Terry Clawson

Last updated

Terry Clawson
Personal information
Full nameTerence A. Clawson [1]
Born9 April 1940
Normanton, England [2]
Died2 September 2013(2013-09-02) (aged 73)
Pontefract, England [2]
Playing information
Position Prop, Second-row
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1957–65 Featherstone Rovers 1913948301083
1965–68 Bradford Northern 128+2152300505
1968–71 Hull Kingston Rovers 110+192040435
1971–73 Leeds 6351650345
1973–75 Oldham 22126055
1974–75 York 2824014
1976–77 Bradford Northern 17+4119041
1978 Featherstone Rovers 242006
1978–79 Wakefield Trinity 90204
1979 Huddersfield 31003
1980 Hull F.C. 20000
Total60475113302491
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1960–71 Yorkshire 8+10306
1962–74 Great Britain 14025050
1974 GB tour games 9021042
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
1978 Featherstone Rovers 1340931
South Newcastle
Total1340931
Source: [3] [4]

[5]

Terence "Terry" A. Clawson (9 April 1940 – 2 September 2013) was an English World Cup winning professional rugby league footballer who played from the 1950s through to the 1980s. He played at representative level for Great Britain between 1962 and 1974, and was part of the 1972 Rugby League World Cup winning squad. He also played for Yorkshire, and at club level for Featherstone Rovers (Heritage № 390) (two spells) (captain), Bradford Northern (Heritage №) (two spells), Leeds (Heritage №), Hull Kingston Rovers (Heritage №), Oldham (Heritage №), York, Wakefield Trinity (Heritage № 859), Hull FC and South Newcastle (of the Newcastle Rugby League in Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia), as a goal-kicking prop or second-row, i.e. number 8 or 10, or, 11 or 12. [3] He coached at club level for South Newcastle and Featherstone Rovers. [4]

Contents

Background

Clawson as born in Normanton, West Riding of Yorkshire, England, he worked as a coal miner both during, and after, his playing career, [6] in 2000, he released an autobiography, entitled All the Wrong Moves, [7] he died aged 73 in Pontefract, West Yorkshire, England.

Playing career

Featherstone Rovers

Clawson started his career at Featherstone Rovers, making his début aged 17 against Bramley on Saturday 28 December 1957. [8] He won his first club trophy in 1959, Terry Clawson played loose forward in Featherstone Rovers' 15-14 victory over Hull F.C. in the 1959–60 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1959–60 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 31 October 1959. [2] In 1963, it was discovered that Clawson had contracted tuberculosis, threatening to bring his rugby league career to an end. [7] He made a full recovery however, although he missed the majority of the 1963–64 season. [9]

Clawson won caps for Yorkshire while at Featherstone Rovers; during the 1960–61 season against Lancashire, and during the 1962–63 season against Cumberland, and Lancashire.

Bradford Northern

In January 1965, Clawson was transferred to Bradford Northern for a fee believed to be just over £3,000. [10] He appeared in over 130 games for Bradford, scoring more than 500 points. [11]

Terry Clawson played right-second-row, i.e. number 12, and scored 4-goals in Bradford Northern's 17–8 victory over Hunslet in the 1965–66 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1965–66 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 16 October 1965.

Hull Kingston Rovers

In October 1968, Hull Kingston Rovers signed Clawson in an exchange deal which saw Geoff Wriglesworth and Frank Foster join Bradford Northern. [8] He went to make 111 appearances for the club before joining Leeds in 1971.

Leeds

Clawson played for Leeds in the 1971–72 Challenge Cup Final during the 1971–72 season at Wembley Stadium, but ended up on the losing side in a 13–16 defeat by St. Helens. A week later, he played and scored three conversions in Leeds 9–5 victory over St Helens in the Championship Final during the 1971–72 season at Station Road, Swinton on Saturday 20 May 1972, and was awarded the Harry Sunderland Trophy for his man of the match performance.

Clawson played left-prop, i.e. number 8, (replaced by interchange/substitute Tony Fisher) and scored 5-goals in Leeds' 36–9 victory over Dewsbury in the 1972–73 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1972–73 season at Odsal Stadium, Bradford on Saturday 7 October 1972, and played right-prop, i.e. number 10, in the 7–2 victory over Wakefield Trinity in the 1973–74 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1973–74 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 20 October 1973.

Clawson played left-prop, i.e. number 8, and scored 2-goals in Leeds' 12–7 victory over Salford in the 1972–73 Player's No.6 Trophy Final during the 1972–73 season at Fartown Ground, Huddersfield on Saturday 24 March 1973.

Clawson later joined Oldham. [12]

Later career

Clawson spent 12 months at Oldham before moving on to York. He went to have second spells at Bradford Northern and Featherstone Rovers, and also played for Wakefield Trinity, Huddersfield and Hull FC, where he played his last match in 1980, aged 40.

Australian career

During the 1970s Clawson captained-coached in Australia's Newcastle Rugby League with the Souths club. [13] He was later named in a South Newcastle team of the century in 2010. [14]

International honours

Terry Clawson won caps for Great Britain while at Featherstone Rovers in 1962 against France (2 matches), while at Leeds in the 1972 Rugby League World Cup against Australia, France and Australia, while at Oldham in 1973 against Australia (3 matches), and in 1974 against France (2 matches), Australia (2 matches), and New Zealand (2 matches). [3]

Genealogical information

Terry Clawson is the father of the rugby league footballer who played in the 1980s for Bradford Northern, and is a strength and conditioning coach; Martin Clawson, and the rugby league footballer who played in the 1980s and 1990s for Featherstone Rovers, Oldham and Swinton; Neil Clawson.

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References

  1. "Index entry". FreeBMD. ONS. Retrieved 25 September 2014.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. 1 2 3 Hadfield, Dave (13 September 2013). "Terry Clawson: Rugby league hard man who won the 1972 World Cup". The Independent. Retrieved 25 September 2014.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. 1 2 3 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. 1 2 "Coach Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. RL Record Keepers' Club
  6. Fletcher, Paul; Harlow, Phil (22 October 2008). "When Great Britain won the World Cup". BBC Sport. Retrieved 27 September 2014.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. 1 2 Collomosse, Andrew (8 November 2000). "Book Review: Clawson moves into literature". Telegraph. Retrieved 27 September 2014.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. 1 2 "Terry Clawson". Hull Kingston Rovers RLFC. Retrieved 25 September 2014.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. "Terry Clawson". Featherstone Rovers RLFC. 5 September 2013. Retrieved 27 September 2014.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  10. Mather, Harold (30 January 1965). "Stalls are set out in the transfer market". The Guardian. London. p. 12. ProQuest   184974174.
  11. "Clawson is put on transfer list". The Guardian. London. 23 October 1968. p. 18. ProQuest   185306634.
  12. Caplan, Phil (5 September 2013). "Terry Clawson RIP". Leeds Rhinos. Retrieved 27 September 2014.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  13. "1970–1979". Newcastle Rugby League. sportingpulse.com. Retrieved 30 December 2011.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  14. Leeson, John (31 December 2011). "Souths honour greatest players". The Newcastle Herald . Retrieved 1 January 2012.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Keith Goulding
1977–1978
Coach
Fevcolours.svg
Featherstone Rovers

1978
Succeeded by
Thomas Smales
1978–1979