Teepe Pillar

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Teepe Pillar
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Teepe Pillar
Location in Wyoming
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Teepe Pillar
Location in the United States
Highest point
Elevation 12,271 ft (3,740 m) [1]
Prominence 186 ft (57 m) [1]
Coordinates 43°44′09″N110°48′03″W / 43.73583°N 110.80083°W / 43.73583; -110.80083 Coordinates: 43°44′09″N110°48′03″W / 43.73583°N 110.80083°W / 43.73583; -110.80083 [1]
Geography
Location Grand Teton National Park, Teton County, Wyoming, U.S.
Parent range Teton Range
Topo map USGS Grand Teton
Climbing
First ascent 1930 by Robert Underhill & Kenneth Henderson [2]
Easiest route Technical, class 5.4 to 5.8

Teepe Pillar (12,271 feet (3,740 m)) is located in the Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, immediately south of Grand Teton. [3] The peak is the seventh highest in the Teton Range. Teepe Pillar is separated from Grand Teton by a col which drops sharply to the east and west. Northeast of and well below the summit, the Teepe Glacier is situated in a cirque. From Jackson Hole, Teepe Pillar is difficult to observe except from the northeast as it is hidden from view by Disappointment Peak.

Teton Range mountain range of the Rocky Mountains in North America

The Teton Range is a mountain range of the Rocky Mountains in North America. It extends for approximately 40 miles (64 km) in a north–south direction through the U.S. state of Wyoming, east of the Idaho state line. It is south of Yellowstone National Park and most of the east side of the range is within Grand Teton National Park.

Grand Teton National Park United States National Park in northwestern Wyoming

Grand Teton National Park is an American national park in northwestern Wyoming. At approximately 310,000 acres, the park includes the major peaks of the 40-mile-long (64 km) Teton Range as well as most of the northern sections of the valley known as Jackson Hole. Grand Teton National Park is only 10 miles (16 km) south of Yellowstone National Park, to which it is connected by the National Park Service-managed John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway. Along with surrounding national forests, these three protected areas constitute the almost 18,000,000-acre (7,300,000 ha) Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, one of the world's largest intact mid-latitude temperate ecosystems.

Wyoming State of the United States of America

Wyoming is a state in the mountain region of the western United States. The state is the 10th largest by area, the least populous, and the second most sparsely populated state in the country. Wyoming is bordered on the north by Montana, on the east by South Dakota and Nebraska, on the south by Colorado, on the southwest by Utah, and on the west by Idaho and Montana. The state population was estimated at 586,107 in 2015, which is less than 31 of the most populous U.S. cities including neighboring Denver. Cheyenne is the state capital and the most populous city, with an estimated population of 63,335 in 2015.

Best access to the summit is by way of Garnet Canyon to the Lower Saddle, a broad plateau which divides Grand Teton from Middle Teton. The summit is easiest to reach when approached from the west; however, true to its name, the pillar is a steep technical climb from every direction, involving up to 5 pitches at Class 5.4 to reach the summit.

Garnet Canyon

Garnet Canyon is located in Grand Teton National Park in the U.S. state of Wyoming. The canyon was formed by retreating glaciers which reached their last glacial maximum around 15,000 years ago. While Garnet Canyon is a less popular destination for recreational hikers than nearby Cascade Canyon or Death Canyon, it is an important approach to many significant and popular mountaineering climbs including routes found on Grand Teton, Middle Teton, South Teton and Disappointment Peak.

Middle Teton mountain in United States of America

Middle Teton is the third highest peak in the Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. The peak is immediately southwest of Grand Teton and the two are separated from one another by the lower saddle, a broad high ridge at 11,600 feet (3,540 m). The Middle Teton Glacier is located on the eastern slopes of the peak. Middle Teton is a classic pyramidal shaped alpine peak and is sometimes included as part of the Cathedral Group of high Teton peaks. The 40-mile (64 km) long Teton Range is the youngest mountain chain in the Rocky Mountains, and began their uplift 9 million years ago, during the Miocene. Several periods of glaciation have carved Middle Teton and the other peaks of the range into their current shapes. From the lower saddle, a distinctive feature known as the black dike appears as a straight line running from near the top of the mountain down 800 feet (240 m). The black dike is a basaltic intrusion that occurred long after the surrounding rock was formed.

The Yosemite Decimal System (YDS) is a three-part system used for rating the difficulty of walks, hikes, and climbs, primarily used by mountaineers in the United States and Canada. It was first devised by members of the Sierra Club in Southern California in the 1950s as a refinement of earlier systems, particularly those developed in Yosemite Valley, and quickly spread throughout North America.

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Mount Owen (Wyoming) mountain in Wyoming

Mount Owen is the second highest peak in the Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park in the U.S. state of Wyoming. The peak is named after William O. Owen, who organized the first documented ascent of the Grand Teton in 1898. Mount Owen is part of the Cathedral Group of high Teton peaks, a collection of peaks in the central section of the range that are particularly rugged. The 40-mile (64 km) long Teton Range is the youngest mountain chain in the Rocky Mountains, and began its uplift 9 million years ago, during the Miocene. Several periods of glaciation have carved Mount Owen and the other peaks of the range into their current shapes. Valhalla Canyon is situated on the west slopes of Mount Owen.

Teewinot Mountain mountain in United States of America

Teewinot Mountain is the sixth highest peak in the Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. The name of the mountain is derived from the Shoshone Native American word meaning "many pinnacles". The peak is northeast of the Grand Teton, and the two are separated from one another by the Teton Glacier and Mount Owen. Teewinot Mountain rises more than 5,500 feet (1,700 m) above Jenny Lake. The 40 miles (64 km) long Teton Range is the youngest mountain chain in the Rocky Mountains, and began their uplift 9 million years ago, during the Miocene. Several periods of glaciation have carved Teewinot Mountain and the other peaks of the range into their current shapes. Broken Falls is one of the tallest cascades in Grand Teton National Park and descends 300 feet (91 m) down the eastern slopes of Teewinot Mountain.

South Teton mountain in United States of America

South Teton is the fifth-highest peak in the Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, in the U.S. state of Wyoming. The peak is south of Middle Teton and just west of Cloudveil Dome and is part of the Cathedral Group of high Teton peaks. The 40-mile-long (64 km) Teton Range is the youngest mountain chain in the Rocky Mountains, and began their uplift 9 million years ago, during the Miocene. Several periods of glaciation have carved South Teton and the other peaks of the range into their current shapes.

Cathedral Group

The Cathedral Group is the group of the tallest mountains of the Teton Range, all of which are located in Grand Teton National Park in the U.S. state of Wyoming. The Cathedral Group are classic alpine peaks, with pyramidal shapes caused by glacial motion. The highest peak in the group is Grand Teton, which rises more than 7,000 feet (2,100 m) above Jackson Hole valley, and is the second tallest mountain in Wyoming, after Gannett Peak. The Cathedral Group is separated by other tall peaks of the range by the Cascade Canyon to the north and Avalanche Canyon to the south.

Signal Mountain (Wyoming) mountain in United States of America

Signal Mountain is an isolated summit standing 7,720 feet (2,350 m) above sea level. The mountain is located in Grand Teton National Park in the U.S. state of Wyoming. The next closest higher summit is more than 10 miles (16 km) distant, and this isolation provides sweeping views of the Teton Range, much of the northern Jackson Hole area as well as the Snake River. Though located adjacent to the Tetons, Signal Mountain was not formed in the same manner or period. The mountain originally was formed by volcanic ashfall from one of the eruptions of the Yellowstone hotspot. The peak is also partially a glacial moraine formed by a receding glacier that came south out of the Yellowstone icecap. This same glacier also created neighboring Jackson Lake.

Ranger Peak (Wyoming)

Ranger Peak is in the northern Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. The peak is located slightly northwest of and across Jackson Lake from Colter Bay Village. Colter Canyon is to the north while Waterfalls Canyon is immediately southeast of the peak, but there are no maintained trails in the area. Access to the summit involves off trail hiking and scrambling. The top of the mountain is more than 4,500 feet (1,400 m) above Jackson Lake.

Doane Peak mountain in United States of America

Doane Peak is in the northern Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. The peak is located west of and across Jackson Lake from Colter Bay Village. The scenic Waterfalls Canyon is immediately northeast of the peak, but there are no maintained trails in the area. Access to the summit involves off trail hiking and scrambling as the top of the mountain is more than 4,500 feet (1,400 m) above Jackson Lake. The peak is named for Lt. Gustavus Cheyney Doane.

Bivouac Peak mountain in United States of America

Bivouac Peak is in the northern Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. The peak is located immediately to the west of Moran Bay on Jackson Lake, and rises more than 4,000 ft (1,200 m) in less than 0.5 mi (0.80 km) from the lakeshore. Moran Canyon is situated to the south of the mountain and Snowshoe Canyon lies to the north.

Raynolds Peak mountain in United States of America

Raynolds Peak is in the northern Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. The mountain rises to the north of Moran Canyon and has numerous deep cirques on its north face above Snowshoe Canyon. There are no maintained trails in the region and the summit is 5 miles (8 km) west of Moran Bay on Jackson Lake. The peak is named after William F. Raynolds who was in charge of the 1859-1860 Raynolds Expedition to the region.

Disappointment Peak (Wyoming) mountain in United States of America

Disappointment Peak is in the Teton Range of Wyoming, in Grand Teton National Park and immediately southeast of Grand Teton. The peak is part of the Cathedral Group, a region of the Tetons noted for particularly rugged mountains. Disappointment Peak rises to the north of Garnet Canyon and to the west of Amphitheater and Surprise lakes. The peak has a variety of mountaineering routes, including the most difficult in the range.

Nez Perce Peak mountain in United States of America

Nez Perce Peak is located in the Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, immediately southeast of Grand Teton. The peak is in the central portions of the range, immediately east of Cloudveil Dome and is sometimes considered to be part of what is collectively known as the Cathedral Group. Nez Perce rises to the south of Garnet Canyon and is a dramatic peak that dominates the skyline to the west of Bradley and Taggart Lakes. When viewed from the western section of Jackson Hole, Nez Perce often obscures the view of Cloudveil Dome as well as South Teton, even though both summits are higher.

Buck Mountain (Wyoming) mountain in Wyoming

Buck Mountain 11,943 feet (3,640 m) is located in the Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, immediately southeast of Grand Teton. The mountain is the highest summit south of Garnet Canyon and is easily seen from most vantage points in Jackson Hole. Views from the summit offer excellent views of the Cathedral Group to the north. The west slope of the summit tower are along the Alaska Basin Trail and extend into Caribou-Targhee National Forest and the Jedediah Smith Wilderness, which is the location of Alaska Basin, a popular wilderness camping area for backpackers. Timberline Lake is located on the eastern flanks of the peak.

Forellen Peak mountain in United States of America

Forellen Peak is located in the Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, in the U.S. state of Wyoming. The peak is in the northern section of the range, and rises abruptly more than 2,500 feet (760 m) above Owl Creek. Unlike the more impressive sections of the Teton Range to the south, Forellen Peak is subdued and the hike to the summit from the north is nontechnical, yet requires many miles of off-trail hiking. Access is best via the Berry Creek trail which can be reached by hiking south from the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway or by boat across the northern end of Jackson Lake.

Mount Wister mountain in United States of America

Mount Wister is located in the Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, in the U.S. state of Wyoming. The peak is located 5 miles (8.0 km) west of Taggart Lake and to the south of Avalanche Canyon.

Static Peak mountain in United States of America

Static Peak is located in the Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, in the U.S. state of Wyoming. Located .48 miles (0.77 km) southeast of Buck Mountain, the summit is also east of the Alaska Basin Trail, from a point known as Static Peak Divide, the summit can be climbed in a scramble. Below the summit on the north face, a small remnant glacier persists, sheltered from direct sunlight by steep cliffs. Timberline Lake lies to the north of the peak.

Teepe Glacier glacier in the United States

Teepe Glacier is below the northeast face of Teepe Pillar in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, United States. The glacier is immediately southeast of Grand Teton in the heart of the Cathedral Group collection of high peaks in the Teton Range. Between 1967 and 2006, Teepe Glacier lost approximately 60 percent of its surface area, shrinking from 13 to 5 acres.

Garnet Canyon Trail

The Garnet Canyon Trail is a 4.8-mile (7.7 km) long hiking trail in Grand Teton National Park in the U.S. state of Wyoming. The trailhead is at the Lupine Meadows parking area and climbs steeply more than 2,500 feet (760 m) in just under 5 miles (8.0 km) into Garnet Canyon. At the 2-mile (3.2 km) point, the trail forks from the Amphitheater Lake Trail and heads south and then west into Garnet Canyon. Garnet Canyon is the most popular approach route for climbers attempting to summit not only Grand Teton but also Middle Teton, South Teton, Teepe Pillar and Disappointment Peak. Though the trail becomes unmaintained once it enters boulder fields at approximately the 9,500-foot (2,900 m) elevation point, climbers continue on to other destinations such as the Lower Saddle, a high altitude mountain pass situated between Middle and Grand Teton. The altitude gain from the Lupine Meadows trailhead to the Lower Saddle is nearly 5,000 feet (1,500 m).

Owl Peak mountain in United States of America

Owl Peak is in the northern Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming and is just east of Elk Mountain. The peak is located west of and across Jackson Lake from Lizard Creek Campground. Access to the peak is easiest by boat to the Berry Creek Trailhead at Wilcox Point then heading west at the Owl Creek Trail. After a 2 miles (3.2 km) hike along Berry Creek and Owl Creek trails, off trail access to the summit can be achieved after a steep ascent of an additional 2 miles (3.2 km). North of the mountain, the Tetons blend into the Yellowstone Plateau while to the south lies Webb Canyon.

References

  1. 1 2 3 "Tepee Pillar, Wyoming". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2011-05-28.
  2. Ortenburger, Leigh N; Reynold G. Jackson (November 1996). A climber's guide to the Teton Range. Mountaineers Books. p. 218. ISBN   0-89886-480-1.
  3. Grand Teton, WY (Map). TopoQwest (United States Geological Survey Maps). Retrieved 2011-05-28.