Tennes

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Tennes
PHOENICIA, Sidon. Tennes. Circa 351-347 BC.jpg
Coinage of Sidon, dated 351/0 BC. Phoenician pentekonter sailing left. Date above (here faint), waves below. King of Persia standing right, holding up lion by lock of mane; Aramaic T’ between.
Allegiance Achaemenid Empire
Years of serviceCirca 351-346 BC
RankKing of Sidon
Battles/warsRevolt against the Achaemenid Empire
West Asia non political.jpg
Red pog.svg
Sidon
The capital of Tennet was Sidon.
Persian style bull protome found in Sidon gives testimony of the Aecheminid rule and influence. Marble, 5th century BC Protome from Eshmun Sanctuary.jpg
Persian style bull protome found in Sidon gives testimony of the Aecheminid rule and influence. Marble, 5th century BC
Coin of Tennes. Tennes can be seen walking behind the Achaemenid king on his carriage. Tennes coin from Sidon.jpg
Coin of Tennes. Tennes can be seen walking behind the Achaemenid king on his carriage.

Tennes (Tabnit in Phoenician) [1] was a king of Sidon under the Achaemenid Empire. His predecessor was Abdashtart I (in Greek, Straton I) [2] , the son of Baalshillem II, who ruled the Phoenician city-state of Sidon from 365 to 352 BC, [3] having been associated in power by his father since the 380s. [4] It remains uncertain whether his known heir and successor, Tennes, was his son or some other close relative. [5]

Sidon City in South Governorate, Lebanon

Sidon, known locally as Sayda or Saida, is the third-largest city in Lebanon. It is located in the South Governorate, of which it is the capital, on the Mediterranean coast. Tyre to the south and Lebanese capital Beirut to the north are both about 40 kilometres away. Sidon has a population of about 80,000 within city limits, while its metropolitan area has more than a quarter-million inhabitants.

Achaemenid Empire first Persian Empire founded by Cyrus the Great

The Achaemenid Empire, also called the First Persian Empire, was an ancient Iranian empire based in Western Asia founded by Cyrus the Great. Ranging at its greatest extent from the Balkans and Eastern Europe proper in the west to the Indus Valley in the east, it was larger than any previous empire in history, spanning 5.5 million square kilometers. Incorporating various peoples of different origins and faiths, it is notable for its successful model of a centralised, bureaucratic administration, for building infrastructure such as road systems and a postal system, the use of an official language across its territories, and the development of civil services and a large professional army. The empire's successes inspired similar systems in later empires.

Abdashtart I

Abdashtart I, the son of Baalshillem II, ruled the Phoenician city-state of Sidon from 365 to 352 BC, having been associated in power by his father since the 380s.

Rebellion of Sidon against the Achaemenid Empire

Soon after the failure of the Egyptian campaign of the Achaemenid ruler Artaxerxes III, Phoenicia declared their independence from Persian rule. This was also followed by rulers of Anatolia and Cyprus. Artaxerxes initiated a counter-offensive against Sidon by commanding the satrap of Syria Belesys and Mazaeus, the satrap of Cilicia, to invade the city and to keep the Phoenicians in check. [6] Both satraps suffered crushing defeats at the hands of Tennes, who was aided by 40,000 Greek mercenaries sent to him by Nectanebo II and commanded by Mentor of Rhodes. [7] As a result, the Persian forces were driven out of Phoenicia. [8]

Artaxerxes III Archaemenid king

Ochus, better known by his dynastic name of Artaxerxes III was King of Kings of the Achaemenid Empire from 358 to 338 BC. He was the son and successor of Artaxerxes II and his mother was Stateira.

Cyprus Island country in the Mediterranean

Cyprus, officially the Republic of Cyprus, is an island country in the Eastern Mediterranean and the third largest and third most populous island in the Mediterranean, located south of Turkey, west of Syria and Lebanon, northwest of Israel and Palestine, north of Egypt, and southeast of Greece.

Belesys was a satrap of Syria for the Achaemenid Empire in the 4th century BCE.

After this, Artaxerxes personally led an army of 330,000 men against Sidon. Artaxerxes' army comprised 300,000 foot soldiers, 30,000 cavalry, 300 triremes, and 500 transports or provision ships. After gathering this army, he sought assistance from the Greeks. Though refused aid by Athens and Sparta, he succeeded in obtaining a thousand Theban heavy-armed hoplites under Lacrates, three thousand Argives under Nicostratus, and six thousand Æolians, Ionians, and Dorians from the Greek cities of Anatolia. This Greek support was numerically small, amounting to no more than 10,000 men, but it formed, together with the Greek mercenaries from Egypt who went over to him afterwards, the force on which he placed his chief reliance, and to which the ultimate success of his expedition was mainly due.

Cavalry soldiers or warriors fighting from horseback

Cavalry or horsemen are soldiers or warriors who fight mounted on horseback. Cavalry were historically the most mobile of the combat arms. An individual soldier in the cavalry is known by a number of designations such as cavalryman, horseman, dragoon, or trooper. The designation of cavalry was not usually given to any military forces that used other animals, such as camels, mules or elephants. Infantry who moved on horseback, but dismounted to fight on foot, were known in the 17th and early 18th centuries as dragoons, a class of mounted infantry which later evolved into cavalry proper while retaining their historic title.

Athens Capital and largest city of Greece

Athens is the capital and largest city of Greece. Athens dominates the Attica region and is one of the world's oldest cities, with its recorded history spanning over 3,400 years and its earliest human presence started somewhere between the 11th and 7th millennium BC.

Sparta City-state in ancient Greece

Sparta was a prominent city-state in ancient Greece. In antiquity, the city-state was known as Lacedaemon, while the name Sparta referred to its main settlement on the banks of the Eurotas River in Laconia, in south-eastern Peloponnese. Around 650 BC, it rose to become the dominant military land-power in ancient Greece.

The approach of Artaxerxes sufficiently weakened the resolution of Tennes that he endeavoured to purchase his own pardon by delivering up 100 principal citizens of Sidon into the hands of the Persian king, and then admitting Artaxerxes within the defences of the town. Artaxerxes had the 100 citizens transfixed with javelins, and when 500 more came out as supplicants to seek his mercy, Artaxerxes consigned them to the same fate. Sidon was then burnt to the ground, either by Artaxerxes or by the Sidonian citizens. Forty thousand people died in the conflagration. [8] Artaxerxes sold the ruins at a high price to speculators, who calculated on reimbursing themselves by the treasures which they hoped to dig out from among the ashes. [9]

Tennes was put to death by Artaxerxes III in 346-345 BC. [1] [10] Artaxerxes later sent Jews who supported the revolt to Hyrcania, on the south coast of the Caspian Sea. [11] [12]

Hyrcania satrapy of the Sassanian Empire

Hyrcania is a historical region composed of the land south-east of the Caspian Sea in modern-day Iran, bound in the south by the Alborz mountain range and the Kopet Dag in the east.

Caspian Sea Body of water between Europe and Asia

The Caspian Sea is the world's largest inland body of water, variously classed as the world's largest lake or a full-fledged sea. It is an endorheic basin located between Europe and Asia, to the east of the Caucasus Mountains and to the west of the broad steppe of Central Asia. The sea has a surface area of 371,000 km2 and a volume of 78,200 km3. It has a salinity of approximately 1.2%, about a third of the salinity of most seawater. It is bounded by Kazakhstan to the northeast, Russia to the northwest, Azerbaijan to the west, Iran to the south, and Turkmenistan to the southeast. The Caspian Sea is home to a wide range of species and may be best known for its caviar and oil industries. Pollution from the oil industry and dams on rivers draining into the Caspian Sea have had negative effects on the organisms living in the sea.

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References

  1. 1 2 Stronk, Jan (2016). Semiramis' Legacy: The History of Persia According to Diodorus of Sicily. Edinburgh University Press. p. 259. ISBN   9781474414265.
  2. Markoe, Glenn (2000). Phoenicians. U of California P. pp. 58–. ISBN   9780520226142.
  3. Steiner, Margreet L.; Killebrew, Ann E. (2014). The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of the Levant: c. 8000-332 BCE. OUP Oxford. pp. 109, 117. ISBN   9780191662553 . Retrieved 17 March 2016.
  4. Sagona, C. (ed.), Beyond the Homeland: Markers in Phoenician Chronology (Leuven, 2008), p. 105
  5. Sagona, C. (ed.), Beyond the Homeland: Markers in Phoenician Chronology (Leuven, 2008), p. 106
  6. Heckel, Waldemar (2008). Who's Who in the Age of Alexander the Great: Prosopography of Alexander's Empire. John Wiley & Sons. p. 172. ISBN   9781405154697.
  7. Gershevitch, I.; Fisher, William Bayne (1985). The Cambridge History of Iran. Cambridge University Press. p. 385. ISBN   9780521200912.
  8. 1 2 "Artaxerxes III Ochus ( 358 BC to 338 BC )" . Retrieved March 2, 2008.
  9. Rawlinson, George (1889). "Phœnicia under the Persians". History of Phoenicia. Longmans, Green. Archived from the original on July 20, 2006. Retrieved March 10, 2008.
  10. Meyer, Eduard (1911). "Artaxerxes"  . In Chisholm, Hugh (ed.). Encyclopædia Britannica . 2 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. pp. 661–663.
  11. "The Legend Of Gog And Magog". Archived from the original on March 15, 2008. Retrieved March 10, 2008.
  12. Bruce, Frederick Fyvie (1990). The Acts of the Apostles: The Greek Text with Introduction and Commentary. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing. p. 117. ISBN   0-8028-0966-9.