Terry Heffernan

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Terence Michael "Terry" Heffernan (3 February 1952 13 March 2010) was a New Zealand politician who stood for Parliament on eight separate occasions. Heffernan was originally a member of the Social Credit Party before joining the New Zealand First Party and later, the New Zealand National Party.

Social Credit Party (New Zealand)

The New Zealand Social Credit Party was a political party which served as the country's "third party" from the 1950s through into the 1980s. The party held a number of seats in the New Zealand House of Representatives, although never more than two at a time. It has since renamed itself the New Zealand Democratic Party, and was for a time part of the Alliance.

New Zealand First, commonly abbreviated to NZ First, is a nationalist and populist political party in New Zealand. It was founded in July 1993, following the resignation on 19 March 1993 of its leader and founder, Winston Peters, from the then-governing National Party. It has formed governments with both major parties in New Zealand: first with the National Party from 1996 to 1998, and then with the Labour Party from 2005 to 2008 and from 2017 to present.

New Zealand National Party Major New Zealand political party

The New Zealand National Party, shortened to National or the Nats, is a centre-right political party in New Zealand. It is one of two major parties that dominate contemporary New Zealand politics, alongside its traditional rival, the New Zealand Labour Party.

Contents

Early years

He was born in Oamaru and attended St Bede's College in Christchurch. He obtained a degree in history and economics at the University of Canterbury after starting an accounting degree. He taught at Christchurch Boys' High School and Xavier College, but with a passion for politics became a parliamentary researcher for Bruce Beetham and then Winston Peters. He admired 1930s Labour politicians Savage and Lee.

Oamaru Town in Otago, New Zealand

Oamaru is the largest town in North Otago, in the South Island of New Zealand, it is the main town in the Waitaki District. It is 80 kilometres (50 mi) south of Timaru and 120 kilometres (75 mi) north of Dunedin on the Pacific coast; State Highway 1 and the railway Main South Line connect it to both cities. With a population of 13,950, Oamaru is the 28th largest urban area in New Zealand, and the third largest in Otago behind Dunedin and Queenstown.

University of Canterbury university in Christchurch, New Zealand

The University of Canterbury is New Zealand's second oldest university.

Bruce Beetham New Zealand politician

Bruce Craig Beetham was an academic and politician from New Zealand, whose career spanned the 1970s and early 1980s.

Political activities

Originally a stalwart of the Social Credit Party, he represented them in the 1979 Christchurch Central by-election and came second; Labour’s Geoffrey Palmer won the seat.

Geoffrey Palmer (politician) Prime Minister of New Zealand, politician, academic

Sir Geoffrey Winston Russell Palmer is a New Zealand lawyer, legal academic, and past politician, who was a member of Parliament from 1979 to 1990. He served as the 33rd Prime Minister of New Zealand for a little over a year, from August 1989 until September 1990, leading the Fourth Labour Government. As Minister of Justice from 1984 to 1989, Palmer was responsible for considerable reforms of the country's legal and constitutional framework, such as the creation of the Constitution Act 1986, New Zealand Bill of Rights, Imperial Laws Application Act, and the State Sector Act. He served as president of the New Zealand Law Commission, from 2005 to 2010.

Heffernan stood in the Wanganui electorate in five general elections: [1]

The Alliance was a left-wing political party in New Zealand. It was formed at the end of 1991 by the linking of four smaller parties. The Alliance positioned itself as a democratic socialist alternative to the centre-left New Zealand Labour Party. It was influential throughout the 1990s, but suffered a major setback after its founder and leader, Jim Anderton, left the party in 2002, taking with him several of its members of parliament (MPs). After the remaining MPs lost their seats in the 2002 general election, some commentators predicted the demise of the party.

In 1987 he came second to Labour's Russell Marshall, who had an election-night majority of only 27 (though Marshall's final majority was 248).

The New Zealand Labour Party, or simply Labour, is a centre-left political party in New Zealand. The party's platform programme describes its founding principle as democratic socialism, while observers describe Labour as social-democratic and pragmatic in practice. It is a participant of the international Progressive Alliance.

Russell Marshall New Zealand politician

Cedric Russell Marshall, known as Russell Marshall, is a former New Zealand politician of the Labour Party and diplomat.

In 1996 Heffernan stood for New Zealand First in Albany, against Murray McCully. [2]

In the 2008 election, he stood as the National Party candidate for the Christchurch electorate of Port Hills, though already weakened by cancer. [3]

Death

Heffernan died in Christchurch on 13 March 2010, and his funeral was celebrated in St Joseph's Catholic Church in Papanui, Christchurch. A notice of motion in remembrance was lodged by Ruth Dyson in parliament on 18 March 2010. [4]

Notes

  1. Norton 1988, pp. 12, 107, 130.
  2. "Electorate Candidate and Party Votes Recorded at Each Polling Place - Albany" (PDF). Retrieved 24 December 2011.[ permanent dead link ]
  3. Espiner, Colin (25 March 2008). "It's Beaurepaires at Parliament as retreads rolled out". The Press . Retrieved 23 September 2014.
  4. Order Paper Archived 30 March 2012 at the Wayback Machine New Zealand House of Representatives, 23 March 2010

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