Ted Luscombe

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The Most Reverend

Lawrence Edward Luscombe

LL.D., Ph.D.
Bishop of Brechin
Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church
Church Scottish Episcopal Church
Diocese Brechin
In office1975–1990
Predecessor John Sprott
Successor Robert Halliday
Other posts Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church (1985-1990)
Orders
OrdinationMay 1964
by  John How
Consecration21 June 1975
by  Richard Wimbush
Personal details
Born (1924-11-10) 10 November 1924 (age 94)
Torquay, Devon, England
Nationality English
ParentsReginald John & Winifred Luscombe
Previous post Provost of St Paul's Cathedral, Dundee (1970–1975)
Education Torquay Boys' Grammar School
Alma mater King's College London
Kelham Theological College

Lawrence Edward "Ted" Luscombe (born 10 November 1924) is a British Anglican bishop and author. He was Bishop of Brechin from 1975 to 1990, and Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church from 1985 to 1990.

Bishop of Brechin Wikimedia list article

The Bishop of Brechin is the ecclesiastical head of the Diocese of Brechin or Angus, based at Dundee. Brechin Cathedral, Brechin is a parish church of the established (presbyterian) Church of Scotland. The diocese had a long-established Gaelic monastic community which survived into the 13th century. The clerical establishment may very well have traced their earlier origins from Abernethy. During the Scottish Reformation, the Presbyterian Church of Scotland gained control of the heritage and jurisdiction of the bishopric. However, the line of bishops has continued to this day, according to ancient models of consecration, in the Scottish Episcopal Church.

The Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church, styled "The Most Reverend the Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church", is the presiding bishop of the Scottish Episcopal Church. The current Primus is the Most Revd. Mark Strange who became primus on 27 June 2017.

The seven dioceses of the Scottish Episcopal Church make up the ecclesiastical province of the Anglican Communion in Scotland. The church has, since the 18th century, held an identity distinct from that of the Presbyterian-aligned Church of Scotland.

Contents

Early life and education

Luscombe was educated at Torquay Boys' Grammar School, an all-boys state grammar school in Torquay, Devon. He studied at King's College London and Kelham Theological College. [1]

Torquay Boys Grammar School Trust, selective academy in Torquay, Devon, England

Torquay Boys' Grammar School is a selective boys grammar school in Torquay, Devon, England. As of January 2012, it had 1,113 students. The school was founded in 1904 and celebrated its centenary in 2004. It has six houses named after famous British mariners.

State schools, called public schools in North America and many other countries, are generally primary or secondary schools mandated for or offered to all children without charge, funded in whole or in part by taxation.

Grammar school type of school in the United Kingdom and some other countries

A grammar school is one of several different types of school in the history of education in the United Kingdom and other English-speaking countries, originally a school teaching Latin, but more recently an academically-oriented secondary school, differentiated in recent years from less academic secondary modern schools.

Career

Early career

Luscombe served in the Indian Army between 1942 and 1945. [2] On 19 March 1944, he was granted an emergency commission as a second lieutenant. [3] On 1 August 1945, he transferred to the Devonshire Regiment of the British Army with the rank of war substantive lieutenant. [4]

Indian Army Land based branch of the Indian Armed Forces

The Indian Army is the land-based branch and the largest component of the Indian Armed Forces. The President of India is the Supreme Commander of the Indian Army, and it is commanded by the Chief of Army Staff (COAS), who is a four-star general. Two officers have been conferred with the rank of field marshal, a five-star rank, which is a ceremonial position of great honour. The Indian Army originated from the armies of the East India Company, which eventually became the British Indian Army, and the armies of the princely states, which finally became the national army after independence. The units and regiments of the Indian Army have diverse histories and have participated in a number of battles and campaigns across the world, earning many battle and theatre honours before and after Independence.

Second lieutenant is a junior commissioned officer military rank in many armed forces, comparable to NATO OF-1a rank.

Devonshire Regiment

The Devonshire Regiment was a line infantry regiment of the British Army which served under various titles and served in many wars and conflicts from 1685 to 1958, such as the Second Boer War, the First World War and the Second World War. In 1958 the regiment was amalgamated with the Dorset Regiment to form the Devonshire and Dorset Regiment which, in 2007, was amalgamated with the Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Regiment, the Royal Green Jackets and The Light Infantry to form a new large regiment, The Rifles.

Luscombe became an Associate of the Institute of Chartered Accountants (ACA) in 1952, [5] and worked as a chartered accountant until 1963. [1]

Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales organization

The Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW) is a professional membership organisation that promotes, develops and supports chartered accountants and students across the world. In 2019, it has over 181,000 members and students in 148 countries. In 2018, 8,821 students joined the ICAEW - the highest ever figure. The ICAEW was established by royal charter in 1880.

Chartered accountant occupation

Chartered accountants were the first accountants to form a professional accounting body, initially established in Scotland in 1854. The Edinburgh Society of Accountants (1854), the Glasgow Institute of Accountants and Actuaries (1854) and the Aberdeen Society of Accountants (1867) were each granted a royal charter almost from their inception. The title is an internationally recognised professional designation; the certified public accountant designation is generally equivalent to it. Women were able to become chartered accountants only following the Sex Disqualification (Removal) Act 1919 after which, in 1920, Mary Harris Smith was recognised by the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales and became the first woman chartered accountant in the world.

Ordained ministry

Luscombe was ordained in the Scottish Episcopal Church as a deacon in 1963 and as a priest, two years later in 1965. [5] His ecclesiastical career began as a Curate at St Margaret’s, Glasgow after which he was Rector of St Barnabas’, Paisley. [6] From 1970 to 1975, he was Provost of St Paul's Cathedral, Dundee. [5]

Curate person who is invested with the care or cure (cura) of souls of a parish

A curate is a person who is invested with the care or cure (cura) of souls of a parish. In this sense, "curate" correctly means a parish priest; but in English-speaking countries the term curate is commonly used to describe clergy who are assistants to the parish priest. The duties or office of a curate are called a curacy.

Glasgow City and council area in Scotland

Glasgow is the most populous city in Scotland, and the third most populous city in the United Kingdom, as of the 2017 estimated city population of 621,020. Historically part of Lanarkshire, the city now forms the Glasgow City council area, one of the 32 council areas of Scotland; the local authority is Glasgow City Council. Glasgow is situated on the River Clyde in the country's West Central Lowlands. It is the fifth most visited city in the UK.

A rector is, in an ecclesiastical sense, a cleric who functions as an administrative leader in some Christian denominations. In contrast, a vicar is also a cleric but functions as an assistant and representative of an administrative leader.

In 1975, Luscombe was consecrated a bishop, [5] and appointed the 50th Bishop of Brechin. [7] Ten years later he was additionally elected the Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church, a post he held until his retirement in 1990. [5]

Academic career

After retiring, he became an academic and author. He earned an MPhil and PhD research degrees from the University of Dundee where he remains an honorary Research Fellow in Modern History. [2]

Honours

In May 1981, Luscombe was appointed a Serving Brother of the Venerable Order of St John (SBStJ). [8] In January 1986, he was promoted to Officer of the Venerable Order of St John (OStJ). [9] In 1987, he was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws (LLD) by the University of Dundee. [5] [10]

Selected works

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References

  1. 1 2 Who's Who 2008: London, A & C Black, 2008 ISBN   978-0-7136-8555-8
  2. 1 2 "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 21 April 2013. Retrieved 8 November 2009.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. "No. 36641". The London Gazette . 4 August 1944. p. 3630.
  4. "No. 37239". The London Gazette (Supplement). 24 August 1945. p. 4324.
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Lawrence Edward Luscombe" . Crockford's Clerical Directory (online ed.). Church House Publishing . Retrieved 29 July 2016.
  6. "Scottish Episcopal Clergy, 1689-2000" Bertie, D.M: Edinburgh T & T Clark ISBN   0-567-08746-8
  7. "Diocese of Brechin". Archived from the original on 20 July 2011.
  8. "No. 48605". The London Gazette . 11 May 1981. pp. 6579–6580.
  9. "No. 50416". The London Gazette . 30 January 1986. pp. 6579–1373.
  10. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 11 September 2009. Retrieved 5 January 2010.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
Anglican Communion titles
Preceded by
John Sprott
Bishop of Brechin
19751990
Succeeded by
Robert Halliday
Preceded by
Alastair Haggart
Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church
19851990
Succeeded by
George Henderson