Ted St. Germaine

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Ted St. Germaine
Ted st. germaine.jpg
1922 photo of Jim Thorpe and Ted St. Germaine as teammates on the Oorang Indians football team
No. 24
Position: Tackle, center, guard
Personal information
Born:(1885-02-02)February 2, 1885
Lac du Flambeau, Wisconsin
Died: October 4, 1947(1947-10-04) (aged 62)
Lac du Flambeau, Wisconsin
Height: 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight: 250 lb (113 kg)
Career information
College: Yale
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Thomas Leo "Ted" St. Germaine (February 2, 1885 – October 4, 1947) was an American football player, coach, and lawyer. He served as the head football coach at Villanova College—now known as Villanova University—for one season, in 1913, compiling a record of 4–2–1. Germaine played professionally in the National Football League (NFL) during the 1922 season. That season, he joined the NFL's Oorang Indians, a team based in LaRue, Ohio, which was composed solely of Native Americans, and coached by Jim Thorpe. St, Germaine was qualified to play for the Indians since he was a Chippewa. [1]

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

Villanova University Catholic university near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Villanova University is a private research university in Radnor Township, Pennsylvania Named after Saint Thomas of Villanova, the school is the oldest Catholic university in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

National Football League Professional American football league

The National Football League (NFL) is a professional American football league consisting of 32 teams, divided equally between the National Football Conference (NFC) and the American Football Conference (AFC). The NFL is one of the four major professional sports leagues in North America, and the highest professional level of American football in the world. The NFL's 17-week regular season runs from early September to late December, with each team playing 16 games and having one bye week. Following the conclusion of the regular season, six teams from each conference advance to the playoffs, a single-elimination tournament culminating in the Super Bowl, which is usually held in the first Sunday in February, and is played between the champions of the NFC and AFC.

Germaine attended the University of Wisconsin, but found the atmosphere more friendly at Carlisle Indian Industrial School, located in Pennsylvania, where he played football and earned his bachelor's degree. He then furthered his education at Howard University and Yale Law School where, in 1913, he acquired a law degree. However even with a degree from Yale, St. Germaine knew that he was more likely to find a job on an Indian college coaching staff than in a white lawyer's office. He was recruited to play for the Oorang Indians, in 1922, at the age of 37, by Jim Thorpe. He is believed to have been the first attorney at law to play for an NFL team.

Carlisle Indian Industrial School former school in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, USA

The United States Indian Industrial School in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, generally known as Carlisle Indian Industrial School, was the flagship Indian boarding school in the United States from 1879 through 1918. All the school's property, known as the Carlisle Barracks, is now part of the U.S. Army War College.

Pennsylvania State of the United States of America

Pennsylvania, officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. The Appalachian Mountains run through its middle. The Commonwealth is bordered by Delaware to the southeast, Maryland to the south, West Virginia to the southwest, Ohio to the west, Lake Erie and the Canadian province of Ontario to the northwest, New York to the north, and New Jersey to the east.

Howard University university in Washington D.C.

Howard University is a private, federally chartered historically black university (HBCU) in Washington, D.C. It is categorized by the Carnegie Foundation as a research university with higher research activity and is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education.

After his football career ended, St. Germaine became a tribal judge and, in 1932, was the first Native-American admitted to the bar in Wisconsin. When President Franklin Roosevelt ended the Native-American assimilation policies, St. Germaine served as the spokesman for the Lac du Flambeau delegation at the Hayward, Wisconsin, hearings. At these hearings, St. Germaine argued for Indian self-government and tribal control of natural resources as stipulated in the treaties of the 19th century. Some of these concepts were incorporated into the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934. [2] Germaine died of a heart attack in 1947. [3]

A bar association is a professional association of lawyers. Some bar associations are responsible for the regulation of the legal profession in their jurisdiction; others are professional organizations dedicated to serving their members; in many cases, they are both. In many Commonwealth jurisdictions, the bar association comprises lawyers who are qualified as barristers or advocates in particular, versus solicitors. Membership in bar associations may be mandatory or optional for practicing attorneys, depending on jurisdiction.

Hayward, Wisconsin City in Wisconsin, United States

Hayward is a city in Sawyer County, Wisconsin, United States, next to the Namekagon River. The population was 2,318 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Sawyer County. The city is surrounded by the Town of Hayward.

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Villanova Wildcats (Independent)(1913)
1913 Villanova 4–2–1
Villanova:4–2–1
Total:4–2–1

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References

  1. Braunwart, Bob; Caroll, Bob; Horrigan, Joe (1981). "The Oorang Indians" (PDF). Coffin Corner. Pro Football Researchers Association. 3 (1): 17.
  2. "Lineman, Lawyer, Ojibwe". WisconsinPortal.org. Retrieved March 28, 2012.
  3. "Learn of Death of Thomas St. Germaine". Ironwood Daily Globe . Ironwood, Michigan. Associated Press. October 9, 1947. p. 12. Retrieved July 5, 2015 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .