnout 18,88583.87-6.17
Registered electors 22,516

1984 election

1984 general election: Te Atatu [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Michael Bassett 10,786 54.56 +6.17
National Francis William Gaucheron Diment5,79529.31
NZ Party Gray Phillips1,9729.97
Social Credit Marilyn Jackson1,0905.51
Independent G R Prout1260.63
Majority4,99125.24+6.57
Turnout 19,76990.04+3.85
Registered electors 21,954

1981 election

1981 general election: Te Atatu [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Michael Bassett 8,577 48.09 -0.90
National Stella Noble5,24729.42
Social Credit Rodney Wilson4,00922.48
Majority3,33018.67+2.69
Turnout 17,83386.19+16.18
Registered electors 20,688

1978 election

1978 general election: Te Atatu [14]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labour Michael Bassett 8,640 48.99
National W R Cross5,82133.01
Social Credit John Geoffrey Rawson2,92316.57
Values D C Bartle2501.41
Majority2,81915.98
Turnout 17,63470.01
Registered electors 25,186

Notes

  1. "New Zealand Parliament – Twyford, Phil". Parliament.nz. Retrieved 4 March 2014.
  2. McRobie 1989, pp. 8–9, 51, 119.
  3. McRobie 1989, p. 119.
  4. McRobie 1989, pp. 115–120.
  5. "Official Count Results – Te Atatu". Wellington: New Zealand Electoral Commission. Retrieved 23 December 2017.
  6. "Official Count Results – Te Atatū". Electionresults.govt.nz. 10 October 2014. Retrieved 18 December 2016.
  7. "Official Count Results – Te Atatū". Electionresults.govt.nz. Retrieved 4 March 2014.
  8. "Enrolment statistics". Electoral Commission. 26 November 2011. Retrieved 27 November 2011.
  9. "Official Count Results – Te Atatū". Electionresults.govt.nz. 22 November 2008. Retrieved 4 March 2014.
  10. "Official Count Results – Te Atatu". Electionresults.govt.nz. Retrieved 4 March 2014.
  11. Part 1: Votes recorded at each polling place (Technical report). New Zealand Chief Electoral Office. 1993. p. 114.
  12. Part 1: Votes recorded at each polling place (Technical report). New Zealand Chief Electoral Office. 1990. p. 118.
  13. 1 2 3 4 Norton 1988, p. 361.

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References