Terry Day (rugby league)

Last updated

Terry Day
Personal information
Full nameTerrence Day
Born1953 (age 6768)
Pontefract, Yorkshire
Playing information
Position Wing, Centre, Stand-off
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1972–75 [1] Dewsbury 85216075
1975–80 York 1144111127
1980–81 Wakefield Trinity 40130039
1981–83 [2] Hull F.C. 58310093
1983–84Warrington (loan)121004
Total30910771338
Source: [3]

Terry Day (born 1953) is a former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s and 1980s. He played at club level for Dewsbury, York, Wakefield Trinity (Heritage No. 877) (captain), Hull FC and Warrington (Heritage No. 835), as a wing , centre, or stand-off, i.e. number 2 or 5, 3 or 4, or 6. [3] [4]

Contents

Playing career

Terry Day made his début for Wakefield Trinity during September 1980, and he played his last match for Wakefield Trinity during the 1981–82 season, he was signed by Warrington from Hull F.C. on a season-long loan for the 1983–84 season, he made his début for Warrington on Wednesday 21 September 1983, and he played his last match for Warrington on Sunday 4 December 1983.

Championship Final appearances

Terry Day played left wing, i.e. number 5, in Dewsbury's 22–13 victory over Leeds in the Championship Final during the 1972–73 season at Odsal Stadium, Bradford on Saturday 19 May 1973.

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Terry Day played right-centre, i.e. number 3 (James Leuluai played right-centre in the replay), in Hull FC's 14–14 draw with Widnes in the 1981–82 Challenge Cup Final during the 1981–82 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 1 May 1982, in front of a crowd of 92,147, and played as an interchange/substitute, i.e. number 14, (replacing scrum-half Kevin Harkin) in the 12–14 defeat by Featherstone Rovers in the 1982–83 Challenge Cup Final during the 1982–83 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 7 May 1983, in front of a crowd of 84,969. [5]

County Cup Final appearances

Terry Day played left-centre, i.e. number 4, in Dewsbury's 9-36 defeat by Leeds in the 1972–73 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1972–73 season at Odsal Stadium, Bradford on Saturday 7 October 1972, in front of a crowd of 7,806, played right-centre, i.e. number 3, (replaced by interchange/substitute, i.e. number 14, John Crossley Jr.) in York's 8-18 defeat by Bradford Northern in the 1978–79 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1978–79 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 28 October 1978, in front of a crowd of 10,429, and played right-centre in Hull FC's 18–7 victory over Bradford Northern in the 1982–83 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1982–83 season at Elland Road, Leeds on Saturday 2 October 1982, in front of a crowd of 11,755.

John Player Trophy Final appearances

Terry Day played stand-off in Hull FC's 12–4 victory over Hull Kingston Rovers in the 1981–82 John Player Trophy Final during the 1981–82 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 23 January 1982, in front of a crowd of 25,245.

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References

  1. John Player RL Yearbook 1973-74 edited by Jack Winstanley ISBN 362001480 page 66
  2. Rothmans RL Yearbook 1982-83 by Raymond Fletcher and David Howes ISBN   0907574157 page 54
  3. 1 2 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  4. Mike Rylance (22 August 2013). "Trinity: A History of the Wakefield Rugby League Football Club 1872-2013". League Publications Ltd. ISBN   978-1901347289
  5. "A complete history of Hull FC's Challenge Cup finals". Hull Daily Mail. 22 August 2013. Archived from the original on 3 February 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2014.