Ted Richmond

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Ted Richmond (June 10, 1910 December 23, 2013) was an American film producer credited with 66 films between 1940 and 1979. He was born in New Bedford, Massachusetts.

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Richmond produced films for several studios including Universal Pictures, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Columbia Pictures. His most noted films include Return of the Seven (1966; with Yul Brynner), Red Sun (1971; with Charles Bronson), and Papillon (1973; with Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman). He died in Paris at the age of 103 in 2013. [1]

Career

Richmond was born in New Bedford, Massachusetts. He first worked in the movie business as an usher at a local theater.[ citation needed ] He got into the film industry as an assistant director and providing stories at Monogram Studios. He eventually turned producer. In the mid 1940s he moved to Columbia Studios.[ citation needed ]

In the late 1940s he moved to Universal, where he produced the early starring vehicles for Audie Murphy. He made The Mississippi Gambler (1953) with Tyrone Power and the two men got along so well they decided to form a company together, Copa Productions. They made Count Three and Pray (1955) and Nightfall (1957) without Power in the cast, and Abandon Ship! (1957) and Solomon and Sheba (1959) with him. Power died during the filming of Solomon in Spain.[ citation needed ]

Richmond moved to MGM where he made Bachelor in Paradise (1961) and It Happened at the World's Fair (1963).

Richmond spent the last 30 years of his life in Paris with his wife, Asuko.[ citation needed ]

Partial filmography

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References

  1. Dagan, Carmel (2014-01-06). "Ted Richmond, Producer of 'Papillon,' Dies at 103". Variety . PMC . Retrieved 2013-01-11.
  2. Thomas, Bob (17 August 1967). "Producer Goes to Spain to Film Movie about Bandit Pancho Villa". The Times Tri-City Daily. p. 13. Retrieved 29 August 2013.